Lubbock Christian University

Full Catalog

General Information

Accreditation

  • Lubbock Christian University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate degrees. Lubbock Christian University also may offer credentials such as certificates and diplomas at approved degree levels. Questions about the accreditation of Lubbock Christian University may be directed in writing to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097, by calling (404) 679-4500, or by using information available on SACSCOC’s website (www.sacscoc.org).
  • The Lubbock Christian University teacher education programs are accredited by the Texas Education Agency Educator Certification and Standards, 1701 North Congress Avenue WBT 5-100, Austin, Texas 78701.
  • The Lubbock Christian University teacher education programs are accredited by the Texas Education Agency Educator Certification and Standards, 1701 North Congress Avenue WBT 5-100, Austin, Texas 78701.
  • The Lubbock Christian University Bachelor of Social Work degree program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, 1725 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, 703.683.8080.
  • The graduate nursing program at Lubbock Christian University Department of Nursing located in Lubbock, Texas is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), 3390 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 1400 Atlanta, GA 30326, 404.975.5000. The most recent accreditation decision made by the ACEN Board of Commissioners for the graduate nursing program is continuing accreditation.
    • Effective October 9, 2023, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is a candidate for initial accreditation by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). This candidacy status expires on October 9, 2025.
  • The undergraduate nursing program at Lubbock Christian University Department of Nursing located in Lubbock, Texas is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), 3390 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 1400 Atlanta, GA 30326, 404.975.5000. The most recent accreditation decision made by the ACEN Board of Commissioners for the undergraduate nursing program is continuing accreditation.
  • The Lubbock Christian University Business programs offered through the Lubbock Christian University School of Business are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP), 11520 West 119th Street, Overland Park, KS 66213. For information on specific program accreditation, see the School of Business section of this catalog.

Memberships

  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
  • Alpha Chi National Honor Society
  • American Association of University Women
  • Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs
  • Association of Texas Colleges and Universities
  • Association on Higher Education and Disability
  • Council for Christian Colleges and Universities
  • Council on Social Work Education
  • Council on Undergraduate Research
  • Fellowship of Christian Nurses
  • Great Plains Honors Council
  • Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas
  • Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society for Education
  • Lone Star Conference
  • Modern Language Association
  • National Association of Fellowship Advisors
  • National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association – Division II
  • National Collegiate Honors Council
  • National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements
  • National Council of Family Relations
  • Online Computer Library Center/Amigos Library Services
  • Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society
  • Phi Alpha Honor Society for Social Work
  • Sigma Tau Delta Honor Society for English
  • Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society for Nursing
  • Texas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
  • Texas Association of Music Schools
  • Texas Learning Consortium
  • TexShare Consortium of Texas Libraries

Equal Opportunity

Lubbock Christian University is open to persons regardless of race, color, gender, age, religion, national origin, or disabled condition who are otherwise eligible for admission as students. In the educational programs and activities of the university, students are treated without discrimination in their participation. In accordance with title IX, the university does not discriminate on the basis of gender in its education programs or activities.

Any title IX inquiries, complaints, or grievances should be referred to the Title IX coordinator, Kaili Hutchinson, 806.720.7503, Administration Building, 119B, 5601 19th Street, Lubbock, TX 7940 or reported electronically. Grievances may also be submitted to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1999 Bryan Street, Suite 2600, Dallas, TX 75201. 

Changes to the Catalog

Courses, tuition, fees and other conditions and policies set forth in this catalog shall be subject to change without notice at any time. Changes or additions to the catalog are posted on the university web site.

Contact Information

Lubbock Christian University
5601 19th Street, Lubbock, TX 79407
Admissions Toll Free 800.933.7601
Admissions 806.720.7151
Fax 806.720.7255
www.LCU.edu

Mission, Vision, Heritage and Values

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Mission

Lubbock Christian University is a Christ-centered, academic community of learners, transforming the hearts, minds, and hands of students for lives of purpose and service.

Vision

Lubbock Christian University will be a leading Christian University, known for its academic excellence and its commitment to faith that seeks understanding, where wisdom is pursued, vocation is discerned, and service is fostered.

Heritage of Faith

Lubbock Christian University was founded in 1957 by members of the Churches of Christ who came together to establish a Christian university on the South Plains of Texas for the purpose of preparing and equipping students for lives of Christian service. The university is committed to continuing to walk with, to serve, and to be sustained by that fellowship. We welcome and embrace all of our students who come to the university from different faith backgrounds and perspectives, each of them a precious creation of God. As part of a tradition that grew out of a deep commitment to Christian unity and the renewing power of the Word, our hope and prayer is that the university will be a force for reconciliation, consistent with the best instincts of our heritage.

Identity and Values

We are authentically Christ-centered, guided by our faith in Jesus in every dimension of our life as a community of higher learning.

We are committed to students, providing a transformative educational experience that equips students for lives of integrity.

We are scholars and co-discoverers, guided by Christian wisdom while diligently seeking the truth in every discipline.

We are a welcoming community, embodying a spirit of hospitality in every aspect of our lives together.

We are thoughtfully engaged, serving as agents, models, and witnesses of the Kingdom of God in our families, churches, and communities

We practice the highest standards of excellence, “working with all of our hearts as working for the Lord,” and glorifying God in all we do.

We act with integrity, discerning right from wrong, speaking the truth, and keeping our commitments.

We treat others with dignity and respect, valuing each person as one made in God’s image.

Academic Structure

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Alfred and Patricia Smith College of Biblical Studies

  • Department of Biblical Studies
  • Graduate School of Theology

Honors College

  • Honors

J.E. and Eileen Hancock College of Liberal Arts

  • Department of Behavioral Sciences
  • Department of Communication and Fine Arts
  • Department of Humanities

B. Ward Lane College of Professional Studies

  • Department of Chemistry
  • Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences
  • Department of Mathematics
  • Department of Natural Sciences
  • Department of Nursing
  • Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice

School of Business

School of Education

Academic Calendar

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Academic Calendars

Finals Schedule will be available here once they are created.

Undergraduate Academic Programs

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Graduate Academic Programs

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Undergraduate Admission Standards

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Lubbock Christian University is open to all persons regardless of race, color, gender, age, religion, national origin, or disabled condition who are otherwise eligible for admission as students. In all university educational programs and activities, students are treated without discrimination in their participation. The university may exercise due diligence and deny admission to otherwise qualified individuals who have a history that indicates their presence might endanger members of the university community. To be considered for admission to distance education programs, the university must have prior state authorization to enroll students in the applicant state of residence. Students entering a program to prepare for licensing or certification should be aware that a licensing or certification authority may require a criminal background check and may consider individuals with convictions or deferred adjudication for a felony or misdemeanor offense to be ineligible. Students with a concern have the right to request that the licensing authority issue a criminal history evaluation letter regarding their eligibility. For more information, consult the specific licensing or certification authority.

Applicants are admitted as First-Time beginning or Transfer students.

  • First-time beginning applicants either have no postsecondary educational experience or have advance college credit earned while in high school or the summer immediately following high school graduation.
  • Transfer applicants are students who have graduated from high school and attended a long semester (fall/spring) at a college or university after the high school graduation.

To be considered for admission, an application for admission must be completed and submitted with payment of the non-refundable $50 application fee. First-time beginning applicants must apply using the deadlines listed under the unconditional admissions section. Other applicants must apply no later than June 30 for fall entry and December 1 for spring entry. Applications received after the deadline will be considered if space allows. Admitted first-time beginning applicants must confirm their intention to enroll by remitting a non-refundable $200 tuition advance, which will be applied to their initial tuition bill. Deadlines for remittance of the tuition advance are June 1 for summer or fall entry, December 1 for spring entry, or prior to registration, whichever comes first. First-time beginning applicants accepted after the deadline must remit the tuition advance within two weeks of the date of the acceptance letter or prior to registration, whichever comes first. Documents establishing eligibility for admission must be official.

State law requires the meningitis vaccine for students, which must be received at least 10 days before but not more than 5 years before the first day of class. Students 22 or older by the first day of class are exempt from meningitis vaccine requirement. See LCU.edu/meningitis for more information.

High School GPA Admissions Criteria (test-preferred):  First-time beginning applicants for Lubbock Christian University undergraduate admission will be considered for unconditional admission based on a minimum high school GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

Students are encouraged to submit scores from nationally standardized entrance examinations such as the ACT, CLT, or SAT to improve scholarship opportunities, however scores are not required for students with a qualifying high school GPA. Admission to the Honors College will require qualifying ACT, SAT, or CLT scores.

Phone numbers for undergraduate admissions are 1.806.720.7151, 1.800.933.7601 (toll free), and 1.806.214.0826 (fax). The undergraduate admissions e-mail address is Admissions@LCU.edu.

Unconditional Admission

First-Time Beginning Students

First-time beginning applicants with an ACT score of 25 or higher ,SAT score of 1200 or higher, or CLT score of 78 or higher are assured unconditional admission (high school GPA on final transcript must be 2.5 or higher).

First-time beginning applicants with an ACT of 16-24, SAT of 870-1210, or CLT of 55-77 are considered for unconditional admission based on an admissions index calculated by adding the ACT score equivalent to the high school GPA (4.0 scale) times 10. An admissions index of 45 or higher is granted unconditional admission subject to the following exceptions.

  • ACT of 15 (SAT of 860 or CLT of 54) or lower is not considered for unconditional admission regardless of high school GPA.
  • High school GPA lower than 2.5 is not considered for unconditional admission regardless of ACT or SAT test scores.

First-time beginning applicants must have graduated from an accredited high school, completed a home school secondary curriculum, or passed the General Education Development (GED) test with a score of 145 or higher on each subject test. Students completing a GED must score at least an 18 on the ACT (SAT 950) to be considered for unconditional admission.

Early Decision Period One - First-time beginning applicant

Completed application includes high school transcript through junior year, completed application forms, standardized test scores (ACT, SAT, or CLT), application fee, and statement of purpose.

  • Application deadline is October 31
  • Early decision period one notifications made by December 15

Early Decision Period Two - First-time beginning applicant

Completed application includes high school transcript through fall semester of senior year, completed application forms, standardized test scores (ACT or SAT), application fee, and statement of purpose.

  • Application deadline is January 1
  • Early decision notifications made by February 15

Regular Decision - First-time beginning applicant

Completed application includes high school transcript through graduation, completed application forms, standardized test scores (ACT, SAT, or CLT), application fee, and statement of purpose.

  • Application deadline is June 15
  • Regular decision notifications made by July 15

Before beginning classes, first-time beginning applicants must submit:

  • official ACT, SAT, or CLT score reports
  • official high school transcript showing graduation, or
  • official transcript showing graduation from a home school secondary curriculum, or
  • official score report indicating that the GED was passed with a score of 145 or higher on each subject test.
  • First-time beginning applicants with college credit must also submit official college transcripts for that credit.

Transfer Students

A transfer student is defined as a student who has graduated from high school and attended a long semester (fall/spring) at a college or university after the high school graduation date.

Transfer applicants with 15 or fewer hours of transfer credit with ACT score of 25 or higher (SAT of 1130, SAT of 1220 or higher, or CLT of 78 or higher) are assured unconditional admission (high school GPA on final transcript must be at least 2.5 and college GPA must be at least 2.0).

Transfer applicants with 15 or fewer hours of transfer credit with an ACT of 16-24, SAT of 770-1120, or CLT score of 55-76 are considered for unconditional admission based on an admissions index calculated by adding the ACT score equivalent to the high school GPA (4.0 scale) times 10. An admissions index of 45 or more is granted unconditional admission subject to the following exceptions.

  • ACT of 15 (SAT of 860 or CLT of 54) or lower is not considered for unconditional admission regardless of high school GPA.
  • High school GPA lower than 2.5 is not considered for unconditional admission regardless of ACT or SAT test scores.
  • College GPA lower than 2.0 is not considered for unconditional admission

Transfer applicants with 15 or fewer hours of transfer credit must have graduated from an accredited high school, completed a home school secondary curriculum, or passed the GED with a minimum score of 145 on each subject test, and have a college GPA of 2.0 or higher.

Before beginning classes, transfer applicants with fewer than 15 hours of transfer credit must submit:

  • official college transcripts for all postsecondary work
  • official ACT, SAT, or CLT score reports
  • official high school transcript showing graduation, or
  • official transcript showing graduation from a home school secondary curriculum, or
  • official score report for the GED.

Transfers with 16 or More Hours of Transfer Credit

  • 2.00 college GPA or higher

Program Specific Transfer Requirements

  • Admission for the following programs is reserved for students who have earned at least 45 college credit hours and are at least 25 years of age.  
    • Bachelor of Science in Managerial Leadership
    • Bachelor of Arts in University Studies

Special Admission

Applicants not meeting standards for unconditional admission may appeal, in writing, for special admission. Applicants admitted on appeal are admitted on academic probation. Terms of probation will be determined by admissions appeal committee.

Readmission

Students who withdraw from the university or are not enrolled for one full semester, must submit a new application for admission, a new health form, and a transcript from each school attended in the interim. Students who were suspended for academic deficiency may apply for readmission to the university after one long semester.

Military servicemembers and veterans who withdraw from the University for service in the Armed Force, including National Guard and Reserves, are eligible for readmission to the same program or course of study if the circumstances of withdrawal meet the readmission requirements for servicemembers outlined in 34 C.F.R. 668.18.

Temporary Admission

Students who are not seeking a degree may be admitted with a temporary status, but they are limited to nine hours of undergraduate work during an enrollment period. The student will be allowed to complete up to 12 hours of undergraduate work unless they are seeking a degree at another university. When students reach this 12 hour limit, they must apply for unconditional admission. Students applying for temporary admission must re-apply for each enrollment period.

Concurrent Admission

The university has an agreement with Texas Tech University and with South Plains College that allows students enrolled in one institution to register concurrently in the other institution. Freshmen cannot concurrently register without permission from the appropriate academic dean. Texas Tech or South Plains College students seeking a concurrent course at the university must apply through the admissions office. Students seeking concurrent enrollment at another institution must give prior notification to the registrar before applying.

International Student Admission

This school is authorized under federal law to enroll international students. The following items must be submitted to the admissions office before the university can issue an I-20 to international students.

  • Completed application for admission
  • Recent photograph
  • Copy of passport
  • Completed health form
  • Immunization Record demonstrating required immunizations
  • Transcripts–an international student must have an official English translation of transcripts for secondary school and university/college courses completed. Note: a student who has completed college level work in a foreign country is required to submit an academic evaluation done by a reputable educational consulting service. The admissions office will be glad to provide the necessary contact information upon request.
  • Application Fee–nonrefundable fee of $50
  • Prepayment–each student must pay a $200 non-refundable tuition advance prior to registering for classes and make final payment for the first semester tuition, fees, room, and board by the 10th day of classes. Payment should be made to the student account advisor in the Business Office.
  • Verification of Source of Support: Satisfactory evidence of financial resources must be established, which includes a financial statement for the last six months and an affidavit of support.
  • TOEFL English Language Test–minimum composite score of 525 on the TOEFL-CBT or 71 on the TOEFL-IBT must be achieved for admission. A score of 5.5 or higher on the IELTS or a score of 95 or higher on Duolingo will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. See following section regarding TOEFL exemptions.
  • Signed F-1 Status Contract
  • Statement of Purpose–a personal essay describing their career goals and why they want to study at the university.
  • Professional Recommendation–recommendation should come from a high school or college teacher or counselor
  • Personal Recommendation–recommendation should come from a minister or some other professional who is well acquainted with the applicant.
  • International applicants without previous college work will be required to take the ACT or SAT exam.
    • To be accepted, international applicants must score a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 950 on the SAT.
    • 2022-2023 GPA Admissions option:  Students who are unable to take the SAT or ACT as a result of COVID-19 disruptions may be considered for unconditional admission based on a minimum high school GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.  Students are encouraged to take the ACT, SAT, or CLT to assist with scholarship consideration.  Admission to the Honors College will require qualifying ACT, SAT, or CLT scores.
  • International students assume complete responsibility for their health care expenses. International students are considered to be maintaining status if they are making acceptable progress toward the completion of a degree.

International Students from English Speaking Countries

English-speaking applicants from native English-speaking countries, including Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the British Caribbean Islands, Canada, Ireland, Israel, the United Kingdom, and Kenya are not required to submit TOEFL or IELTS scores. The TOEFL or IELTS requirement will be waived for students scoring 490 or above on the SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing test or 18 or above on the ACT English test.

LCU Early College Academy Dual Enrollment Program

Lubbock Christian University has agreements with participating high schools and homeschool partners to offer dual credit for eligible students. The Early College Academy will introduce high school students to a faith-based college experience by providing positive educational outcomes paired with LCU’s Christian Mission. Eligible high school students from participating schools may earn a maximum of 24 LCU college credit hours prior to graduating high school. For more information about this program and the courses being offered, students should contact their school guidance counselor or Early College Academy liaison.

Advanced Credit Policy

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Advanced Credit Using the ACT

The university will award college credit for an ACT score of 28 or higher in English or Mathematics.

Advanced Credit Using the SAT

For tests taken after February 2005 and before March 2016 (SAT), the university will award college credit for a score of 670 or higher in Critical Reading or Mathematics. For tests taken after March 2016 (SAT16), the university will award college credit for a score of 710 or higher in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing or Math.

Other Tests for Advanced Credit

Students may contact the testing coordinator to obtain further information regarding these tests:

  • Advanced Placement (AP)–Examinations. Students who are enrolled in high school honors classes offering the advanced placement program should consult with their counselors about registering for advanced placement examinations given in May each year. The university will award college credit for a minimum score of 3 on most AP exams.
  • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)–The testing office offers CLEP testing by appointment each semester. Students may also take CLEP tests at any other testing center and request their scores be sent to the university.
  • End of Course (EOC) Examinations–Students who possess sufficient knowledge in an academic area and wish to challenge a course for credit should contact the Testing Coordinator for information. Students may not take a challenge exam in a course that is creditable by CLEP. The university reserves the right to determine which courses may be challenged. Prerequisites for the course to be challenged must be met before testing will be approved. Regulations on credit by examination apply to end-of-course examinations.
  • Armed Forces Credit–The university will evaluate for credit appropriate educational experience in the armed services as recommended by the American Council for Education (ACE).

Applicability of Advanced Credit to Degree Program

Students should consult with the appropriate department chair or dean about the applicability of advanced credit to their graduation requirements before seeking credit.

Miscellaneous Information on Advanced Credit

  • CLEP, EOC, and DSST exams have fees associated with testing as well as administrative fees.  Information about the cost of each exam, administrative fees that may apply, and additional information testers need to be aware of prior to testing is available through LCU Academic Testing.
  • The maximum credit toward graduation that may be earned by advanced credit is 45 semester hours. The university reserves the right to evaluate tests for duplication and to define which courses available for advanced credit, the specific score required, and the credit awarded.
  • Course credit by examination may not be used to satisfy the residence requirement for a bachelor's degree.
  • Credit earned by advanced credit is marked TR on the transcript and will not count toward the computation of grade point averages. The university does not guarantee credit earned by advanced credit will transfer to another institution.
  • Students must wait three months or longer before repeating advance credit examinations.
  • Advanced credit will not be granted if the course is a prerequisite or is not as academically advanced as a course already completed.
  • Advanced credit is not available for courses in which students are enrolled. Enrollment is defined as being on the class roll after the 12th day of a long term or after the 3rd day of a short term.
  • Advanced credit will not be granted if students have previously taken the course or subject matter at any college.

Minimum Scores Required to Earn Advanced Credit

ACT–American College Testing Program–Exam is taken prior to admission to the university. Official score report is required to award credit.

ACT EXAM SCORE COURSE ID COURSE TITLE
Math 28 MAT1311 College Algebra
English 28 ENG1301 Composition Studies

SAT taken after February 2005 and before March 2016. Exam must be taken prior to admission to the university. Official score report is required to award credit.

SAT EXAM SCORE COURSE ID COURSE TITLE
MATH 670 MAT1311 College Algebra
CRITICAL READING 670 ENG1301 Composition Studies

SAT taken after March 2016. Exam must be taken prior to admission to the university. Official score report is required to award credit.

SAT 16 EXAM SCORE COURSE ID COURSE TITLE
MATH 710 MAT1311 College Algebra
EVIDENCE-BASED READING AND WRITING 710 ENG1301 Composition Studies

AP–Advanced Placement Program–College Entrance Examination Board: Courses and exams are taken in high school. Official transcripts are required from CEEB to award credit.

AP EXAM SCORE COURSE ID COURSE TITLE
Art History 3 ART2307 or 2308 Survey of Art History I or II
Biology 3 BIO1401 General Biology I
Biology 4,5 BIO 1401 and 1402 General Biology I and II
Calculus AB 3 MAT1402 Calculus I
Calculus BC 3 MAT1402 Calculus I
Calculus BC 4 MAT1402 and 1403 Calculus I and II
Chemistry 3 CHE1307 and 1107 General Chemistry I and Lab
Chemistry 4,5 CHE1307 and 1107 CHE1308 and 1108 General Chemistry I and II and Labs
Chinese Language and Culture 3 CHIN141 Chinese Language I
Chinese Language and Culture 4 CHIN141 and 142 Chinese Language I and II
Computer Science A 3 IST1325 or 2335 or 3315 Introductory Programming Principles, Advanced Programming Concepts, or Object-Oriented Programming
Computer Science Principles 3 IST1301 Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
Economics Macro 3 ECO2301 Macroeconomics
Economics Micro 3 ECO2302 Microeconomics
English Language and Composition 3 ENG1301 Composition Studies
English Literature and Composition 4,5 ENG1301 and 1302 Composition Studies
Environmental Science 3 NRC1300 Man and His Environment
European History 3 HIS2311 European History 1450 to Present
European History 4 HIS2311 and 2312 European History 1450 to Present; History Elective
French Language and Culture 3 FOL1381 and 1382 Beginning French I and II
French Literature 3 FREN231 Introduction to French Literature
French Literature 4 FREN231 and 232 Introduction to French Literature I and II
German Language and Culture 3 FOL1481 and 1482 Beginning German I and II
Comparative Government and Politics 3 GOV1301 Survey of World
United States Government and Polities 3 GOV2301 National Government
Human Geography 3 GEG1303 Beginning Human Geography
Italian Language and Culture 3 ITAL141 and 142 Beginning Italian I and II
Japanese Language and Culture 3 JAPN141 Beginning Japanese I
Japanese Language and Culture 4 JAPN141 and 142 Beginning Japanese I and II
Latin 3 FOL2303 and 2304 Beginning Latin I and II
Music Theory 3 MUS1305 and 1105 Elementary Music Theory I and Lab
Physics 1 - Algebra Based 3 PHY1303 and 1103 General Physics I and Lab
Physics 2 - Algebra Based 3 PHY1304 and 1104 General Physics II and Labs
Physics C: Mechanics 3 PHY2301 and 2101 Engineering Physics I and Lab
Physics C: Mechanics 4,5 PHY2301 and 2101 PHY2302 and 2102 Engineering Physics I and II and Labs
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism 3 PHY2301 and 2101 Engineering Physics I and Lab
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism 4,5 PHY2301 and 2101

 

PHY2302 and 2102

Engineering Physics I and II and Labs
Psychology 3 PSY1300 General Psychology
Psychology 4,5 PSY1300 and 2310 General Psychology; Lifespan Human Development
Spanish Language and Culture 3,4 FOL1401 and 1402 Beginning Spanish I and II
Spanish Language and Culture 5 FOL1401 and 1402 and 2301 Beginning Spanish I and II; Intermediate Spanish I
Spanish Literature and Culture 3 FOL3301 Introduction to Latin American Life and Literature
Spanish Literature and Culture 4 FOL3301 and 3302 Introduction to Latin American Life and Literature; Introduction to Spanish Life and Literature
Statistics 3 BUA2310 Business Statistics
Studio Art 2-D Design 3 ART1305 Foundations of Design
Studio Art 3-D Design 3 ART2305 or 3308 Explorations in Media; Three-Dimensional Design
Studio Art: Drawing 3 ART1303 Drawing I
U.S. History 3 HIS2301 History of the United States I
U.S. History 4 HIS2301 and 2302 History of the United States I and II
World History 3 HIS1316 World History and Geography II
World History 4 HIS1315 and 1316 World History and Geography I and II

CLEP–College Level Examination Program–College Entrance Examination Board: Exams may be taken at any university. Official transcript from CEEB are required to award CLEP credit.

Exam Minimum Score Course ID Course Title
American Government 55 GOV2301 National Government
American Literature 53 ENG2326 American Literature I
American Literature 58 ENG2326 and 2327 American Literature I and II
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 52 ENG2329 Analyzing and Interpreting Literature I
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 55 ENG2329 and 2330 Analyzing and Interpreting Literature I and II
Biology 54 BIO1300 Human Biology
Calculus 56 MAT1402 Calculus
Chemistry 56 CHE1307 and 1107 General Chemistry I and Lab
Chemistry 65 CHE1307 and 1107 CHE1308 and 1108 General Chemistry I and II and Labs
College Algebra 53 MAT1311 College Algebra
College Composition 55 ENG1301 Composition Studies
College Composition 63 ENG1301 and 1302 College Composition; Composition and Literature
College Mathematics 55 MAT1310 College Mathematics
English Literature 52 ENG2390 English Literature
French Language 53 FOL1381 Beginning French I
French Language 56 FOL1381 and 1382 Beginning French I and II
French Language 64 FOL1381 and 1382 and 231 Beginning French I and II; Introduction to French Literature
French Language 66 FOL1381 and 1382 and 231 and 232 Beginning French I and II; Introduction to French Literature; French Literature II
German Language 54 FOL1481 Beginning German I
German Language 55 FOL1481 and 1482 Beginning German I and II
German Language 60 FOL1481 and 1482and 231 Beginning German I and II; German Literature I
German Language 66 FOL1481 and 1482and 231 and 232 Beginning German I and II; German Literature I and II
History of the United States I 54 HIS2301 History of the United States I
History of the United States II 55 HIS2302 History of the United States II
Human Growth and Development 56 PSY2310 Lifespan Human Development
Humanities 53 AFA2350 Introduction to Fine Arts I
Humanities 56 AFA2350 and 232 Introduction to Fine Arts I and II
Introduction to Educational Psychology 54 PSY 272 Educational Psychology
Introductory Business Law 56 BUS2301 Business Law
Introductory Psychology 53 PSY1300 General Psychology
Introductory Sociology 55 SOC1300 General Sociology
Natural Sciences 53 SCI141 Natural Science I
Natural Sciences 57 SCI141 and 142 Natural Science I and II
Pre-Calculus 56 MAT1313 Pre-Calculus
Principles of Financial Accounting 52 ACC2301 Principles of Accounting I
Principles of Financial Accounting 56 ACC2301 and 2302 Principles of Accounting I and II
Principles of Macroeconomics 53 ECO2301 Macroeconomics
Principles of Management 54 BUA233 Organization and Management
Principles of Marketing 56 BUA234 Principles of Marketing
Principles of Microeconomics 53 ECO2302 Microeconomics
Social Sciences and History 55 SOC231 or 232 Social Science and History; or Sociology of Bureaucracy
Social Sciences and History 58 SOC231 and 232 Social Science and History; Sociology of Bureaucracy
Spanish Language 53 FOL1401 Beginning Spanish I
Spanish Language 56 FOL1401 and 1402 Beginning Spanish I and II
Spanish Language 67 FOL1401 and 1402 and 2301 Beginning Spanish I and II; Intermediate Spanish I
Spanish Language 70 FOL1401 and 1402 and 2301 and 2302 Beginning Spanish I and II; Intermediate Spanish I and II
Western Civilization I 54 HIST141 Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II 54 HIST142 Western Civilization II

IB–International Baccalaureate: An IB diploma or certificate must be awarded from an IB member school. Official transcripts from IBO are required to receive credit. C: certificate awarded, D: diploma awarded, S: standard level, H: higher level.

EXAM 4(D) 5 (CH/DSH) 6/7 (CH/DSH)
Biology BIO 141 BIO 141 BIO 141
Chemistry CHE 1307 CHE 1307 CHE 1307
Computer Science IST 1350 IST 1350 and 131 IST 1350 and 131
Design Engineering EGR 131 EGR 131 and 132 EGR 131 and 132
Economics ECO 2301 ECO 2301 and 2302 ECO 2301 and 2302
English A1 ENG 1301 ENG 1301 and 1302 ENG 1301 and 1302
Environmental Systems NRC 2300 NRC 2300 and 2301 NRC 2300 and 2301
French B FOL 141 FOL 141 and 231 FOL 141 and 231
Geography GEG 2300 GEG 1301 and 2300 GEG 1301 and 2300
German B FOL 141 FOL 141 and 231 FOL 141 and 231
German A1 or A2 FOL 232 FOL 231 and 232 FOL 231 and 232
History, All Regions HIS 1315 HIS 1315 and 1316 HIS 1315 and 1316
History, Africa HIS 137 HIS 137 and 237 HIS 137 and 237
History, Americas HIS 132 HIS 132 and 232 HIS 132 and 232
History, East and Southeast Asia HIS 138 HIS 138 and 238 HIS 138 and 238
History, Europe HIS 136 HIS 136 and 236 HIS 136 and 236
History, West and South Asia HIS 139 HIS 139 and 239 HIS 139 and 239
Latin LAT 131 LAT 131 and 132 LAT 131 and 132
Mathematics MAT 1313 MAT 1313 and 1316 MAT 1313 and 1316
Mathematics Methods MAT 1311 MAT 1311 and 1313 MAT 1311 and 1313
Mathematics Studies MAT 1310 MAT 1310 and 1311 MAT 1310 and 1311
Music MUS 1301 MUS 1301 and 1305 MUS 1301 and 1305
Philosophy PHI 2304 PHI 2304 PHI 2304
Physics PHY 1303 PHY 1303 and 1103 PHY 1303 and 1103
Psychology PSY 1300 PSY 1300 and 132 PSY 1300 and 132
Russian B RUSN 141 RUSN 141 and 2301 RUSN 141 and 2301
Russian A1 or A2 RUSN 2301 RUSN 2301 and 2302 RUSN 2301 and 2302
Social Anthropology ANTH 236 ANTH 236 and 2376 ANTH 236 and 2376
Spanish B FOL 1402 FOL 1402 and 2301 FOL 1402 and 2301
Spanish A1 or A2 FOL 2301 FOL 2301 and 2302 FOL 2301 and 2302
Theater Arts THA 131 THA 131 and 132 THA 131 and 132
Visual Arts Design ART 1303 ART 1303 and 1352 ART 1303 and 1352
Visual Arts History ART 2307 ART 2307 and 2308 ART 2307 and 2308

Graduate Admission Standards

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Application Process

Applications for admission to Graduate Studies at the university are available on the university web site, in the Graduate Studies office, or in academic offices with graduate programs. Applications must be submitted no later than four weeks prior to the beginning of a session.

State law requires the meningitis vaccine for students, which must be received at least 10 days before but not more than 5 years before the first day of class. Students 22 years or older by the first day of class or students enrolled only in online courses are exempt. See LCU.edu/meningitis for more information.

Students entering a program to prepare for licensing or certification should be aware that a licensing or certification authority may require a criminal background check and may consider individuals with convictions or deferred adjudication for a felony or misdemeanor offense to be ineligible. Students with a concern have the right to request that the licensing authority issue a criminal history evaluation letter regarding their eligibility. For more information, consult the specific licensing or certification authority.

Unless otherwise indicated, programs preparing students for licensure or certification meet the licensing or certification requirements for the state of Texas. Applicants to these programs who plan to seek licensure or certification in a state other than Texas should confirm that the program meets requirements for licensing or certification in the state prior to enrolling.  For more information, please see the disclosures for programs leading to professional licensure or certification.

After applications are processed and required documents are received, the applicants will be notified of their admission status. Applicants are not accepted until an official letter of acceptance is issued. For further information regarding the application process, please contact the Graduate Studies office at 800.933.7601, 806.720.7599, or GraduateAdmissions@LCU.edu.

Admissions Considerations

  • The university is open to all persons regardless of race, color, gender, age, religion, national origin, or disabled condition who are otherwise eligible for admission as students.
  • To be considered for admission to distance education programs, the university must have prior state authorization to enroll students from the state the student is located in.
  • The university will exercise due diligence and may deny admission to otherwise qualified individuals who have a history that indicates their presence might endanger members of the university community.

Admission Standards

Applicants must submit an official transcript bearing a baccalaureate degree with a minimum of 120 academic hours from a regionally accredited college or university. Baccalaureate degrees earned from non-regionally accredited institutions must be evaluated to determine adequacy of preparation. Courses taken for the degree must include a minimum of 39 upper level hours. Hours awarded for life or work experience will not satisfy upper level requirements. Vocational courses will not be counted toward the 120 academic hour requirement. Evidence of grade point averages, degrees, and test scores must be on official transcripts or official score reports. Students on probation or suspension at other institutions are not eligible for admission.

Unconditional Admission

Applicants for graduate programs must also meet the following requirements for unconditional admission.

  • Demonstrated capacity for graduate-level study, as follows:
    • GPA of at least 3.0 on a baccalaureate degree,* or
    • cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 for the last 60 credit hours of baccalaureate studies, or
    • cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 in twelve or more graduate credit hours in a discipline relevant to the program for which the applicant seeks admission.
  • Favorable letter of reference from professional contact.
  • Favorable letter of reference from personal or academic contact.

* Applicants to the Graduate Certificate in Children’s Ministry offered through the Graduate School of Theology are exempt from the GPA minimum.

Additional Program Admission Requirements:

  • Graduate Business (Accounting):
    • Two letters of recommendation (one academic, one personal)
    • Demonstrate successful completion of the following undergraduate courses (or accepted equivalent courses):
      • ACC2301 Principles of Financial Accounting
      • ACC2302 Principles of Managerial Accounting
      • ACC3301 Intermediate Accounting I
      • ACC3302 Intermediate Accounting II
      • ACC3303 Cost Accounting
      • ACC3305 Special Problems in Accounting
      • ACC3320 Business Ethics for Accountants
      • ACC4305 Income Tax I, ACC4308 Auditing
      • ACC4310 Accounting Systems and Analytics. 
  • Graduate Counseling (Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis):
    • Professional resume
    • Additional professional reference
    • Interview
    • Criminal background check is necessary for counselor license.
  • Graduate Counseling (Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy emphasis):
    • Professional resume
    • Additional professional reference
    • Interview
    • Criminal background check is necessary for counselor license.
  • Graduate Counseling (Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with School Counseling emphasis):
    • Professional resume
    • Additional professional reference
    • Interview
    • Teacher certification, teaching experience, and a criminal background check is necessary to apply for licensing as a school counselor in Texas
    • Applicants who earned degrees from outside the United States must also score 26 or higher in each section of the TOEFL IBT
    • Applicants from other states should evaluate the program to determine if it is acceptable for certification in their states.
  • Graduate Education:
    • Permission of department with professional resume
    • Applicants who earned baccalaureate degrees from outside the United States must also score 26 or higher in each section of the TOEFL IBT
    • No previous misdemeanor or felony convictions. The State Board will conduct a background check prior to issuance of certification.
    • Some programs will require prior Texas teacher certification, teaching experience and additional recommendations
    • Programs meet the requirements for certification in the state of Texas.  Students interested in seeking certification in states other than Texas should notify the Director of Certification in the School of Education for more information.
  • Graduate Exercise and Sport Sciences (Master of Science in Human Performance):
    • Two letters of recommendation (one academic, one personal)
    • Demonstrate successful completion of the following undergraduate courses (or accepted equivalent courses):
      • BIO2401/2001 Human Anatomy and Physiology I with lab
      • BIO2402/2002 Human Anatomy and Physiology II with lab
      • ESS3371 Physiology of Exercise
      • Statistics (3hrs)
    • Recommend but not required completion of the following undergraduate courses (or accepted equivalent courses):
      • ESS2314 Human Movement
      • ESS3329 Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
      • ESS3340 Motor Learning and Control
      • ESS4301 Biomechanics
      • ESS4350 Principles of Strength and Conditioning
  • Graduate School of Theology (Master of Arts in Christian Ministry):
    • Additional letter of reference, to include one each: academic, professional, and personal
    • A personal essay of background and professional aims
    • Interview
    • Approval by Graduate School of Theology admissions committee
  • Graduate School of Theology (Graduate Certificate in Children’s Ministry)
    • Submission of completed Graduate Certificate in Children’s Ministry questionnaire
    • Submission of current background check
  • Graduate Nursing (Master of Science in Nursing—Education/Leadership track):
    • Official transcript from nursing school
    • Evidence of current licensure as a registered nurse
    • Completion of background check
  • Graduate Nursing (Master of Science in Nursing—Family Nurse Practitioner track) (An application evaluation scale will be used to determine applicants to be interviewed. Applications accepted September 1 – May 1):
    • Official transcript from nursing school
    • Evidence of current Texas licensure as a registered nurse
    • Completion of background check
    • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) preferred
    • 2 years full-time Registered Nurse (RN) work experience
    • Current Basic Life Support (BLS) certification
    • Submission of personal essay specifying interest in becoming a family nurse practitioner, long term-career goals, and why admission is sought in this graduate program
    • Submission of professional resume or curriculum vitae
    • Faculty interview
    • Favorable letter of reference from either a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) or Physician.
  • Graduate Nursing (Post-MSN Clinical Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)):
    • Evidence of current licensure as a registered nurse in the United States
    • Evidence of current certification as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) (Certified Nurse Midwife, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, Certified Nurse Practitioner, Certified Nurse Specialist)
    • Evidence of current employment as an Advance Practice Registered Nurse
    • Proof of current liability insurance
    • Master of Science in Nursing degree from a regionally accredited college or university with nursing program accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or accreditation from American Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), formerly the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC).
      • Completion of MSN with minimum GPA of 3.0
      • Completion of Graduate level nursing research course
    • Three letters of reference attesting to the applicant’s academic ability and leadership potential, including one from a current professional colleague
    • Personal Statement
    • Interview with DNP faculty
    • Current American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) certification
    • Current curriculum vitae or professional resume
    • Official transcripts from all institutions formerly attended.
      • NOTE: All transcripts must be from regionally accredited colleges or universities with nursing program accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or accreditation from American Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), formerly the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC).
    • Completion of criminal background check
    • Non-refundable Application Fee
    • LCU Credit Agreement

Appeals for Admission

Applicants not meeting standards for unconditional admission may submit a letter of appeal to the Graduate Studies office.

Admission for Undergraduate Students

LCU students who are within 12 hours of completing their baccalaureate degree, who meet all other graduate unconditional admission requirements, may be conditionally approved for concurrent pre-enrollment in an LCU graduate program (dependent upon graduate program requirements). Students will be prohibited from enrolling in more than 15 hours of combined graduate and undergraduate hours and will be limited to 6 graduate hours or less during the long semester.  Enrollment as a conditional student is limited to 6 graduate hours.

If eligible for financial assistance, the student will only be awarded aid for the undergraduate-level enrollment. Continued enrollment at the graduate level, re-evaluation of academic standing, and eligibility for graduate-level financial aid will be determined only upon successful posting of a baccalaureate degree.

Undergraduate students are not eligible for conditional admission to the MSN-FNP track.

Undergraduate students pursuing the 150-hour BBA/Master of Accounting (MAcc) program may be eligible to enroll in up to 6 hours of graduate coursework prior to being within 12 hours of earning a baccalaureate degree. This exception is specific for the BBA/MAcc program and acceptance is dependent upon successful completion of program prerequisite requirements and advisor recommendation. Students will be eligible for unconditional admission to the graduate-level MAcc program upon successful completion of the baccalaureate degree.

LCU undergraduate students pursuing one of the Bachelor of Science in Exercise and Sports Sciences majors, who meet all other graduate unconditional admission requirements, may have an opportunity to take up to 12 hours of graduate coursework after completion of 90 undergraduate hours, prior to completion of their bachelor’s degree. This exception is specific for the B.S. in Exercise and Sport Sciences programs and acceptance is dependent upon successful completion of program prerequisite requirements and advisor recommendation. Students will be eligible for unconditional admission to the graduate-level Master of Science in Human Performance program upon successful completion of the baccalaureate degree.

Non-Degree Admission

Individuals may apply for non-degree seeking status if desiring to transfer earned graduate hours to another institution. Non-degree admission is not available to the MSN-FNP track.

Required documentation will include:

  • Application and application fee
  • Official transcript(s) showing a bachelor’s degree and any previous graduate work
  • Students wishing to transfer graduate hours to another institution must provide a Letter of Good Standing as documentation of enrollment in a university graduate program and the approval of that university to enroll in coursework at LCU.

Students admitted with non-degree seeking status are prohibited from earning more than 12 semester hours at that status, and no more than 12 hours earned in that status can apply towards a degree, if part of the degree plan. Students admitted as non-degree seeking, are not eligible for financial assistance and must reapply for admission each enrollment period.

Readmission

Contact the Graduate Studies office.

Transfer Credit Policy

Graduate courses accepted for transfer credit must be of an appropriate level and content, and the student must have earned a grade of B or higher.

Teacher credential must also be evaluated for credit earned at non-regionally accredited institutions. 

Students may petition the department to accept:

  • up to 9 transfer hours for 30 hour master’s degrees
  • up to 12 transfer hours for 35-37 hour degrees
  • up to 15 hours for 48-49 hour degrees
  • up to 18 hours for 60 hours degrees.

Transfer credit is granted only after applicants are accepted for admission.

Application of previously earned graduate credits

All graduate credit hours earned at LCU and those accepted for transfer credit will be evaluated and applied as directed by the program coordinator or the program’s academic dean. Upon admission to most programs, graduate credits earned within the past seven years will be applied to that program’s requirements. Graduate credits older than seven years will be applied toward program electives or not counted toward the degree.

Some LCU graduate programs do not accept previously earned graduate credits, and some only accept graduate credits earned within fewer than seven years. Students who wish to appeal how previously earned graduate credits are applied must do so in writing to the program’s academic dean.

Exceptions: The MSN-FNP track and Post-MSN Certificate FNP track will only accept up to 9 hours of non-clinical based transfer credit (if credits were completed within 2 years of application to the LCU MSN-FNP or Post-MSN certificate FNP program). Transfer credit acceptance is based on the approval of the graduate nursing director. The Post-MSN Clinical DNP program does not accept transfer credit.

International Student Admission

This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll international students on F-1 status. International student immigration policies are governed by the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services of the United States Homeland Security. Federal law governs immigration requirements for applicants who are not citizens of the United States. International applicants must meet general and program admission standards to be admitted. The following additional items must be submitted to the graduate admissions office at least 60 days before the entry date. The university can issue an I-20 to immigrating international students only when all documents are received. Any costs associated with the application or for delivery of the I-20 are the responsibility of the international applicant.

It is the responsibility of the student to meet and maintain eligibility to be an international student on F-1 status. Immigration regulations change frequently. Students should contact the Designated School Official (DSO) for updates. The following additional items must be submitted to the graduate admissions office before the university can issue an I-20 to immigrating international students:

  • $200 tuition deposit
  • Copy of passport
  • Recent photograph
  • Completed health form
  • Immunization Record demonstrating required immunizations
  • Global evaluation of transcript–official transcripts from institutions outside the United States must be accompanied by official course-by-course English translation of college transcripts showing course titles, grades awarded, degree awarded, and date degrees awarded.
  • Verification of source of support
  • TOEFL English Language Test–minimum composite score of 525 on the TOEFL-CBT or 71 on the TOEFL-IBT must be achieved for admission. A score of 5.5 or higher on the IELTS will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. See following section regarding TOEFL exemptions.
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Signed F-1 Status Contract
  • Transfer Form-applies to students who have previously studied in the US

International students immigrating to the United States to attend classes must report to the Designated School Official (DSO) in the Graduate Studies office within 15 days of the program start date listed on the I-20.

International students will be required to pay the remainder of the first semester’s balance in full prior to the beginning of classes.

International Students from English Speaking Countries

English-speaking applicants from native English-speaking countries, including Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the British Caribbean Islands, Canada, Ireland, Israel, the United Kingdom, and Kenya are not required to submit TOEFL or IELTS scores.

International Student Transfers

International students transferring from another institution must apply for admission, be accepted, and request and receive a transfer in SEVIS from their former institution. Transferring international F-1 status will be issued after the release date of the former institution and students must transfer within 30 days of the release date. Transferring students must begin classes during the semester indicated in the admission letter and within five months from the release date of the prior school.

Undergraduate Academic Policies

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Students are responsible to comply with the academic policies listed in this catalog. Unfamiliarity academic policy does not constitute a valid reason for failure to comply.

Glossary

  • Semester Hours–College courses are offered for one, two, three, or four semester hour credits. Traditionally delivered three-hour courses meet three hours per week for one full semester and typically require two hours of study or preparation time for each hour in class. Courses occurring in shorter terms or courses delivered through distance education formats are designed to provide learning opportunities that are equivalent to traditionally delivered courses.
  • Course Load–Students usually take from 12 to 18 hours during a semester.
  • Full-time/Part-Time–Undergraduate students enrolled for 12 semester hours or more in a term are considered full-time. Graduate students enrolled for six hours or more in a term are considered full-time.
  • Grade Point Average (GPA)–GPA is figured by dividing total grade points by the number of hours attempted. Values assigned are, A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0 points.
  • University Core–The university core is comprised of courses that are central to the college education.
  • Academic Calendar–the official calendar that defines the start and end date for each term and communicates significant deadlines.
  • Academic Year–The academic year is composed of three long terms, fall, spring, and summer. Each term is comprised of sessions of varying lengths, including 16 week traditional length terms and short sessions of varying lengths.

Academic Integrity

Students must conduct themselves with honor and integrity. Refer to the student handbook code of academic integrity.

Grading

Final grades are recorded by faculty and available to students at the end of each enrollment period through the student information system. Grades can only be changed by written authorization of the instructor and academic dean. Grade changes must be received in the office of the registrar within one long semester after the initial grade was given.

Grade Appeals

Students appealing a grade must complete the following.

  • First, discuss the grade in question with the instructor of the course
  • If the issue is not resolved with the instructor, students may appeal to the chair of the department offering the course
  • If there is still no resolution of the problem, students may appeal to the dean of the appropriate college
  • Finally, students may appeal to the academic appeals committee

Grade appeals must be in writing and are only accepted within one semester after the grade was assigned. During the appeal, students and faculty will meet with the members of the committee to present their cases. Decisions of the academic appeals committee are final.

Letter Grades

  • A–Excellent, four grade points per hour
  • B–Good, three grade points per hour
  • C–Average, two grade points per hour
  • D–Poor, one grade point per hour

The following designations are calculated at zero grade points per hour

  • F–Failure, no credit, given for failure to meet standards for passing the course or for failing to meet university attendance requirements.
  • IP–In Progress, given at the discretion of instructors if requested by the student. When an IP is granted, students have the next consecutive term the course. For example, students receiving an IP in the spring, must complete the course before the end of the summer. If the course is not completed within the allotted time, the grade will be changed to F.
  • N–Non-credit, indicates a student took a course and completed required work and tests, but requested no credit.
  • O–Audit, indicates a student attended the class, but did not participate or complete required work.
  • P –Indicates passing credit received without academic grades or grade points. A limited number of elective courses may be annotated with the grade of P.
  • TR–Credit accepted from another university and credit by examination.
  • W–Indicates a student has withdrawn or been dropped officially during the first 2/3 of the term.

Audit

Students may audit one lecture class per term with the approval of the department chair. Courses delivered by distance education formats are not eligible for audit. Non degree seeking students, may audit courses provided the department chair approves and space is available. Auditors may be removed, if the space is needed for a student taking the course for credit. Students who audit a course are not eligible to take the same course for academic credit or seek credit for the same course through credit by exam. Students are not permitted to change a class from audit to credit or from credit to audit after the 11th class day of a semester or the 4th class day of a short term. Audit tuition is non-refundable.

Pass/Fail Grades

Students with at least 30 semester hours, a grade point average of at least 2.0, and advisor permission, may elect to take one elective course each semester on a pass/fail basis. No more than 12 total hours may be taken pass/fail. Pass/fail forms are available in the office of the registrar. Consult the academic calendar to determine the period of time when pass/fail is an option.

Adds/Drops

Students may change their course schedules, with advisor approval, before the end of the drop/add period. Students dropping or adding courses after the drop/add period expires will be charged a $25 drop/add fee per course. Courses dropped during the drop/add period will not appear on the transcript. Courses dropped after the drop/add period, but before the last day to drop with a W, will be recorded on the transcript with a grade of W. Electing not to attend classes without dropping a class will result in a grade of F. Drop/add period dates are found on the academic calendar.

Withdrawals

Students desiring to withdraw from the university must complete a withdrawal form. Withdrawal forms are available from the office of the registrar. The withdrawal process includes consulting with the office of financial assistance and the business office to determine financial implications. An appropriately executed withdrawal results in a W recorded on the transcript in lieu of a grade. In cases where a course was completed before a withdrawal, the earned grade is recorded. Students failing to complete the withdrawal process receive grades of F.

Late Enrollment

Late registration is permitted during the late registration period. Enrollment after the late registration period must be approved by the instructor(s) of record for the course(s) to be added late, as well as the student’s academic advisor and academic dean.

Classifications

  • Freshman–completed 0-29 hours of college credit
  • Sophomore–completed 30 hours of college credit
  • Junior–completed 60 hours of college credit
  • Senior–completed 90 hours of college credit
  • Post-Baccalaureate–taking courses for credit leading toward a second undergraduate degree after completion of a first degree
  • Post-Graduate–taking courses for credit or noncredit after completing a baccalaureate degree

Repeating Courses

Students wanting to raise their grade point average may repeat a course. Both grades will appear on the transcript, but the last grade received is used for the grade point average. Courses taken at other universities are not accepted to improve grade point averages.

Course Loads

Regular student loads during a semester are 12-18 hours. Students who hold jobs or who scored in the lower quarter on their entrance examination are encouraged to enroll in fewer than 15 hours during their first college semester. Students on probation must take no more than 12 hours. Students who want to take more than 18 hours must have permission from thier academic advisor and academic dean.

Bible Requirements

Students must complete a general Bible requirement to earn a baccalaureate degree. Beginning freshmen must complete a 12 hour general Bible requirement. Full-time beginning undergraduates are required to take Bible their first two semesters and are not permitted to withdraw from Bible classes without permission of the dean of the college of biblical studies. Transfer student Bible requirements are the higher of 6 hours or 10% of the hours needed to complete a baccalaureate degree rounded to the nearest 3 hour increment. Transfer Bible majors must complete a 12 hour general Bible requirement.

Chapel Attendance Requirements

Chapel attendance is mandatory for certain students. Refer to the student handbook for chapel attendance policy.

Attendance

Students are responsible for material presented in or assigned for their courses, even when they are absent from class, and will be held accountable for such material in the determination of course grades. Faculty will not apply a more restrictive attendance policy than the one outlined below:

Students who miss three, six, or nine class meetings in courses meeting once, twice, or three times per week, respectively, may, at the discretion of the professor, be dropped from the course with a grade of F. Students participating in authorized school related functions who miss more than 25% of the class meetings, may, at the discretion of the professor, be dropped from the course with a grade of F. Students will work with coaches, directors, and sponsors and their professors to keep track of their attendance and not miss more than the allotted class meetings. Students who enter the university after the starting date will accrue absences from the date the class began. Students may be required to make up any class work and/or assignments missed due to absences. Students whose absences were caused by personal illness, a death in the immediate family, or authorized participation in official school functions must be given an opportunity to rectify, in a manner acceptable to the professor, any deficiencies which may have resulted from such absences. For other reasons, professors determine whether students can rectify deficiencies. It is the responsibility of each student to inform the professor of the reason for an absence. If possible, the student should do so prior to the absence and if not, at the first attended class meeting. Students have the right to appeal dismissal using grade appeals processes outlined in the catalog. If students disrupt class, either by tardiness or by distracting noises or actions, they will be given an initial warning. Students may be dismissed from a class upon continuance of disruptive behavior, as determined by the instructor. Students have the right to appeal a class dismissal to their academic dean.

Transfer Credit Policy

Coursework submitted for transfer credit will be evaluated for equivalency by the registrar. Only courses completed with a grade of C or higher will be considered for transfer credit. The course must be of appropriate level for the degree sought and be in a content area similar to the content area of the course offered. Teacher credentials must also be evaluated for credit earned at non-regionally accredited institutions. Although the university may offer transfer credit for a particular course, such acceptance does not guarantee that the course will satisfy the requirements of a particular degree program. Students desiring to appeal the results of an evaluation may do so, in writing, to the appropriate academic dean, whose decision is final.

Academic Standards

Academic standing is based on the cumulative grade point average. Grade point averages are computed at the end of each enrollment period. Students have the right to continue their studies at the university as long as they are making satisfactory progress toward a degree and complying with all other university standards.

Academic Probation

Students who fall below the grade point average required for good academic standing will be placed on academic probation. While on academic probation students must do the following:

  • Enroll in no more than 12 hours in a semester
  • Adhere to the attendance policies
  • Suspend participation in extracurricular activities
  • Repeat course with grades of F

Students who wish to appeal any condition of this policy must submit a letter to the registrar explaining their extenuating circumstances. The registrar will forward the letter to the academic appeals committee. The academic appeals committee will review the circumstances and determine whether or not academic probation should be enforced. The decision of the academic appeals committee is final. At the end of a semester of probation, students who have not earned at least a 2.0 grade point average are placed on academic suspension.

Good Academic Standing

Students are considered in good academic standing when all admission requirements have been met and they maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.

Academic Suspension

Students are placed on academic suspension for the following reasons.

  • Failing all their courses in the fall or spring semesters
  • Failing to achieve good academic standing after a semester on academic probation

The term academic suspension refers to a period of time when, for academic reasons, students may not enroll in classes at the university. Students on academic suspension may enroll if their circumstances meet one of the following guidelines.

  • They have served a suspension period extending through one fall or spring semester
  • Their suspension occurred at the end of the spring semester and they elected to attend summer school while on continued probation. With this option, students must enroll for a minimum of 6 hours. At the end of the summer, if they have earned the required cumulative grade point average, they will be eligible to enroll in the fall. If not, their suspension will continue until the end of the fall semester.

Academic Suspension Appeal Procedure

To appeal a suspension, students must submit a letter to the registrar explaining any extenuating circumstances that may have contributed to the problems resulting in their suspension. This letter will be forwarded to the academic appeals committee, which will hear appeals during one of the regular committee meetings in August or January to determine whether any suspensions should be lifted or enforced. The decision of the academic appeals committee is final. Students desiring to enroll at the university after a third academic suspension must petition the academic appeals committee for reinstatement before enrolling. The committee will hear the appeal during the regular meeting dates in August and January. Students who are readmitted must meet with the committee to petition for reinstatement following any subsequent suspension. Students whose appeal is denied may not enroll again for undergraduate credit. Students appealing to enroll after a third academic suspension, who subsequently have their appeal denied by the committee, may appeal in writing to the provost. The decision of the provost is final.

Assessment of Academic Proficiency

Students should complete UNI2000 in the first semester after completing 60 semester hours. To enroll in UNI2000, students must be in good academic standing and have completed or will concurrently complete the following courses.

  • ENG1301 and 1302
  • 3 hours from HIS
  • ESS1200
  • MAT1311 or a higher level course
  • 6 hours of Bible or 3 hours if admitted with 30 or more credit hours
  • 3 hours from COM
  • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC, or PHY

Successful completion of UNI2000 is a University Core requirement.

Texas Higher Education Assessment for Education Majors

The Texas Higher Education Assessment exam is required for admission to the educator certification program. Students who plan to become teachers should consider taking the exam during their freshman year so they can be assured of having met the minimum score requirements on all sections of the exam prior to their application to the educator certification program. Please refer to the educator certification program section of this catalog for further information about the THEA and other educator certification requirements. THEA registration booklets are available in the testing office.

Major Changes

Students changing majors must complete a change of major form and submit to the office of the registrar. Changes of major must be approved by the student and the losing and gaining department.

University Core Curriculum

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The purpose of the university core is to prepare students with college-level competencies and values. Students completing the core curriculum will have a foundation in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. College-level competencies include the following.

  • Critical thinking–distinguish between rhetoric and argumentation; recognize assumptions; recognize best hypothesis; infer and interpret relationships between variables; and draw valid conclusions.
  • Writing–recognize grammatically correct clause of sentence; organize language for coherence and rhetorical effect; recognize and reword figurative language; and organize elements of writing into larger groups of meaning.
  • Reading–interpret meaning of key terms; recognize primary purpose of a passage; recognize explicitly presented information; make appropriate inferences; and recognize rhetorical devices.
  • Mathematics–recognize and interpret mathematical terms; read and interpret tables and graphs; evaluate formulas; order and compare large and small numbers; interpret ratios, proportions, and percentages; read scientific measuring instruments; and recognize and use equivalent mathematical formulas or expressions.

See each degree program for specific core course requirements.

University Core

(45 hours)

Bible (12 hours)

  • BIB 1310 Introduction to the Old Testament
  • BIB 1320 Introduction to the New Testament
  • BIB 3305 Christian Heritage
  • BIB 3310 Christian Life

Written and Oral Communication (9 hours)

  • ENG 1301 Composition Studies
  • ENG 1302 Composition and Literature
  • COM 2340 Communication for the Professional

Human and Social Science (12 hours)

  • 3 hours from PSY 1300 General Psychology or SOC 1300 General Sociology
  • 3 hours from HIS
  • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
  • ESS 1200 Personal Fitness and Wellness
  • UNI 1170 University Seminar
  • UNI 2000 University Skills

Natural and Physical Sciences (6 hours)

  • MAT 1311 College Algebra
  • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC, or PHY

Cultural Awareness (6 hours)

  •  6 hours from  AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL

First-time beginning undergraduates must take UNI 1170 (University Seminar) during their first semester of attendance. Students transferring to the university with post-secondary transfer credit totaling 30 or more hours are exempt from UNI 1170 (University Seminar).

Transfer students must take a Bible courses at the university equal to 10% of the courses taken at the university but no fewer than 6 hours.

Requirements for Associate Degrees

  • Completion of 60 semester hours or more depending on the prescribed requirements
  • Achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.00
  • Complete at least 25% of hours required for the degree in residence
  • Completion of course requirements and examinations specified by the major department and the university
  • Completion of an application for graduation, submitted to the office of the registrar before the deadline
  • Requirements for the degree must be completed within 7 years of original enrollment in the university

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

  • Completion of 120 semester hours or more, depending on the prescribed requirements. At least 39 hours must be from upper level courses
  • Achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.00
  • Completion of at least 25% of the hours required for the degree from the university. Residency requirement must be completed after achieving senior status and at least 15 of the hours required for residency must be upper level
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing students must complete at least 25% of their hours at the university
  • Completion of major courses with a GPA of at least 2.0
  • At least 18 hours of the major must be from upper level courses
  • Completion of course requirements and examinations specified by the major department and the university
  • Completion of an application for graduation, submitted to the office of the registrar by the deadline
  • Requirements for the degree must be completed within seven years of original enrollment at the university
  • Students seeking a second baccalaureate degree must complete the requirements for both degrees and earn a minimum of 24 semester hours in addition to those required for the first degree

Requirements for Minors

Minors are a cohesive set of courses selected to complement a major or to explore areas of interest unrelated to a major. Students are not eligible to pursue minors in the same discipline as their majors. Completion of an approved application for a minor must be submitted to the office of the registrar before the deadline to apply for graduation.

  • Completion of 18 semester hours or more from a specific area of study, 9 of which must be upper level
  • No more than 12 transfer hours may be counted towards a minor
  • Completion of minor courses with at least a 2.0 GPA except for the Honors Minor which requires a 3.0 GPA

Graduation Commitment

It is the responsibility of students to know their academic plan and to register for and complete courses that fulfill the academic plans. Degrees will be awarded only when students satisfactorily complete the conditions of their academic plans and meet all other requirements for earning a degree. Students must complete the application for graduation when registering for their last semester. Students have one year from the intended graduation date to complete the graduation requirements; if they do not complete graduation requirements within one year, they must re-apply for graduation. Students needing longer periods of time must secure dean approval.

To participate in commencement exercises, students must have successfully completed, or be currently enrolled in and completing, all program requirements for the degree during the term in which they intend to graduate.

Graduating Catalog

Students are entitled to graduate under the curriculum of the catalog in effect at the time of their first completed semester of enrollment with the following exceptions.

  • Students may not use a catalog older than seven years
  • Students who interrupt their enrollment, for reasons other than involuntary military service, for more than one calendar year shall be covered by the catalog in effect at the time of the re-entry
  • Students who change their major from one department to another within the university shall be governed by the degree requirements that are in effect at the time the change of major becomes effective

Academic Honors and Awards

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President's List

Undergraduate students are named to the President’s list when they complete at least 12 hours with a 4.0 grade point average and successfully complete any courses taken Pass/Fail. Students with incomplete grades are not eligible.

Dean's List

Undergraduate students who complete at least 12 hours, achieve a 3.5-3.99 grade point average, and pass all courses taken Pass/Fail are named to the Dean’s List. Students with incomplete grades are not eligible.

Latin Honors Designations for Graduates

An undergraduate student completing a degree with at least 60 credit hours earned at LCU may be eligible for Latin Honors designation based on the following grade point average (GPA) criteria. GPA is calculated based on credit hours earned at LCU only.

  • Cum Laude                   3.60
  • Magna Cum Laude      3.75
  • Summa Cum Laude     3.90

The commencement program is printed prior to graduation and will reflect honors status achieved through the last semester completed prior to the graduation term. Final honors levels will reflect on the transcript and diploma.  Latin honors printed in commencement programs are considered pending until the official transcript and diploma reflect final GPA and Latin honors.

Honors College Graduates

Honors students who successfully complete the Honors College Graduate course requirements will graduate as Honors College Graduates.

Honors College Scholars

Honors students who successfully complete the Honors College Scholar course requirements will graduate as Honors College Scholars.

Bronze Medals

Each department has the option of awarding two bronze medals to outstanding students in their fields.

Silver Medals

Silver medals are awarded to individuals who make outstanding contributions to the university.

Gold Medals

For the Trustees Award, the faculty selects the senior male and female students who best represent the ideals of the university. For the President’s Award, the faculty selects the male and female students who evidence the greatest promise of spiritual service. The dean’s award goes to the graduating student of each college with the highest grade point average. The student body and faculty choose Mister and Miss Lubbock Christian University, as representatives of the ideals of the university.

Stoles and Cords

Commencement regalia should enhance the academic focus of commencement.  Stoles worn at commencement will be limited to those designated by the Honors College.  Cords will be allowed according to the following criteria:

  • Cords representing an Academic Society or Department Majors society:
    • Approved if the society is in good standing in the Association of College Honor Societies (ACHS)
    • Subject to review if the society is not a member in good standing with ACHS
  • Cords representing a co-curricular or related society:
    • Society must have an integral relationship to academics and the collegiate learning experience
    • Must relate to an established organization
    • Subject to a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher for the graduate.
  • Ethnic or other heritage or identity related cords (e.g. Hispanic heritage, national heritage, Native American heritage, etc.)
    • Use of these types of cords is discouraged but not prohibited
    • Cords are subject to approval by the Academic Protocol Committee

Certain types of cords are prohibited, cords representing membership in professional, fraternal, or community organizations, or cords representing an organization not associated ACHS.

Graduate Academic Policies

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Students registering for classes at the university are responsible for complying with the academic regulations of the university catalog. The academic policies outlined in this section are applicable to all programs. Some programs have Handbooks with additional requirements.  Students must comply with the academic requirements for their Graduate Program. Unfamiliarity with these regulations does not constitute a valid reason for failure to comply. If there are questions, students should ask their advisor, the registrar, or the academic dean.

Good Academic Standing

  • Good academic standing is maintained with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0.
  • Grade point averages are computed at the end of each semester.
  • Students have the right to continue their studies at the university as long as they are in good academic standing, are making satisfactory progress toward a degree, and are complying with other university standards.

Academic Probation

  • Students failing to maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA for graduate work will be placed on academic probation.
  • Students on academic probation have one semester to raise their cumulative GPA to 3.0. A semester is a term of 13-16 weeks.

Academic Suspension

  • Students on academic probation who fail to raise their cumulative GPA to 3.0 within one semester will be placed on academic suspension and prohibited from enrolling in graduate courses for one semester.
  • Students will also be placed on academic suspension after failing all courses in a semester. A semester is a term of 13-16 weeks.

Academic Suspension Appeal Procedure

  • Students appealing academic suspension must reapply and submit a letter to the office of Graduate Studies explaining all extenuating circumstances.
  • The application and letter will be reviewed by the Graduate Council.
  • The decision of the Graduate Council is final.

Application after two academic suspensions

Students with a second academic suspension may not enroll in any LCU graduate course until two full academic years (six academic semesters) have elapsed since their last suspension. Direct inquiries for reinstatement to graduate studies to the office of graduate studies.

Program Policies

Some programs have Handbooks with program specific requirements. Please see the advisor for information. What follows are policies common to all graduate studies programs.

Academic Integrity

The university expects its students to conduct themselves with a level of honor and integrity befitting members of a Christian learning community, and in keeping with the university mission. The Code of Academic Integrity, which includes the appeals process, is found in the Student Handbook.

Leveling

Graduate students are expected to demonstrate appropriate competencies in the academic discipline to which they are applying. Students changing disciplines may be required to complete leveling work of up to 18 upper-division hours in the new academic discipline.

Grading System

  • A–Excellent, four grade points per hour
  • B–Good, three grade points per hour
  • C–Marginal, two grade points per hour

The following are calculated at zero grade points per hour.

  • F–Failure, no credit. Given any time when students are dropped by their instructors or do not officially withdraw from the course.
  • P—Pass, to indicate passing score for comprehensive exams or internship/practicums.
  • PR– In Progress. PR may be requested by the student but is assigned only at the discretion of the instructor. Assignment of PR must be preceded by a PR Course Completion Contract being prepared and signed by the instructor and the student. PR Course Completion Contracts must first be approved by the academic chair and dean. It is the responsibility of the student to see that a PR is removed and a grade is assigned. A PR cannot be permanently left on the transcript. Students have no more than 8 weeks to remove the PR or a grade of F is assigned.
  • TR–Credit accepted from another university
  • W–Withdrew, indicates students have officially withdrawn from a class or from a semester... See academic calendar for last day to withdraw.

Note: Grades lower than a C will not be recognized for graduate credit.

Grade Point Average

The GPA is a system for assigning a numerical average to student grade averages. Under this system, A is 4, B is 3, C is 2, and F is 0 points. If students earn an A in a three-hour course, 12 grade points are earned (4 points multiplied by 3 hours equals 12). The grade points from each course are totaled and then divided by the number of hours attempted.

Grading Changes

A grade can be corrected or changed with the written authorization from the teacher of record and the academic dean. A statement explaining the reason for the correction or change must accompany the written authorization. Grade changes should be received in the office of the registrar within one semester after the initial grade was given. Final grades are available to students in the student information system.

Grade Appeals

After final grades for an enrollment period are entered, students may appeal a grade within two weeks into the following enrollment period. The procedure for appealing a grade is as follows.

  • Students must first visit with the instructor of the course to learn how the grade was determined.
  • If disagreement still exists, students may submit a written request to the academic dean within two weeks from the date of meeting with the teacher. The dean will arrange a meeting with the chair, instructor, and student.
  • If disagreement continues, student may submit a letter to the provost requesting a formal appeal of the grade within two weeks of the meeting arranged by the dean. The provost will convene the Graduate Council.
  • The Graduate Council will set a time to hear from the student and the teacher concerning the grade dispute. The hearing will take place no later than 30 days from the date of the letter requesting a formal appeal. Legal counsel will not be permitted during the appeal process.
  • The Graduate Council will presume the grade was determined in a fair and appropriate manner, and is correct. The Graduate Council will not reevaluate assignments. The student has the burden to show the grade was unfairly determined.
  • The decision of the Graduate Council is final.

Class Changes

Students enrolling during advance registration may change their class schedules prior to the first day of class without penalty. Class changes consist of adding classes, dropping classes, or canceling all classes. Students who want to cancel their classes must contact the registrar prior to the first day of class. Schedule changes after classes begin must be completed within the drop/add period. Students dropping or adding classes after the drop/add period will be charged a $25 drop/add fee per course. Courses dropped after the drop/add period but before the last day to drop with a W, will receive a grade of W. Drop/add period dates are found on the academic calendar. To drop or add classes, a request, approved by both student and advisor, must be provided to the registrar. Students who elect to leave without formally withdrawing will be given a grade of F.

Withdrawal

Students desiring to withdraw from the university must complete a withdrawal form. Withdrawal forms are available from the office of the registrar. The withdrawal process includes consulting with the office of financial assistance and the business office to determine financial implications. An appropriately executed withdrawal results in a W recorded on the transcript in lieu of a grade. In cases where a course was completed before a withdrawal, the earned grade is recorded. Students failing to complete the withdrawal process receive grades of F.

Repeating Courses

Students wishing to raise their GPA may repeat a course at Lubbock Christian University. Both grades will appear on the permanent record, but the last grade received is used to calculate the GPA. For information on financial aid eligibility for repeated courses, check the Graduate Financial Assistance section of this catalog or consult personnel in the Office of Financial Assistance.

Class Attendance

Failure to attend classes results in fewer learning opportunities. Absences must be explained to the satisfaction of the instructor. Acceptance of late work is up to the instructor. Students disrupting class may be dismissed from class. Students dismissed from class may appeal to the academic dean.

Requirements for Graduate Degree

  • Completion of 30 semester hours or more, depending on program
  • Achieve an overall GPA of at least 3.0
  • Completion of at least a majority of courses from the university. Refer to the Transfer Credit Policy for specifics.
  • Completion of course requirements and examinations specific to the degree sought
  • Completion of an application for graduation, submitted to the office of the registrar, by the deadline
  • Requirements for a degree requiring less than 40 hours must be completed within six years of initial enrollment in the program. Degrees requiring 40-60 hours have an eight year time limit. Exceptions to time limits must be approved by the academic dean.
  • Applicable requirements are those established by the catalog in effect at the time students enter the program, or those of any subsequent catalog edition, provided that degree requirements are completed within the time limit.

Comprehensive Examination and Portfolio Requirements

Candidates for a graduate degree must pass a written comprehensive examination, capstone course with competency examinations, and/or complete a portfolio assignment prior to graduation, depending on program requirements. Specific culminating capstone, project, portfolio, or examination requirements are communicated by the academic program.

For programs requiring comprehensive examination: the examination may be taken during the last semester of course work, but it must be taken no later than thirty days following the completion of required course work. The specific examination will be prepared under the guidance of the advisor who will consult the members of the graduate faculty teaching in the discipline. At least two members of the graduate faculty will grade the written examination. Students who fail the examination must retake the examination or meet corrective stipulations established by the graduate faculty. Permission to take the comprehensive examination a third time must be approved by the advisor and the academic dean.

Second Master's Degree in the Same Discipline

Students are not permitted to pursue two master’s degrees concurrently. Students holding a master's degree from the university may request that a portion of the hours from their first master's degree be applied to the second master's degree. Courses must directly apply to the second master's degree and be approved by the advisor. The maximum number of hours applicable to the second master's degree varies by program. In 30 hour master’s programs, up to 9 hours may be applied toward the second degree. In 35-37 hour master’s programs, up to 12 hours may be applied. In 48-49 hour master’s programs, 15 hours may be applied.

Degree Plan

It is the responsibility of students to know their academic plan and to register for and complete courses that fulfill the academic plans. Degrees will be awarded only when students satisfactorily complete the conditions of their academic plans and meet all other requirements for earning a degree. Students must complete the application for graduation when registering for their last semester.

To participate in commencement exercises, students must have successfully completed, or be currently enrolled in and completing, all program requirements for the degree during the term in which they intend to graduate.

Student Services

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Center for Student Success

The Center for Student Success is committed to helping students succeed by providing tutoring services, academic advising, mentoring, testing, and services for students with disabilities. The Center for Student Success is located in the Center for Academic Achievement building.

Accessibility Services

The University is a member of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and is committed to providing appropriate accommodations for students under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The Office of Accessibility Services, located in room 117 of the Diana Ling Center for Academic Achievement, strives to ensure equal access to all students. Qualified individuals with disabilities may request accommodations through the Office of Accessibility Services 806.720.7156 or AccessibilityServices@LCU.edu. The Accessibility Services Coordinator is Larunda Creel (Larinda.Creel@LCU.edu) 806.720.7156.

Academic Testing

Credit-by-exam opportunities are offered through CLEP, DSST, and end-of-course exams. See the advanced credit section of the catalog for more information.

Counseling Services

Lubbock Christian University is committed to providing counseling assistance for students struggling with academic pressures, family conflicts, relationship difficulties, career indecision, spiritual struggles, substance abuse and other problems. Students seeking counseling services are entitled to limited personal counseling each semester. The director of the Counseling Center is a Licensed Professional Counselor who adheres to the ethical standards of the profession. Counselors follow the strictest standards in regards to confidentiality and privacy, and measures are taken to protect all confidential counseling records. The Counseling Center is located upstairs in the Mabee Student Life Building.

Drug Policy and Education Program

The University drug policy is published annually in the student handbook. The Student Handbook is distributed to students during registration and is available on the University website. When University officials have reason to suspect that drugs are being used, the University reserves the right to drug test individuals and/or contact appropriate law enforcement officials. A substance abuse unit is incorporated in the core curriculum course ESS 1200 Personal Fitness and Wellness. One chapel program each year includes a presentation on substance abuse. During registration, students will receive information containing the policy on substance abuse and rules governing such abuse.

Health and Safety

The campus Public Safety operates 24 hours a day, 365 day a year. Public Safety officers enforce university regulations with respect to parking, alcohol, and drugs, and conduct other campus security functions. The university has an emergency notification system, which contacts students and university personnel by e-mail, text message, and telephone. The university uses the emergency contact information provided upon registration. Students are responsible for updating their emergency contact information through the student information system.

Global Campus

Lubbock Christian University offers multiple semester-long experiences for off-campus study abroad.  The Office of Global Campus can apprise students of these various opportunities, the application process, and requirements. Students should be aware that some semester-long academic experiences (e.g. internships through LCU Washington) are offered for upper-level students, while others, such as Study Abroad in Ávila, Spain, are designed with sophomore-level students in mind.

Students engaging in semester-long study abroad experiences will coordinate with the faculty advisors to obtain prior necessary courses substitutions where needed for study abroad classes within their academic degree plans. Those students who are interested in sophomore Study Abroad in Ávila, Spain should visit with their faculty advisors during their freshmen year to identify and set aside courses in their academic plans that will be offered in Spain.

Faculty advisors and LCU professors of related courses will work with the Office of Global Campus and Study Abroad faculty as necessary to identify and provide for reasonable course substitutions for semester-long study abroad courses. Faculty advisors will coordinate with the Office of the Registrar to aid students in identifying  the most appropriate placement for substitutions within the academic plan. Some pre-professional degrees include stringent certification requirements that do not allow for flexibility of substitution. Students enrolled in these programs should consult their advisors.

Library

The university library provides learning resources to support university curricular offerings and assists with student research needs. Library holdings include over 125,000 books, 98,000 e-books, 240 print journal subscriptions, 40,000 full text journals, and 70 databases. Checkout privileges are available to students for a three week period. Librarians provide research instruction to classes and individual students. The University Library is located at the northeast corner of the university mall. Library resources and services are also available online.

Medical Clinic

The University has a medical clinic, with a full-time, on-site, licensed physician serving as the director of the clinic. The clinic is well equipped and staffed to handle the minor medical problems of university students, including acute illnesses and minor injuries, as well as maintenance therapy for certain chronic health conditions. The physician can assist with referrals to specialists in the Lubbock medical community when needed. There are several major hospitals and urgent care centers within 15 minutes of the University for emergencies or after-hours medical needs. The medical clinic is located on the second floor of the Mabee Student Life Building.

Office of Student Professional Development

The office of Student Professional Development aids students through the professional development process through career assessment, career research, career advising, instruction in in resume writing, and interviewing skills. The office of Student Professional Development is located in the Christa Dobbs School of Business suite.

Release of Information

The university will release directory information about students from its records in accordance with The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA). For additional guidance on this subject, please refer to FERPA: The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act of 1974, and the Public Notification of Directory Information sections of the Student Handbook.

Student Life

Students participate in more than 25 student organizations, planned student activities, chapel, devotionals, co-curricular learning opportunities, attending intercollegiate games, or meeting friends at the student center, cafeteria, library, coffee bar, or in the mall. Recreational life is enhanced by a 70,000 square foot recreation facility which includes top of the line exercise equipment, intramural sports courts, and a climbing wall in the Rhodes-Perrin Recreational Center.

Student Conduct

The University provides an academic and social environment consistent with Christian principles. Students are responsible to follow the standards communicated in the student handbook and local, state, or federal laws. Students living in campus housing must uphold the policies of campus housing communicated in the Residential Life Guide. The university reserves the right to place students on probation or suspend or dismiss students for violating university standards of conduct.

The Student Handbook, Residential Life Guide, and this Catalog constitute a written agreement as to conduct and discipline while students are at Lubbock Christian University.

Student Mentoring

Mentors are available year-round to encourage students. Mentors are experienced in the stresses of college life and understand the difficulties associated with the transition to college life. Mentoring is available anytime without an appointment in the Center for Student Success.

Technology Support (ChapDesk)

Students can access the ChapDesk for help with authentication, printing issues, or any other technology support issue during their extended business hours (LCU: Technology). ChapDesk also provides technology self-help resources and after-hours support resources via Chaplink. Students enrolled in online courses and academic programs also have access to technology support resources on Moodle. Course materials and academic resources are also incorporated into the course management system for online courses and degree programs.

Tutoring Services

LCU offers peer tutoring for undergraduate courses at no additional cost for students. Students can request tutoring for any course(s) in the Center for Student Success. Tutoring sessions are usually scheduled for one hour per week in an individual or group tutoring session.

Student Financial Policies

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The university offers the following resources for payment of accounts.

  • In the Student Portal (my.lcu.edu) students can:
    • View account summary–24/7 real time updates for student accounts and financial assistance
    • Make a payment or evaluate available payment options–make a one-time payment using E-Check or Credit/Debit Cards, or enroll in a payment plan. Credit or Debit card payments include a service fee.
    • Share account access–students may share access using "Invite User" feature in the "My Profile" tab.
  • Checks, money orders, cashier checks and cash are accepted in the Student Business Office and by mail at: Student Business Office, 5601 19th St, Lubbock, TX 79407.
  • International payments are accepted from www.pay.flywire.com.
  • Students should apply for financial assistance before the payment due date. Students can expedite receipt of stipends by completing a direct deposit form, which is accessible on the student portal.

Other services provided by the Student Business Office include the following.

  • Printing account–students may add money to their campus printing account.
  • Assist students in setting up direct deposit and processing checks for student employment
  • Provide 1098T tax forms (given to students only)
  • Resolving additional fees

Note: Students must authorize Student Business Office personnel to discuss student accounts with other individuals, including parents by filling out a FERPA form, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, located on the student portal.

Payment of Account

Undergraduate student account balances must be settled by paying in full, covered entirely with Financial Aid or a payment plan in place on or before August 17th for the fall and January 5th for the spring. Graduate student account balances for Fall C1 and C2 sessions must be settled on or before August 17th and C3 sessions by October 11th, and balances for Spring C1 and C2 sessions must be paid on or before January 5th and C3 sessions by March 1st. Payment for summer courses must be made by the first day of class. Accounts not complying with the above policy will be denied on campus move in, receive a late fee and/or have classes removed.  The university does not release student academic records if educational costs are not paid. Students will not be allowed to register for classes if there is a hold on the account. Late fees will not be assessed to students current on a payment plan.

Tuition and room and board refunds are computed on a declining scale based on when students withdraw from the university or drop a course. Fees are not refundable. 

After the last day to Drop/Add a class (published on the Academic Calendar for the term), requests for drops must be made by completing a withdrawal or drop form, available in the Office of the Registrar. Fees associated with dropping or adding a class are published with institutional tuition and fee information. Students are responsible for fees associated with schedule changes when changes occur.

Sixteen Week Terms

  • 1st through 7th day of term–100%
  • 8th through 14th day of term–50%
  • 15th through final day of term–0%

Eight Week Sessions

  • 1st through 3rd day of session–100%
  • 4th through 6th day of session–50%
  • 7th through final day of session–0%

Less than Eight Week Sessions

  • 1st day of session–100%
  • 2nd day of session–50%
  • 3rd day through final day of session–0%

Tuition Refund Insurance

Tuition refund insurance is available through GradGuard to protect educational investments. The insurance refunds tuition, fees, and room and board charges up to the annual policy limit of $10,000, if the policy holder is unable to complete the semester due to a covered medical reason. Premium payments are due to GradGuard for students who select this insurance, prior to the first day of classes. For more information, visit GradGuard.

Cancellations

Cancellations occur when registration is cancelled prior to the first day of the term. Requests for cancellations must be communicated to the registrar. Pre-booked travel/trip expenses are not refundable for cancellations.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and Fee grids are available from the LCU.edu website to assist students in estimating the cost of attendances based on enrolled semester credit hours. LCU reserves the right, without notice in this or any other publication, to change, amend, add to, or otherwise alter any or all fees, dues, or rates subject to authorization by the LCU Board, the Executive Leadership Team or Collaborative Dean and Chief Financial Officer approval.

Undergraduate Financial Assistance

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Types of Financial Assistance

Financial assistance falls under three general categories.

  • Grants and scholarships–free money that does not require repayment
  • Educational loans–money that must be repaid
  • Student employment–money that must be earned

Grants

Grants are available from the State of Texas or the federal government to students who demonstrate financial need and who otherwise qualify. Grants do not have to be repaid.

Academic Scholarships

Students may qualify to receive institutional or funded scholarships based on their academic performance. For beginning students, their academic achievement is determined by their scores on the ACT composite score, the total of the SAT critical reading and math scores, or high school GPA. For returning or transferring students, their cumulative GPA determines academic achievement. In order to keep an academic scholarship, students must maintain the minimum required GPA. Scholarships will be lost or reduced for students achieving a GPA below the minimum. Any student receiving an institutional scholarship must be enrolled for at least 12 hours per semester or the scholarship will be cancelled. Academic scholarships are applied during the fall and spring semesters.

Incoming freshmen that receive intercollegiate athletic scholarships and achieve at least a 22 on the ACT, 1110 on the SAT, or high school GPA of 3.50 or higher on a 4.0 scale, may also receive academic scholarships. Transfers that receive intercollegiate athletic scholarships and achieve at least a 3.00 GPA on transferable credit may also receive academic scholarships.

Intercollegiate Athletic Scholarships

The university offers intercollegiate athletic scholarships for men's baseball, women's basketball, men's basketball, cheerleading, women's cross country and track, men's cross country and track, women's golf, men's golf, women's soccer, men's soccer, women's softball, men's tennis, women's tennis, and women's volleyball. For more information, contact the coach. See contact information at LCUchaps.com.

Externally Funded Scholarships

Scholarships from non-university sources must be reported to financial assistance.

Discounts

Most discounts cannot be combined with academic scholarships during the same semester. Contact financial assistance for more information on using discounts and academic scholarships.

Institutional Aid

In order to keep institutional scholarships or discounts, students must maintain a required GPA. Scholarships and discounts will be lost or reduced for students achieving a GPA below the minimum.

Loans

Loans are based on the financial need of the student and the availability of funds from the federal government, lending institutions, and other organizations. Loans must be repaid upon graduation or when students leave the university. Although most loans are made directly to students, some loans are made to parents of dependent students.

Federal Work Study

The purpose of the federal work study program is to provide jobs for students who have financial need and who wish to earn part of their educational expenses. When federal work study eligibility is awarded, the amount awarded is a maximum amount that can be earned in federal work study employment. Students who are qualified for the federal work study program must seek and secure the job, coordinate their working hours, and work the hours necessary to earn their federal work study allocation. Federal work study students must complete an I-9, W-4, and a work contract before beginning work on campus. To complete the I-9, students must be able to establish their identity and eligibility to work, which may include driver's license or birth certificate. Students working in the federal work study program earn the federal minimum wage and are paid monthly. Students may not work more than 15 hours per week on the federal work study program. Students may choose to have a portion of their earnings credited to their account. Students must be enrolled in at least 6 hours per semester to be eligible to earn any funds from this program.

Financial Assistance Awarding Procedures

In order to be considered for financial assistance, students must first apply for financial assistance. Financial assistance will only be disbursed when the financial assistance folder is complete, including each document requested by the financial assistance, admissions, and registrar offices. Student accounts are credited at the beginning of each enrollment period. State grant funds will not be credited until they are approved by the State of Texas, usually after September 1 for the fall semester, but later than the semester start date. Awards will be based on the number of hours for which a student is enrolled at the beginning of the enrollment period and the awards will be modified if the enrollment status changes.

Deadlines

New students must have their financial assistance applications and files completed by June 1. Returning student files must be complete by May 15. Applications will be processed after that date only if funds are still available. Students applying for summer assistance must have their financial assistance files complete by May 1.

Class Drops

Students are awarded financial assistance based upon the number of hours in which they are enrolled. Students are considered full, three-fourths, or half time. For example, students enrolling for 12 hours and dropping a 3-hour class could have their grants and scholarships canceled or reduced as well as become subject to probation or suspension. The institutional refund policy is available in the student business office.

Withdrawals

Students withdrawing from the university may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition and room and board for that semester–see refund policy in the catalog. If students receive financial assistance, then a portion of the assistance may need to be returned to the grant, scholarship, or loan source from which that assistance was received. Information about the return of Title IV fund requirements is available in the office of the registrar. Students intending to withdraw must begin the withdrawal process in the office of the registrar.

Grade of F in All Courses During an Enrollment Period

When a student begins a semester by attending classes but does not earn a passing grade in at least one class or fails to officially withdraw, the institution must assume that the student has unofficially withdrawn unless it can document that the student completed the enrollment period. A student who unofficially withdraws and receives all F’s will be placed on Financial Assistance Suspension immediately.

Incompletes

Grades in progress are figured as zero grade points in the GPA. Students are responsible for notifying financial assistance of changes in their transcript after an IP is removed. When an IP is not removed by the end of the following semester, the IP is changed to an F.

Repeats

Students repeating a course for the first time that was previously passed will be eligible for financial assistance. Students repeating a course that was previously failed may be eligible for financial assistance until the course is passed.

Taking Courses not Required for Degree

Students are responsible for enrolling in courses in their degree plan and must notify financial assistance if enrolling in courses outside of their degree plan. Enrolling in courses not required for a degree may affect eligibility for aid.

Eligibility for Financial Assistance

To be eligible for financial assistance, students must maintain satisfactory progress. Financial assistance recipients will be evaluated at the end of each payment period (period of enrollment). Satisfactory progress is divided into two categories, (1) cumulative grade point average, and (2) hours successfully completed. The cumulative grade point average is figured on hours completed at Lubbock Christian University only. However, all hours are counted to determine hours completed.

Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.00.

Minimum Completion Rate Requirements

Each payment period, students must complete at least 75% of all credit hours attempted. The completion rate is calculated by dividing the total number of completed hours by the number of hours attempted, which is based upon enrolled hours at the end of the 100% drop refund period (usually 5 days into the payment period). Check the refund policy for specific dates for each period of enrollment.

When financial assistance recipients fail to meet the cumulative GPA requirements and/or successfully complete the proper number of hours at the end of a payment period, they will be placed on financial assistance warning or suspension, as appropriate. Students are notified in writing if placed on warning or suspension. Student records are also coded to indicate their current financial assistance status.

The quantitative standards apply to full-time students. Students taking less than a full-time course load are required to complete every hour enrolled. Students must maintain the qualitative and quantitative standards and are limited to a time frame of availability of financial assistance. This time frame is 150% of the time usually required to complete a degree program. For example, students enrolled in four year degree programs are eligible for financial assistance for six years.

Financial Assistance Warning

When students fail to meet the required cumulative GPA and/or successfully complete the proper number of hours for a semester, they will be placed on financial assistance warning for the next payment period. Students must meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) by the end of the warning period. If students fail to meet the requirements, they will be in danger of losing their financial assistance. Transfer students with a cumulative GPA below the minimum standard will enter the university on financial assistance warning.

Financial Assistance Suspension and Appeals

If, during a period of financial assistance warning, students fail to meet the required GPA and/or successfully complete the required number of hours, they will be placed on financial assistance suspension and will be ineligible for aid. Information regarding the appeal process is provided to students in writing after records are reviewed at the end of each payment period. Where extraordinary circumstances exist, students may appeal in writing their suspension to the director of financial assistance. The appeal will be presented to the financial assistance appeals committee, which will review the facts and make the final decision regarding the suspension. Students appealing financial assistance suspension may meet with the appeal committee. If a student appeal is approved, the student is placed on financial assistance probation for one payment period and is eligible for Title IV aid. If the student requires more than one payment period to reestablish eligibility with SAP standards, the student may be placed on an academic plan. The student will be on financial assistance probation during the first payment period of the academic plan. Students must meet SAP requirements at the end of the payment period or meet the requirements of the academic plan to continue to be eligible for financial assistance. Failure to meet SAP or academic plan requirements will result in the suspension of Title IV aid until the student regains eligibility by meeting SAP requirements. Students will be notified in writing of the requirements that must be met.

Reinstatement of Assistance

Students may regain eligibility by raising their cumulative GPA to the required level and/or by successfully completing the required number of hours in a succeeding semester(s).

Eligibility Requirements for Federal Programs

Students must meet compliance, as outlined below:

  • Be U. S. citizens or lawful permanent residents
  • Have established financial need
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress
  • Be enrolled, or accepted for enrollment
  • Not be in default on a Federal Perkins Loan (NDSL), Federal PLUS, or Federal Direct Loan
  • Not owe a refund on a Federal Pell Grant, TEG, or FSEOG

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students have the following rights.

  • To know what student financial assistance programs are available at LCU
  • To know the deadlines for submitting applications for each financial assistance program
  • To know how their financial need was determined, including how various expenses in their budget are evaluated
  • To know what resources are considered in the calculation of their awards
  • To request an explanation of the various programs in their financial assistance package
  • To consult with financial assistance personnel concerning their application for assistance
  • To consult with financial assistance personnel concerning any budgeting and/or financial issues
  • To cancel any loan proceeds received via electronic funds transfer up to fourteen days after the credit has been applied to the student billing account

Students have the following responsibilities

  • To check their LCU e-mail on a regular basis
  • To complete all application forms accurately and submit them on time to the appropriate office
  • To provide correct information and to be aware that, in most instances, misrepresenting information on a financial aid form is a violation of federal law and may be a criminal offense
  • To provide any additional documentation, verification of information, and information or corrections requested by financial assistance before any funds will be disbursed
  • To read, understand, and retain copies of all forms requiring a student’s signature
  • To keep a record of agreements requiring a student’s signature
  • To know all of the sources of financial aid received and whether the aid is a loan, grant, or scholarship, and if the aid is a loan, to know to whom repayment must be made and terms of repayment
  • To keep financial assistance informed of a correct address at all times while still in school and after graduation as long as loans are outstanding
  • To inform financial assistance of any change in status as a student or of financial status. This includes but is not limited to marriage, divorce, the birth of a child, employment, and the employment of a spouse or parents
  • To complete an exit interview prior to leaving the university, either as a result of graduation or withdrawal

Vocational Rehabilitation

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission offers assistance for tuition and fees for students with certain disabilities. Applications for TRC services are submitted to the Lubbock Regional Office of the Texas Rehabilitation Commission.

Contact Information

Lubbock Christian University
Financial Assistance Office
5601 19th Street
Lubbock, TX 79407
806.720.7176
FinancialAssist@LCU.edu

Graduate Financial Assistance

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To apply for financial assistance, each year students must complete and sign a State of Legal Residency Form, and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) before federal aid can be awarded. Additional documentation may be required if the U.S. Department of Education selects the file for verification or if special circumstances exist that merit verification. Students selected for verification will be notified by financial assistance office personnel.

Loans

Loans are based on the financial need of the student and must be repaid. Repayment begins either after graduation or when students stop attending school.

Financial Assistance Award Procedures

In order to be considered for financial assistance, students must first apply for financial assistance. Financial assistance will only be disbursed when the financial assistance file is complete, including each document requested by the financial assistance, admissions, and registrar offices. Student accounts are credited at the beginning of each enrollment period. State grant funds will not be credited until they are approved by the State of Texas, usually after September 1 for the fall semester, but later than the semester start date. Awards will be based on the number of hours for which a student is enrolled at the beginning of the enrollment period and the awards will be modified if the enrollment status changes.

Withdrawals

Students withdrawing from the university may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition paid for the registration period. If students receive financial assistance, then a portion of the aid may need to be returned to the loan source that issued the assistance. Information about the Return to Title IV fund requirements and the institutional refund policy are available in the office of the registrar. Students intending to withdraw must begin the withdrawal process in the office of the registrar.

Grade of F in All Courses During an Enrollment Period

When a student begins a semester by attending classes but does not earn a passing grade in at least one class or fails to officially withdraw, the institution must assume that the student has unofficially withdrawn unless it can document that the student completed the enrollment period. A student who unofficially withdraws and receives all F’s will be placed on Financial Assistance Suspension immediately.

Repeating Courses

Students repeating a course for the first time that was previously passed will be eligible for financial assistance. Students repeating a course that was previously failed may be eligible for financial assistance until the course is passed.

Enrolling in Courses not Required for the Degree

Students are responsible for enrolling in courses which apply to their degree plan. Enrolling in courses not required for a degree plan may affect the eligibility for aid. Students must notify financial assistance when enrolling in courses outside of their degree plan.

Maintaining Eligibility for Financial Assistance

To be eligible for financial assistance, students must maintain satisfactory progress. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.00 and students must successfully complete at least 75% of all credit hours attempted each term. Financial assistance recipients will be evaluated at the end of each enrollment period. When financial assistance recipients fail to meet the GPA requirement or complete the required percentage of attempted hours, recipients will be placed on financial assistance warning or suspension, as appropriate.

Financial Assistance Warning and Suspension

Students failing to meet the required GPA, will be notified that they are on financial assistance warning for the next succeeding payment period and in danger of losing their aid. If during a period of financial assistance warning, students fail to meet the required GPA, they will be placed on financial assistance suspension and will be ineligible for aid. Information regarding the appeal process is provided to the student in writing after student records are reviewed at the end of each payment period. Where extraordinary circumstances exist, students may present in writing their request to appeal the suspension. The appeal should be given, or mailed/emailed, to the Director of Financial Assistance. The appeal will be presented to the Financial Assistance Appeals Committee that will make the final decision regarding the suspension. Students may meet with the committee at the time and place scheduled by the director. If the student has an appeal approved, the student is placed on financial assistance probation for one payment period and is eligible for Title IV aid. If the student requires more than one payment period to reestablish eligibility with SAP standards, the student may be placed on academic plan. The student will be on financial assistance probation during the first payment period of the academic plan. Students must meet SAP requirements at the end of the payment period or meet the requirements of the academic plan to continue to be eligible for aid. Failure to meet SAP or the requirements of the academic plan will result in the suspension of Title IV aid until the student regains eligibility by meeting SAP requirements. Students will be notified in writing of the requirements that must be met.

Continued Eligibility Requirements for Federal Programs

Students must comply with the following.

  • Be U. S. citizens or lawful permanent residents
  • Have established financial need
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress
  • Be enrolled, or accepted for enrollment, as at least half-time student
  • Not be in default on a Federal Perkins Loan (NDSL), Federal PLUS, or Federal Direct Loan
  • Not owe a refund on a Federal Pell Grant, TEG, or FSEOG

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students have the following rights.

  • To know what student financial assistance programs are available at LCU
  • To know the deadlines for submitting applications for each financial assistance program
  • To know how their financial need was determined, including how various expenses in their budget are considered
  • To know what resources are considered in the calculation of their monetary awards
  • To request an explanation of the various programs in their financial assistance package
  • To consult with financial assistance personnel concerning their application for assistance
  • To consult with financial assistance personnel concerning any budgeting and/or financial issue
  • To cancel any loan proceeds received via electronic funds transfer (EFT) up to fourteen days after the credit has been applied to the student billing account

Students have the following responsibilities

  • To check their LCU e-mail on a regular basis
  • To complete all application forms accurately and submit them on time to the appropriate office
  • To provide correct information and to be aware that, in most instances, misrepresenting information on a financial aid form is a violation of federal law and may be a criminal offense that could result in indictment under the US Criminal Code
  • To provide any additional documentation, verification of information, and information or corrections requested by financial assistance before any funds will be disbursed
  • To read, understand, and retain copies of all forms requiring a student’s signature
  • To retain all agreements requiring a student’s signature
  • To know all of the sources of financial aid received and whether the aid is a loan, grant, or scholarship, and if the aid is a loan, to know to whom repayment must be made and terms of repayment
  • To keep financial assistance informed of a correct address at all times while still in school and after graduation as long as any loans are outstanding
  • To inform financial assistance of change in status as a student or of financial status. This includes but is not limited to marriage, divorce, the birth of a child, employment, and the employment of a spouse or parents
  • To complete an exit interview prior to leaving the university, either as a result of graduation or withdrawal

Contact Information

Lubbock Christian University
Financial Assistance Office
5601 19th Street
Lubbock, TX 79407
806.720.7176
FinancialAssist@LCU.edu

Veterans Benefit Information

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The university is approved for veterans programs except the Hazelwood Act. Depending on the program and eligibility, veterans may be paid a monthly allowance, tuition and fees, a housing stipend and/or book stipends from the Veterans Administration while attending college. Children of military members who died while on active duty may also be eligible for benefits. Applications for benefits should be completed and submitted on the VA website at www.gibill.va.gov. Veteran admission files must be complete and academic plans approved before the certification officer certifies enrollment for benefits. Complete veteran admission files must contain complete admissions documentation, an official military educational transcript, a copy of the DD Form 214, and a copy of the VA certificate of eligibility. Only classes meeting degree requirements are eligible for certification of benefits. Changes in major, class schedule and substitutions must be reported to the VA within a limited time frame, so each change must be discussed with the certification officer at the time of the change. Contact the certification official at Deanna.Brumfield@LCU.edu or 806.720.7252.

Academic Standards for Students Receiving VA Educational Benefits

Satisfactory Progress

  • Students must be in good academic standing to be considered making satisfactory progress.

Probation and Unsatisfactory Progress

  • Students who fail to maintain good academic standing are placed on probation for one semester. If students achieve a semester GPA of at least 2.00 during the probationary period, but have not achieved good academic standing, they may be continued on probation for one more semester. Students on probation and failing to achieve at least a 2.00 GPA at the end of the first probationary period and good academic standing by the end of the second probationary period are reported to the Veterans Affairs Regional Office as making unsatisfactory progress.

Department of Behavioral Sciences

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Faculty

  • Carlos Perez, Ph.D., Chair
  • Kaylene Brown, Ph.D.
  • Joshuah Ellis, Ph.D.
  • Macy Williamson, Ph.D.

Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies

The family studies degree explores relationships between family members across the lifespan.  The focus is on helping students recognize the impact of community, school, and church on relationships within the family.  Biological, cognitive, social, emotional, environmental, cultural and spiritual aspects of family development are studied in the context of understanding the impact change, crisis, and culture have over time. 

Family studies majors are involved in service learning activities throughout their college experience and the culminating service learning experience is a community practicum which provides learning in a variety of settings. Students intern in group homes, foster care centers, child care centers, schools, child care centers, child placing agencies, adoption agencies, youth development programs, nonprofit agencies, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, juvenile justice facilities and probation offices.

When students complete their family studies degree, they find employment in a wide variety of social service agencies, educational settings, and local, state, and federal governmental agencies.  Students who want to pursue graduate degrees are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research with faculty members.  

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • HSC2330  Love, Courtship, and Marriage
    • HSC3305  Children, Families, and Social Policy
    • HSC3313  The Family
    • HSC3322  Gender and Sexuality
    • HSC3326  Family Stress, Crisis, and Resilience
    • HSC3328  Parenting
    • HSC4323  Family Life Education and Enrichment
    • HSC4324  Family Dynamics of Addiction
    • HSC4326  Family and Community
    • PSY4391  Behavioral Sciences Capstone
    • 6 hours upper level from PSY or HSC
  3. Supporting Courses (18 hours)
    • PSY3315  Ethics in the Helping Professions
    • PSY2340  Psychological of Diversity
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with General Psychology Emphasis

The purpose of the study of psychology is to provide students an opportunity (1) to develop a better understanding of themselves and others, (2) to develop a broad base of knowledge about the field of psychology, and (3) to analyze critically psychological theories and principles from a Christian perspective. The psychology curriculum is designed to provide a core of knowledge about experimental, clinical, and counseling psychology. The program provides the flexibility that allows students to learn about psychology in multiple settings. The flexibility of the program allows students to emphasize the acquisition of useful life skills while preparing for graduate programs or vocational opportunities. Emphases in Art Therapy and Sport and Exercise Psychology are also available.

Students have the opportunity to be involved in service learning throughout their courses with the culminating service learning experience being a community practicum where the students apply the skills and knowledge they have learned in their courses.  Students wanting to pursue graduate degrees are encouraged to engage in research projects during the studies to help them prepare for applying to graduate programs.  Students from the program have pursued graduate degrees in experimental psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, and clinical mental health counseling.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • PSY3315  Ethics for the Helping Professional
    • PSY3327  Physiological Psychology
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • PSY4302  Theories of Personality
    • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
    • PSY4307  Learning, Cognition and Emotion
    • PSY4391  Behavioral Sciences Capstone
    • 9 hours upper level PSY or HSC
  3. Supporting Courses (18 hours)
    • HSC3313  The Family
    • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with Art Therapy Emphasis

The purpose of the study of psychology is to provide students an opportunity (1) to develop a better understanding of themselves and others, (2) to develop a broad base of knowledge about the field of psychology, and (3) to analyze critically psychological theories and principles from a Christian perspective. The psychology curriculum is designed to provide a core of knowledge about experimental, clinical, and counseling psychology. The program provides the flexibility that allows students to learn about psychology in multiple settings. The flexibility of the program allows students to emphasize the acquisition of useful life skills while preparing for graduate programs or vocational opportunities. Emphases in Art Therapy and Sport and Exercise Psychology are also available.

Students have the opportunity to be involved in service learning throughout their courses with the culminating service learning experience being a community practicum where the students apply the skills and knowledge they have learned in their courses.  Students wanting to pursue graduate degrees are encouraged to engage in research projects during the studies to help them prepare for applying to graduate programs.  Students from the program have pursued graduate degrees in experimental psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, and clinical mental health counseling.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3315  Ethics in Helping Professions
    • PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • PSY4302  Theories of Personality
    • PSY4307  Learning, Cognition and Emotion
    • PSY4390  Practicum
    • 3 hours upper level PSY
  3. Supporting Courses (18 hours)
    • ART1303  Drawing I
    • ART1304  Drawing II
    • ART2310  Ceramics
    • ART2312  Three-Dimensional Design
    • ART2316  Painting I
    • ART3306  Art and Children
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with Forensic Psychology Emphasis

The purpose of the study of psychology is to provide students an opportunity (1) to develop a better understanding of themselves and others, (2) to develop a broad base of knowledge about the field of psychology, and (3) to analyze critically psychological theories and principles from a Christian perspective. The psychology curriculum is designed to provide a core of knowledge about experimental, clinical, and counseling psychology. The program provides the flexibility that allows students to learn about psychology in multiple settings. The flexibility of the program allows students to emphasize the acquisition of useful life skills while preparing for graduate programs or vocational opportunities. Emphases in Art Therapy and Sport and Exercise Psychology are also available.

Students have the opportunity to be involved in service learning throughout their courses with the culminating service learning experience being a community practicum where the students apply the skills and knowledge they have learned in their courses.  Students wanting to pursue graduate degrees are encouraged to engage in research projects during the studies to help them prepare for applying to graduate programs.  Students from the program have pursued graduate degrees in experimental psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, and clinical mental health counseling.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • CRJ3301  Criminology
    • CRJ4333  Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
    • HSC3326  Family, Stress, Crisis, and Resilience
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • PSY3327  Physiological Psychology
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • PSY4302  Theories of Personality
    • PSY4307  Learning, Cognition and Emotion
    • PSY4321  Forensic Psychology
    • PSY4391  Behavioral Sciences Capstone
    • 6 hours upper level PSY or HSC
  3. Supporting Courses (18 hours)
    • CRJ2301  Introduction to Criminal Justice
    • CRJ2305  Court and Criminal Procedure
    • CRJ3312  Violent Offenders
    • CRJ3322  Social Deviance
    • PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • PSY4322  Drugs, Alcohol, and Behavior
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with Sport and Exercise Psychology Emphasis

The purpose of the study of psychology is to provide students an opportunity (1) to develop a better understanding of themselves and others, (2) to develop a broad base of knowledge about the field of psychology, and (3) to analyze critically psychological theories and principles from a Christian perspective. The psychology curriculum is designed to provide a core of knowledge about experimental, clinical, and counseling psychology. The program provides the flexibility that allows students to learn about psychology in multiple settings. The flexibility of the program allows students to emphasize the acquisition of useful life skills while preparing for graduate programs or vocational opportunities. Emphases in Art Therapy and Sport and Exercise Psychology are also available.

Students have the opportunity to be involved in service learning throughout their courses with the culminating service learning experience being a community practicum where the students apply the skills and knowledge they have learned in their courses.  Students wanting to pursue graduate degrees are encouraged to engage in research projects during the studies to help them prepare for applying to graduate programs.  Students from the program have pursued graduate degrees in experimental psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, and clinical mental health counseling.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • PSY3327  Physiological Psychology
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • PSY4302  Theories of Personality
    • PSY4304  Psychological Testing
    • PSY4307  Learning, Cognition and Emotion
    • PSY4390  Practicum
    • ESS3324  Sport in Society
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • 3 hours upper level PSY
  3. Supporting Courses (24 hours)
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 6 hours from
      • ESS3321  Management of Sport
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
      • ESS4382  Lifespan Motor Development
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Minor in Family Studies

(18 hours)

  • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
  • HSC2330  Love, Courtship, and Marriage
  • HSC3324  Marriage and Family Therapy
  • HSC3326  Family Stress, Crisis, and Resilience
  • HSC3328  Parenting
  • HSC4323  Family Life Education and Enrichment

Minor in Psychology

(18 hours)

  • PSY1300  General Psychology
  • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
  • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
  • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
  • PSY3381  Social Psychology
  • PSY4302  Theories of Personality

Minor in Theology & Psychology

Minor in Theology & Psychology is listed for Department of Biblical Studies and Behavioral Sciences

(18 hours)

  • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
  • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
  • PSY3381  Social Psychology
  • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
  • 6 hours from
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH3331  Christian History and Theology III
    • MIN4331  Spiritual Direction and Worship
    • upper level REL
    • PHI (excluding PHI3305 Ethics)

Department of Biblical Studies

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Faculty

  • Brandon L. Fredenburg, Ph.D., Chair of Academic Affairs
  • Jim Beck, M.S.
  • Jeff Cary, Ph.D., Dean of the Alfred and Patricia Smith College of Biblical Studies
  • David Fraze, D.Min.
  • Jeremy Hegi, Ph.D.
  • Jesse C. Long, Jr., Ph.D.
  • Michael Martin, Ph.D.
  • Shannon Rains, D.Min.
  • Mark Sneed, Ph.D.
  • Barry Stephens, D.Min.
  • Shawn Tyler, M.S.
  • Mark Wiebe, Ph.D.

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Text

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1312  Introduction to the Old Testament for Majors
    • BIB1322  Introduction to the New Testament for Majors
    • MIN2322  Christian Spiritual Formation
    • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300
      • SOC1300
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • PHI3305 Ethics
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BIB4060  Senior Presentation
    • BIB4090  Practicum
    • 9 hours from BIB, BNT, or BOT
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL4351  Advanced Greek
      • BIL4357  Advanced Hebrew
    • 12 upper level hours from BIB, BNT, or BOT
    • MIN4342  Christian Ministry
    • YFM2311  Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry
  3. Supporting Courses (42 hours)
    • BIB2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
      • BIL3313  Elementary Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
      • BIL3324  Elementary Hebrew II
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3331  Intermediate Greek I
      • BIL4336  Intermediate Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3342  Intermediate Greek II
      • BIL4345  Intermediate Hebrew II
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH4331  Christian History and Theology III
    • HTH4342  History of American Christianity
    • MIN2303  The Ministry of Teaching
    • MIN2311  Mission of God
    • MIN3301  Family and Congregational Dynamics
    • MIN3304  The Ministry of Preaching
    • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
    • 3 hours from upper division REL or PHI
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Children's Ministry

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1312  Introduction to the Old Testament for Majors
    • BIB1322  Introduction to the New Testament for Majors
    • MIN2322  Christian Spiritual Formation
    • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300
      • SOC1300
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • PHI3305 Ethics
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BIB4060  Senior Presentation
    • 12 hours from BIB, BNT, or BOT
    • CFM2326  Practice of Children and Family Ministry
    • CFM3301  Children's Spiritual Formation
    • CFM3302  Methods for Children's Spiritual Formation
    • CFM4090  Practicum
    • MIN3303  Contemporary Issues in the Family
    • MIN4342  Christian Ministry
    • YFM2311  Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry
  3. Supporting Courses (42 hours)
    • BIB2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
      • BIL3313  Elementary Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
      • BIL3324  Elementary Hebrew II
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3331  Intermediate Greek I
      • BIL4336 Intermediate Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3342  Intermediate Greek II
      • BIL4345  Intermediate Hebrew II
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH4331  Christian History and Theology III
    • HTH4342  History of American Christianity
    • MIN2303  The Ministry of Teaching
    • MIN2311  Mission of God
    • MIN3301  Family and Congregational Dynamics
    • MIN3304  The Ministry of Preaching
    • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
    • 3 hours from upper division REL or PHI
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Missions

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1312  Introduction to the Old Testament for Majors
    • BIB1322  Introduction to the New Testament for Majors
    • MIN2322  Christian Spiritual Formation
    • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300
      • SOC1300
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • PHI3305 Ethics
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BIB4060  Senior Presentation
    • 12 hours from BIB, BNT, or BOT
    • MIN4342  Christian Ministry
    • MIS3305  Creative Mission Strategies
    • MIS3312  Intercultural Engagement
    • MIS3313  Christian Missional Engagement
    • MIS4322  Missional Logistics
    • MIS4310  Team Dynamics
    • MIS4090  Practicum
  3. Supporting Courses (42 hours)
    • BIB2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
      • BIL3313  Elementary Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
      • BIL3324  Elementary Hebrew II
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3331  Intermediate Greek I
      • BIL4336  Intermediate Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3342  Intermediate Greek II
      • BIL4345  Intermediate Hebrew II
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH4331  Christian History and Theology III
    • HTH4342  History of American Christianity
    • MIN2303  The Ministry of Teaching
    • MIN2311  Mission of God
    • MIN3301  Family and Congregational Dynamics
    • MIN3304  The Ministry of Preaching
    • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
    • 3 hours from REL or PHI
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Youth and Family Ministry

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1312  Introduction to the Old Testament for Majors
    • BIB1322  Introduction to the New Testament for Majors
    • MIN2322  Christian Spiritual Formation
    • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300
      • SOC1300
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • PHI3305 Ethics
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BIB4060  Senior Presentation
    • 12 hours from BIB, BNT, or BOT
    • MIN3303  Contemporary Issues in the Family
    • MIN4342  Christian Ministry
    • YFM2311  Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry
    • YFM2324  Strategic Issues of Youth and Family Ministry
    • YFM3303  Adolescent Spiritual Formation
    • YFM4322  Advanced Youth and Family Ministry
    • YFM4090  Practicum
  3. Supporting Courses (42 hours)
    • BIB2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
      • BIL3313  Elementary Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
      • BIL3324  Elementary Hebrew II
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3331  Intermediate Greek I
      • BIL4336  Intermediate Hebrew I
    • 3 hours from
      • BIL3342  Intermediate Greek II
      • BIL4345  Intermediate Hebrew II
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH4331  Christian History and Theology III
    • HTH4342  History of American Christianity
    • MIN2303 The Ministry of Teaching
    • MIN2311  Mission of God
    • MIN3301  Family and Congregational Dynamics
    • MIN3304  The Ministry of Preaching
    • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
    • 3 hours from REL or PHI
  4. Elective (6 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Minor in Bible Studies

The minor in Bible Studies requires 18 hours.

  • 6 required hours from
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
  • 12 hours from:
    • 3 hours from
      • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament, or
      • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • 3 hours from
      • MIN2303  Ministry of Teaching, or
      • MIN3304  Ministry of Preaching
    • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
    • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
    • Up to 12 upper level hours from BIB, BIL, BNT, or BOT

Minor in Children and Family Ministry

The minor in Children and Family Ministry requires 18 hours.

  • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
  • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
  • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
  • CFM2326  Practice of Children and Family Ministry
  • CFM3302  Methods of Children’s Spiritual Formation
  • 3 hours from
    • CFM3301  Children’s Spiritual Formation
    • YFM3303  Adolescent Spiritual Formation

Minor in Christian History and Theology

The minor in Christian History and Theology requires 18 hours.

  • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
  • BIB3310  Christian Life
  • 12 hours from
    • 3 hours from
      • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
      • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • Up to 12 upper level hours from HTH, PHI, or REL

Minor in Missional Engagement

The minor in Missional Engagement requires 18 hours. The student must be in good standing with the university and maintain ongoing involvement in the missions community.

  • MIS3312  Intercultural Engagement
  • MIS3313  Christian Missional Engagement
  • 12 hours from
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • MIN2311  Mission of God
    • Upper level MIS
    • REL3301  World Religions
    • REL3313  World Christianity

Minor in Philosophy

The minor in Philosophy requires 18 hours.

  • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHI3303  Plato
  • PHI3305  Ethics
  • 9 hours from
    • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • PHI3304  Augustine and Aquinas
    • PHI4306  Philosophy of Religion
    • REL3368  Intermediate Studies in Religion/Theology

Minor in Youth and Family Ministry

The minor in Youth Ministry requires 18 hours.

  • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
  • BIB3310  Christian Life
  • YFM2311  Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry
  • YFM2324  Strategic Issues of Youth and Family Ministry
  • 6 hours from
    • 3 hours from
      • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
      • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • MIN3303  Contemporary Issues in the Family
    • 3 hours from:
      • YFM3303  Adolescent Spiritual Formation
      • CFM3301  Children’s Spiritual Formation 
    • YFM4322  Advanced Youth and Family Ministry

Minor in Theology & Psychology

The Minor in Theology & Psychology requires 18 hours and is listed for both Department of Biblical Studies and Behavioral Sciences.

  • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
  • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
  • PSY3381  Social Psychology
  • HTH3311  Christian History and Theology I
  • 6 hours from
    • HTH3322  Christian History and Theology II
    • HTH3331  Christian History and Theology III
    • MIN4331  Spiritual Direction and Worship
    • upper level REL
    • PHI (excluding PHI3305 Ethics)

School of Business

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Mission

To prepare students for their callings as Christ-centered Business professionals, fully equipped for lives of Christian service and leadership.

Faculty

  • Tracy Mack, M.B.A, Dean of the School of Business
  • Matthew Bumstead, M.B.A.
  • Haley Burton, M.S.
  • Russell Dabbs, Ph.D.
  • Doug Darby, Ph.D.
  • Caren Fullerton, Ph.D.
  • Laci Richardson, Ph.D.
  • Nathan Richardson, M.S.
  • Joshua Sauerwein, D.B.A.

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • ACC3301  Intermediate Accounting I
    • ACC3302  Intermediate Accounting II
    • ACC3303  Cost Accounting
    • ACC3305  Special Problems in Accounting
    • 12 hours from upper level ACC
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3310  Money and Banking
    • BUA3330  Data Visualization
    • ACC3320  Business Ethics for Accountants
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • 3 hours upper level from ACC, BUA, DMA, ECO, FIN, IST, MGT, or PFP
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Economics

The Bachelor of Science in Economics are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BUA3310  Money and Banking
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • ECO3301  Intermediate Macroeconomics
    • ECO3302  Intermediate Microeconomics
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • 3 hours from
      • FIN4302  Corporate Finance II
      • FIN4309  Investments
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • 6 hours from upper level ECO
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • MAT1316  Business Calculus
    • 3 hours from ACC, BUA, DMA, ECO, FIN, IST, or MGT
    • 6 hours from FOL, GEG, GOV, HIS, MAT (1312 or higher), PHI, PSY, or SOC
    • Minor (18 hours)
      • Minors in Natural or Physical Science earn a Bachelor of Science degree
      • Up to 9 hours required for the minor may be included in the major
      • In cases where major hours count for minor courses electives will be increased
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from  BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from  AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • BUA3310  Money and Banking
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • ECO3301  Intermediate Macroeconomics
    • ECO3302  Intermediate Microeconomics
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • 3 hours from
      • FIN4302  Corporate Finance II
      • FIN4309  Investments
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • 6 hours from upper level ECO
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • BUA4330  Internship
    • BUA4380  Business Policy
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • MAT1316  Business Calculus
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • 6 hours from ACC, AEC, BUA, DMA, ECO, FIN, IST, MAT (1312 or higher), MGT, or PFP
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ACC3301  Intermediate Accounting I
    • ACC3302  Intermediate Accounting II
    • ACC3303  Cost Accounting
    • BUA3310  Money and Banking
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • FIN4302  Corporate Finance II
    • FIN4309  Investments
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • FIN4315  Financial Statement Analysis
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • BUA4330  Internship
    • BUA4380  Business Policy
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • MAT1316  Business Calculus
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • 3 hours upper level from ACC, BUA, COM, DMA, ECO, FIN, IST, MGT, or PFP
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Administration with AgriBusiness Emphasis

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Business with AgriBusiness, General Business, and Marketing emphases are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • BUA4330  Internship
    • BUA4380  Business Policy
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  3. Emphasis (24 hours)
    * According to ACBSP standards, before a new program can be considered for accreditation,  it must be operational with enrolled students for at least two years and have graduates. The Bachelor of Business Administration in Business with AgriBusiness emphasis commenced Fall 2019.
    • AGR1304  Principles of Soil Science
    • ANS1303  Principles of Animal Science
    • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • AEC3304  Farm and Ranch Management
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • FIN4315  Financial Statement Analysis
    • 3 hours from:
      • AEC3315 Agricultural Policy
      • NRC3322 Natural Resources Policy, Regulation, and Compliance
    • 3 hours upper level ANS
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Management is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from  BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from  AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • MGT4320  Leadership
    • MGT4306  Human Resource Management
    • MGT3310  Organizational Behavior
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • BUA4330  Internship
    • BUA4380  Business Policy
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • FIN4315  Financial Statement Analysis
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • 6 hours from upper level MGT
  3. Supporting Courses (30 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • ECO2302  Microeconomics
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • 3 hours from
      • COM3371  Group Communication 
      • COM4341  Communication and Conflict
      • COM4372  Organizational Communication
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management Information Systems

The Bachelor of Business Administration in Management Information Systems is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • IST3310  Online and Social Media Applications
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • IST3341  Database Management Systems
    • IST4322  Governance of Enterprise Technology
    • IST4330  Internship
    • IST4340  Network Security
    • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
    • WEB2320 Web Design
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analysis
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
    • MAT1316  Business Calculus
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • MGT3320  Project Management
    • 9 hours from ACC, BUA, CRJ, DMA, ECO, IST, or WEB
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and Technology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACSBP).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • IST2335  Advanced Programming Concepts
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • IST3341  Database Management Systems
    • IST4322  Governance of Enterprise Technology
    • IST4330  Internship
    • IST4340  Network Security
    • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
    • WEB2310  Web Programming
    • WEB2320  Web Design
  3. Supporting Courses (24 hours)
    • ACC2301  Financial Accounting
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • MGT3320  Project Management
    • 12 hours from ACC, CRJ, DMA, IST, MAT, or WEB
  4. Electives (18 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Digital Media Applications

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2343  Motion Graphics
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • DMA3311  Digital Video
    • DMA3331  Game Design
    • DMA3333  Digital Imaging
    • DMA3341  Advertising Design
    • DMA4324  Three-Dimensional Modeling
    • DMA4320  UI/UX Design
    • DMA4330  Digital Media Internship/Portfolio
    • DMA4340  Advanced Digital Imaging
    • DMA4380  Advanced Digital Production
    • WEB2320  Web Design
  3. Supporting Courses (27 hours)
    • ART1303  Drawing I
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3320 Business Ethics
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • IST3310  Online and Social Media Applications
    • MGT3320  Project Management
    • 9 upper level hours from ART, BUA, COM, DMA, or IST
  4. Electives (9 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Web Design

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, ENG, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • IST2314  Graphical User Interface Programming
    • IST2335  Advanced Programming Concepts
    • IST3341  Database Management Systems
    • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • DMA4320  UI/UX Design
    • WEB2310  Web Programming
    • WEB2320  Web Design
    • WEB3310  Advanced Web Programming
    • WEB4330  Web Internship / Portfolio
    • WEB4380  Web Development
  3. Supporting Courses (24 hours)
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • MGT3320  Project Management
    • 6 hours from IST, DMA, ART, COM, or MGT
    • 3 upper level hours from IST, DMA, ART, COM, or MGT
  4. Electives (9 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Managerial Leadership

The Bachelor of Science in Managerial Leadership is designed for non-traditional students who have earned some college credit but no degree.  This program is reserved for students who have earned at least 45 college credit hours and are at least 25 years of age.  The program is offered in an asynchronous online format to allow students flexibility to complete the degree.

  1. University Core (39 hours)
    • 6 hours from
      • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
      • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
      • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
      • BIB3310  Christian Life
      • 3 hours BIB
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2170  College Success
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • 3 hours from ACC
    • BUA1302  Fundamentals of Business
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA4301  Business Law
    • FIN2301  Personal Financcial Planning
    • IST1301  Foundation of Informational Systems and Technology
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • MGT3310  Organizational Behavior
    • MGT4306  Human Resource Management
    • MGT4320  Leadership
    • MGL4300  Managerial Faith and Business Leadership Capstone
    • 3 hours upper level PHI (or Ethics course)
  3. Electives (45 hours - at least 15 hours must be upper level)
  4. Total (120 hours)

Minor in Agriculture Business

Minor available in Agriculture Business. See advisor for details.

Minor in Applied Computing

(18 hours*)

  • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
  • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
  • IST3341  Database Management Systems
  • 9 hours from (6 hours must be upper level):
    • IST2335  Advanced Programming Concepts
    • IST2314  Graphical User Interface Programming
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • IST3330  Introduction to Computer Operating Systems
    • WEB2310  Web Programming
    • WEB3310  Advanced Web Programming

*Minor requires 18 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses. Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Business Administration

(18 hours)

  • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
  • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
  • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
  • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
  • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  • 3 hours from ACC, BUA, ECO, FIN, IST, MGT, or PFP

Minor in Computer Programming Languages

(18 hours)

  • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
  • IST2335  Advanced Programming Concepts
  • IST2314  Graphical User Interface Programming
  • WEB2320  Web Design
  • 6 upper level hours from
    • IST3330  Introduction to Computer Operating Systems
    • IST3341  Database Management Systems
    • WEB2320  Web Programming
    • WEB3310  Advanced Web Programming

Minor in Cybersecurity

(18 hours*)

  • MGT3320  Project Management
  • IST4333  Server Administration
  • IST4340  Network Security
  • IST4345  Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity
  • CRJ4325  Forensic Computer Examination
  • CRJ4327  Cyber Crimes

*Minor requires 18 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses. Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Data Analytics

(18 hours*)

  • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
  • BUA2310  Business Statistics
  • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
  • BUS3330  Data Visualization
  • 6 hours from
    • IST3341  Database Management Systems
    • IST3311  Management Information Systems
    • MAT1316  Business Calculus
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics

*Minor requires 18 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses.  Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Digital Media Applications

(18 hours)

  • DMA3333  Digital Imaging
  • DMA3341  Advertising Design
  • DMA3342  Document Design
  • WEB2320  Web Design
  • 3 hours from upper level DMA
  • 3 hours from
    • DMA2343  Motion Graphics
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design

Minor in Economics

(18 hours)

  • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
  • ECO2302  Microeconomics
  • ECO3301  Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO3302  Intermediate Microeconomics
  • 6 hours from following
    • BUA3310  Money and Banking
    • FIN4311  International Trade and Finance
    • Upper level ECO 

Minor in Finance

(18 hours*)

  • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
  • FIN3300  Corporate Finance I
  • BUA3310  Money and Banking
  • FIN4309  Investments
  • 6 hours from upper level FIN 

*Minor requires 18 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses.  Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Game Design

(18 hours*)

  • DMA3331  Game Design I
  • DMA4320  UI/UX Design
  • DMA4324  Three-Dimensional Modeling
  • IST2335  Advance Programming Concepts
  • WEB3310  Advanced Web Programming
  • 3 hours from DMA or IST

*Minor requires 18 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses. Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Information Technology Management

(19 hours*)

  • IST3311  Management Information Systems
  • MGT3320  Project Management
  • IST3333  User Support and Help Desk Concepts
  • IST4333  Server Administration
  • IST4345  Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity
  • IST1101  ChapDesk Customer Service
  • IST2101  ChapDesk Troubleshooting
  • IST3201  ChapDesk Leadership

*Minor requires 19 credit hours, excluding prerequisite requirements for these courses. Students needing prerequisite courses in order to register for required courses may anticipate an additional 6-9 credit hours to complete the Minor.

Minor in Management Information Systems

(18 hours)

  • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
  • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
  • IST3311  Management Information Systems
  • IST4322  Governance of Enterprise Technology
  • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
  • WEB2320  Web Design

Minor in Information Systems and Technology

(18 hours)

  • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
  • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
  • IST3341  Database Management Systems
  • IST4340  Network Security
  • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
  • WEB2320  Web Design 

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Faculty

  • Julie Marshall, Ph.D., Chair
  • Byron Rogers, Ph.D.
  • Jessica Rogers, M.S.
  • Scott Young, M.S.

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG4318  Research Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (35 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods
    • CHE3310  Labratory Management
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
    • CHE4102  Senior Seminar
  3. Supporting Courses (31 hours)
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • 12 hours from BIO, at least 6 hours from upper level
  4. Electives (8 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry with Pre-Dental emphasis

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG4318  Research Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (35 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods
    • CHE3310  Labratory Management
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
    • CHE4102  Senior Seminar
  3. Pre-Dental Emphasis (34-36 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 12-14 hours from
      • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
      • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
      • BIO3300  Genetics
      • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
      • BIO3310  General Microbiology
      • BIO3111  Microbiology lab
      • BIO3314  Physiology of Reproduction
  4. Electives (3-5 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry with Pre-Medical emphasis

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG4318  Research Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (35 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods
    • CHE3310  Labratory Management
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
    • CHE4102  Senior Seminar
  3. Pre-Dental Emphasis (36 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
    • BIO3310  General Microbiology
    • BIO3111  Microbiology lab
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 4 hours from Human Anatomy and Physiology
  4. Electives (3 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry with Pre-Pharmacy emphasis

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • ENG2307  Literature and Life (H)
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (35 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods
    • CHE3310  Labratory Management
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
    • CHE4102  Senior Seminar
  3. Supporting Courses (34-36 hours)
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 12-14 hours from
      • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
      • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
      • BIO3300  Genetics
      • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
      • BIO3310  General Microbiology
      • BIO3111  Microbiology lab
      • BIO3314  Physiology of Reproduction
  4. Electives (3-5 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (31 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3211  Intergrated Physical and Analytical Chemistry Lab
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation
    • CHE3310 Laboratory Management
    • CHE4102  Chemical Literature and Seminar
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
  3. Supporting Courses (21 hours)
    • 1 hour from ESS Activity Course
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheets
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • 3 hours from MAT
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
  4. Electives (23 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (37 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3211  Intergrated Physical and Analytical Chemistry Lab
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation
    • CHE3310  Laboratory Management
    • CHE4102  Chemical Literature and Seminar
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • CHE4424  Physical Chemistry II
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
  3. Supporting Courses (29 hours)
    • 1 hour from ESS Activity Course
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheets
    • 3 hours from IST or MAT
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • MAT1403  Analytical Geometry and Calculus II
    • MAT2404  Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
    • MAT3306  Differential Equations
    • PHY2301  Engineering Physics I
    • PHY2101  Engineering Physics I Lab
    • PHY2302  Engineering Physics II
    • PHY2102  Engineering Physics II Lab
  4. Electives (8 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with Educator Certification

Students planning to certify to teach are required to take the following courses in addition to the Bachelor of Science requirements outlined above. Refer to the educator certification section of this catalog for other requirements.

Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility (6 hours)

  • 3 hours from
    • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
  • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child

Methods Block (9 hours)

  • 3 hours from
    • EDS4340  Reading/Writing/Thinking in Secondary and Middle School
    • REA3340  Reading Writing Connection
    • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
  • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
  • EDS4350  Design and Delivery

Clinical Teaching Block (12 hours)

  • EDS4120 Clinical Teaching Orientation
  • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
  • EDS4262  Seminar in Education
  • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching

Minor in Chemistry

Minor in Chemistry (18 hours)

  • CHE1307  General Chemisry I
  • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
  • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
  • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
  • 3 hours from the following
    • CHE3305  Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation
    • CHE3310  Laboratory Management
    • CHE4323  Physical Chemistry I
    • UGR4388  Undergraduate Research
  • 7 upper level hours from two areas of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, organic, or physical) with 2-3 hours from labs

Department of Communication and Fine Arts

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Faculty

  • Laurie Doyle, Ph.D., Chair
  • Philip Camp, Ph.D.
  • Melanie Grelhesl, M.A.
  • Ronelle Howell, M.F.A, M.Ed.
  • Abraham Mata, Ph.D.
  • Lisa Tatum, Ph.D.

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art with Art Education emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from HIS, GOV, ECO, or FIN
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from FOL
    • ART2307  Survey of Art History I
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • ART1303  Drawing I
    • ART1304  Drawing II
    • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
    • ART2000  Review in Art
    • ART2308  Survey of Art History II
    • ART2310  Ceramics
    • ART2312  Three-Dimensional Design
    • ART2316  Painting I
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • ART3326  Sculpture
    • 6 hours from
      • ART3352  Special Topics in Art History
      • ART4302  History of Art in the U.S.
      • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
      • ART4352  Special Topics in Art History
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • 3 hours from upper level ART
  3. Emphasis (21 hours)
    • ART3310  Printmaking
    • ART2306  Life Drawing
    • ART3303  Curriculum and Assessment in K-12 Art
    • 3 hours from
      • ART3304  Painting II
      • ART3309  Painting III
    • ART4305  Contemporary Issues in Art Education
    • ART4360  Senior Seminar
    • 3 hours from ART or DMA
  4. Pedagogy and Professional Practice (24 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
      • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • 3 hours from
      • EDS4340  Reading, Writing and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
      • REA3340  The Reading Writing Connection
      • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
    • Methods Block
      • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
      • EDS4350  Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4262  Seminar in Education
      • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching
  5. Electives (3-4 hours)
  6. Total (135-136)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art with Drawing and Painting emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from HIS, GOV, ECO, or FIN
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from FOL
    • ART2307  Survey of Art History I
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • ART1303  Drawing I
    • ART1304  Drawing II
    • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
    • ART2000  Review in Art
    • ART2308  Survey of Art History II
    • ART2310  Ceramics
    • ART2312  Three-Dimensional Design
    • ART2316  Painting I
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • ART3326  Sculpture
    • 6 hours from
      • ART3352  Special Topics in Art History
      • ART4302  History of Art in the U.S.
      • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
      • ART4352  Special Topics in Art History
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Imaging
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • 3 upper level hours from ART
  3. Emphasis (27 hours)
    • ART2306  Life Drawing
    • ART3304  Painting II
    • ART3309  Painting III
    • ART3310  Printmaking
    • ART4303  Professional Practice and Special Problems in Drawing
    • ART4304  Professional Practice and Special Problems in Painting
    • ART4360  Senior Seminar
    • 6 hours from ART or DMA
  4. Supporting (12 hours)
    • 12 upper level hours from at least two of COM, FOL, HIS, HUM, ENG, GOV, MUS, PHI, PSY, SOC, REL or THA
  5. Electives (3-4 hours)
  6. Total (129-130)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art with a Graphic Design emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from HIS, GOV, ECO, or FIN
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from FOL
    • ART2307  Survey of Art History I
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • ART1303  Drawing I
    • ART1304  Drawing II
    • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
    • ART2000  Review in Art
    • ART2308  Survey of Art History II
    • ART2310  Ceramics
    • ART2312  Three-Dimensional Design
    • ART2316  Painting I
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • ART3326  Sculpture
    • 6 hours from
      • ART3352  Special Topics in Art History
      • ART4302  History of Art in the U.S.
      • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
      • ART4352  Special Topics in Art History
    • DMA1300 Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • 3 hours from upper level ART
  3. Emphasis (30 hours)
    • ART3310  Printmaking
    • ART2311  Typography
    • ART4313  Graphic Design Systems
    • ART4311  Illustration: Traditional and Digital
    • ART4360  Senior Seminar
    • COM4330  Senior Internship
    • DMA3341  Advertising Design
    • DMA3342  Document Design
    • 6 hours from upper level DMA
  4. Supporting Courses (12 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • DMA3311  Digital Video
      • DMA4324  Three-Dimensional Modeling
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Communications
    • COM2348  Communication Theory
    • COM3354  Advertising
  5. Electives (3-4 hours)
  6. Total (132-133 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hour from ECO, FIN, GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hour from AFA, BIL, Fine Arts History, GBC, PHI, or REL
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
    • COM2348  Communication Theory
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
    • COM2360  Social Media Communication
    • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
    • COM3371  Group Communication
    • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • COM4372  Organizational Communication
    • 6 hours from
      • COM3343  News Reporting
      • COM3354  Advertising
      • COM3360  E-marketing and Social Media
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
    • 6 hours from
      • COM4321  Advanced Public Speaking and Rhetorical Analysis
      • COM4341  Communication and Conflict
      • COM4374  Persuasive Communication
  3. Supporting Courses (23-25 hours)
    • DMA1300  Itroduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • 3 hours from
      • BUA2310  Business Statistics
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3306  Consumer Behavior
    • COM1105  News Lab
    • COM2105  News Lab
    • 6-8 hours from one FOL
  4. Electives (11-13 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Marketing Communication

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hour from ECO, FIN, GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hour from AFA, BIL, Fine Arts History, GBC, PHI, or REL 
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (38 hours)
    • COM1100  Electronic Activity Lab
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
    • COM2100  Electronic Activity Lab
    • COM2303  Principles of Announcing
    • COM2320  Videography and Photography
    • COM2348  Communication Theory
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
    • COM2360  Social Media Communication
    • COM3354  Advertising
    • COM3360  E-Marketing and Social Media
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • COM4374  Persuasive Communication
    • 6 hours from
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3371  Group Communication
      • COM4372  Organizational Communication
  3. Supporting Courses (27-29 hours)
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • BUA3306  Consumer Behavior
    • ECO2301
    • 6-8 hours from one FOL
    • 6 hours from
      • ART4313  Graphic Design Systems
      • ENG3305  Introduction to Creative Writing
      • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3326  Film Studies
      • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
      • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
  4. Electives (8-10 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Mass Media

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hour from ECO, FIN, GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hour from AFA, BIL, Fine Arts History, GBC, PHI, or REL 
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (41 hours)
    • COM1100  Electronic Activity Lab
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
    • COM2100  Electronic Activity Lab
    • COM2303  Principles of Announcing
    • COM2320  Videography and Photography
    • COM2348  Communication Theory
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
    • COM2360  Social Media Communication
    • COM3301  Sports Writing and Reporting
    • COM3331  Television Production
    • COM3343  News Reporting
    • COM3354  Advertising
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • 6 hours from
      • COM3360  E-marketing and Social Media
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • COM4374  Persuasive Communication
  3. Supporting Courses (23-25 hours)
    • COM1105  News Lab
    • COM2105  News Lab
    • 6 hours from
      • COM4321  Advanced Public Speaking and Rhetorical Analysis
      • ENG3305  Introduction to Creative Writing
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • DMA3344  Multimedia Design
    • 6-8 hours from one FOL
    • THA3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting
  4. Electives (9-11 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Music

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MUS3303  Music History I
    • MUS3304  Music History II
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • MUS1000  Piano Proficiency Test
    • MUS1301  Music Literature
    • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
    • MUS1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
    • MUS1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS2000  Music Seminar
    • MUS2305  Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS2306  Form, Analysis and Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2106  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS3230  Orchestration
    • MUS4000  Senior Recital
    • MUS4204  General Conducting
    • 1 hour from
      • MUS4106  Advanced Choral Conducting
      • MUS4105  Advanced Instrumental Conducting
    • MUS4320  Elementary Music Methods
    • MUS4360  Senior Seminar
    • 3 hours from
      • MUS4311  Secondary Choral Methods
      • MUS4312  Secondary Instrumental Methods
    • 3 hours from
      • MUS3305  Vocal Pedagogy
      • MUS3307  Piano Pedagogy
      • MUS3308  Marching Band Techniques
  3. Supporting Courses (30 hours)
    • 12 hours from major instrument or voice
    • 4 hours from minor instrument or voice
    • 3 hours from music performance group
    • 6 hours upper level from THA or ART
    • Voice Majors
      • MUS1203  Language Diction I
      • MUS1204  Language Diction II
      • MUS2139  Instrumental Methods for Vocal Majors
    • Instrumental Majors
      • 5 hours from
        • MUS2129  Clarinet and Saxophone
        • MUS2130  High Brass
        • MUS2131  Low Brass
        • MUS2132  Percussion
        • MUS2133  String Methods
        • MUS2134  Flute and Double Reed
  4. Electives (9 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Music in Music Education

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MUS3303  Music History I
    • MUS3304  Music History II
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • MUS1000  Piano Proficiency Test
    • MUS1301  Music Literature
    • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
    • MUS1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
    • MUS1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS2000  Music Seminar
    • MUS2305  Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS2306  Form, Analysis and Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2106  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS3230  Orchestration
    • MUS4000  Senior Recital
    • MUS4204  General Conducting
    • 1 hour from
      • MUS4106  Advanced Choral Conducting
      • MUS4105  Advanced Instrumental Conducting
    • MUS4320  Elementary Music Methods
    • MUS4360  Senior Seminar
    • 3 hours from
      • MUS4311  Secondary Choral Methods
      • MUS4312  Secondary Instrumental Methods
    • 3 hours from
      • MUS3305  Vocal Pedagogy
      • MUS3307  Piano Pedagogy
      • MUS3308  Marching Band Techniques
  3. Supporting Courses (24 hours)
    • 12 hours from major instrument or voice
    • 4 hours from minor instrument or voice
    • 3 hours from music performance group
    • Voice Majors
      • MUS1203  Language Diction I
      • MUS1204  Language Diction II
      • MUS2139  Instrumental Methods for Vocal Majors
    • Instrumental Majors
      • 5 hours from
        • MUS2129  Clarinet and Saxophone
        • MUS2130  High Brass
        • MUS2131  Low Brass
        • MUS2132  Percussion
        • MUS2133  String Methods
        • MUS2134  Flute and Double Reed
  4. Pedagogy and Professional Practice (27 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • EDS 2310 Foundations in Education
      • EDS 2320 Instructional Technology
      • EEL 2310 Teachers, Schools, and Society
    • 3 hours from
      • EDS 4340 Reading, Writing, and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
      • REA 3340 The Reading Writing Connection
      • REA 4350 Practical Applications to Reading
    • ESP 3382 The Exceptional Child
    • Methods Block
      • EDS 4330 Managing Diverse Classroom
      • EDS 4350 Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120 Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4262  Seminar in Education
      • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching
  5. Electives (7 hours)
  6. Total (139 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Music with Business Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MUS3303  Music History I
    • MUS3304  Music History II
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (36-37 hours)
    • MUS1000  Piano Proficiency Test
    • MUS1301  Music Literature
    • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
    • MUS1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
    • MUS1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS2000  Music Seminar
    • MUS2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS2305  Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS3230  Orchestration
    • MUS4204  General Conducting
    • MUS4360  Senior Seminar
    • 3 hours in music performance group
    • 8 hours in major instrument or voice
    • 3-4 hours from
      • MUS3305  Vocal Pedagogy
      • MUS3307  Piano Pedagogy
      • MUS1203  Language Diction I
      • MUS1204  Language Diction II
      • MUS3308  Marching Band Techniques
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
    • COM3354  Advertising
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • ACC2301  Principles of Financial Accounting
    • ACC2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting
    • 3 hours from
      • BUA1300  Introduction to Business
      • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • COM4360  E-marketing and Social Media
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • 6 hours from
      • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
      • BUA3306  Consumer Behavior
      • BUA4301  Business Law
      • BUA4304  Marketing Research
      • MGT4306  Human Resource Management
    • 3 hours from
      • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
      • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
  4. Electives (2-3 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Music with Pre-Music Therapy emphasis

Additional requirements for music majors:

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • MUS3303  Music History I
    • MUS3304  Music History II
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (34 hours)
    • MUS1000  Piano Proficiency Test
    • MUS1301  Music Literature
    • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
    • MUS1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
    • MUS1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS2000  Music Seminar
    • MUS2305  Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS2306  Form, Analysis and Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2106  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS4000  Senior Recital
    • MUS4204  General Conducting
    • 3 hours from music performance group
    • MUS1115  Private Guitar
    • MUS1116  Private Guitar
    • MUS2115  Private Guitar
    • MUS2116  Private Guitar
    • MUS4360  Senior Seminar
    • 3 hours from
      • MUS3305  Vocal Pedagogy
      • MUS3307  Piano Pedagogy
      • MUS4320  Elementary Music Methods
      • MUS3308  Marching Band Techniques
  3. Supporting Courses (35 hours)
    • SWK2340  Human Diversity
    • ESP3382  Exceptional Child
    • PSY3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3350  Psychology of Aging
    • 12 hours from major instrument or voice
    • Voice Majors
      • MUS1203  Language Diction I
      • MUS1204  Language Diction II
      • MUS2139  Instrumental Methods for Vocal Majors
    • Instrumental Majors
      • 5 hours from
        • MUS2129  Clarinet and Saxophone
        • MUS2130  High Brass
        • MUS2131  Low Brass
        • MUS2132  Percussion
        • MUS2133  String Methods
        • MUS2134  Flute and Double Reed
  4. Electives (8 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)
    • Pass the piano proficiency requirement of MUS 1000 by the end of the sophomore year, which would mark the conclusion of four consecutive semesters of piano. The proficiency requirement must be met before students begin their student teaching, which makes it necessary for students to continue to enroll in piano until the proficiency examination is passed. The elements of the proficiency requirement are as follows.
      • Harmonization/improvisation of simple accompaniments to melodies of 8 measures length using at least 3 triads (I, IV & V or V7) in block position and then with an arpeggiated bass pattern.
      • Transposition of the same melody to a key one-half or a whole step away with block chords.
      • Sight-reading of grade II piano music in which both hands are independent of each other.
      • Two memorized pieces of the level of Classical Era sonatinas.
      • One 4-part chorale-style piece played with music.
      • Major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, ascending and descending, played in all keys with correct fingerings, one octave hands together, and two octaves, hands separately, with chord progressions of I, IV, I, V, V7, I.
    • Pass a written departmental scales and key signatures test with a minimum grade of 70% at the conclusion of each semester of music theory in order to proceed to the next level of the music theory sequence.
    • Present a performance recital in the major instrument of at least 45 minutes duration prior to student teaching.
    • Attend and document 10 recitals each semester except while student teaching.
    • Participate in at least one music area performance ensemble each semester in which the student is registered for 12 or more hours, except during clinical teaching. Unless approved by Music faculty, the performance ensembles that meet this requirement include Praise Choir, Chamber Singers, and Symphonic Band.
    • Participate in the MUS 2000 Music Seminar each Friday afternoon until graduation or semester of student teaching.

Bachelor of Arts in Music with Worship Ministry emphasis

Additional requirements for music majors:

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • MUS3303  Music History I
    • MUS3304  Music History II
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • MUS1000  Piano Proficiency Test
    • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
    • MUS1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
    • MUS1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II
    • MUS2000  Music Seminar
    • MUS2305  Advanced Music Theory
    • MUS2307  Introduction to Worship Ministry
    • MUS2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I
    • MUS3230  Orchestration
    • MUS3300  Survey of Worship Music
    • MUS4204  General Conducting
    • 3 hours from music performance group
    • 6 hours in major instrument or voice
    • MUS1115  Private Guitar
    • MUS1116  Private Guitar
    • MUS4360  Senior Seminar
  3. Supporting Courses (39 hours)
    • COM3350  Worship Media Production
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • MIN2303  The Ministry of Teaching
    • MIN3301  Family and Congregational Dynamics
    • MIN3303  Contemporary Issues in the Family
    • MIN2322  Christian Spiritual Formation
    • MIN4342  Christian Ministry
    • HTH4342  History of American Christianity
    • 15 hours from
      • ART3306  Art and Children
      • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
      • COM2320  Videography and Photography
      • COM2360  Social Media Communication
      • COM3371  Group Communication 
      • THA3301  Principles of Theatrical Scenery
      • THA3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Additional requirements for music majors:

  • Pass the piano proficiency requirement of MUS 1000 by the end of the sophomore year, which would mark the conclusion of four consecutive semesters of piano. The proficiency requirement must be met before students begin their student teaching, which makes it necessary for students to continue to enroll in piano until the proficiency examination is passed. The elements of the proficiency requirement are as follows.
    • Harmonization/improvisation of simple accompaniments to melodies of 8 measures length using at least 3 triads (I, IV & V or V7) in block position and then with an arpeggiated bass pattern.
    • Transposition of the same melody to a key one-half or a whole step away with block chords.
    • Sight-reading of grade II piano music in which both hands are independent of each other.
    • Two memorized pieces of the level of Classical Era sonatinas.
    • One 4-part chorale-style piece played with music.
    • Major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, ascending and descending, played in all keys with correct fingerings, one octave hands together, and two octaves, hands separately, with chord progressions of I, IV, I, V, V7, I.
  • Pass a written departmental scales and key signatures test with a minimum grade of 70% at the conclusion of each semester of music theory in order to proceed to the next level of the music theory sequence.
  • Present a performance recital in the major instrument of at least 45 minutes duration prior to student teaching.
  • Attend and document 10 recitals each semester except while student teaching.
  • Participate in at least one music area performance ensemble each semester in which the student is registered for 12 or more hours, except during clinical teaching. Unless approved by Music faculty, the performance ensembles that meet this requirement include Praise Choir, Chamber Singers, and Symphonic Band.
  • Participate in the MUS 2000 Music Seminar each Friday afternoon until graduation or semester of clinical teaching.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish Education

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • FOL2301  Intermediate Spanish I
    • FOL2302  Intermediate Spanish II
    • FOL3301  Introduction to Latin American Life and Literature
    • FOL3302  Introduction to Spanish Life and Literature
    • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
    • FOL4301  Survey of Spanish Literature
    • FOL4302  Survey of Spanish American Literature
    • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
    • FOL4360  Senior Seminar
    • ESL3372  Teaching the Multicultural/Multilingual Student
    • ESL3382  Teaching First and Second Language Acquisition
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS3330  History of Latin America
      • Upper level LIN
  3. Supporting Courses (13 hours)
    • FOL1402  Beginning Spanish II
    • EEL3320  Early Childhood Education
    • 3 hours from
      • ART2308  Survey of Arts History II
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • 3 hours from
      • REA3330  Literacy and the Young Child
      • REA3340  Reading, Writing Connection/Observation
  4. Pedagogy and Professional Practice (24 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
      • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • Methods Block
      • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
      • EDS4350  Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4262  Seminar in Education
      • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching
    • Electives (6 hours)
    • Total (127 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    • ENG4313  Studies in Drama
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • THA1161  Theatre Activities
    • THA1162  Theatre Activities II
    • THA1361  Introduction to Acting
    • THA2161  Stage Makeup
    • THA2302  Principles of Acting
    • THA3301  Principles of Theatrical Scenery
    • THA3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting
    • THA3305  Principles of Theatrical Costumes
    • THA4301  Stage Directing Methods
    • THA4304  History of Theatre I
    • THA4305  History of Theatre II
    • THA4324  Studies in Shakespeare
    • THA4326  Literature and Film
    • THA4365  Creative Dramatics
    • THA4368  Play Direction
  3. Supporting Courses (27 hours)
    • COM4330  Communication Internship
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • MUS1111  Private Voice
    • MUS1112  Private Voice
    • MUS2111  Private Voice
    • MUS2112  Private Voice
    • 9 hours from
      • ART1303  Drawing I
      • ART1304  Drawing II
      • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
      • ART3306  Art and Children
      • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
      • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
      • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
      • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society/Tutoring
    • 9 hours from
      • ART3302  Painting
      • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3305  Creative Writing
  4. Electives (12 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Education

This degree prepares students for teaching theatre. Involvement in two or more productions each year provides experience in the areas of acting, set design, musical theatre, and technical theatre. A focus on the UIL one act play prepares students for involvement in directing a competition play. Full-time theatre majors are required to audition for the fall and spring productions, and aid in productions, through performance or as part of the crew.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    • ENG4313  Studies in Drama
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • THA1161  Theatre Activities
    • THA1162  Theatre Activities II
    • THA1361  Introduction to Acting
    • THA2161  Stage Makeup
    • THA2302  Principles of Acting
    • THA3301  Principles of Theatrical Scenery
    • THA3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting
    • THA3305  Principles of Theatrical Costumes
    • THA4301  Stage Directing Methods
    • THA4304  History of Theatre I
    • THA4305  History of Theatre II
    • THA4324  Studies in Shakespeare
    • THA4326  Literature and Film
    • THA4365  Creative Dramatics
    • THA4368  Play Direction
  3. Supporting Courses (14 hours)
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • 3 hours from COM
    • 9 hours from
      • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
      • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
      •  
      • ART3306  Art and Children
      • COM3371  Group Communications
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3305  Creative Writing
  4. Pedagogy and Professional Practice (27 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • EDS2310  Foundations in Education
      • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
      • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
    • 3 hours from
      • EDS4340  Reading, Writing, and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
      • REA3340  The Reading Writing Connection
      • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child
    • Methods Block
      • EDS 4330 Managing Diverse Classroom
      • EDS 4350 Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4262  Seminar in Education
      • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching
  5. Electives (8 hours)
  6. Total (133 hours)

Minor in Art

(18 hours)

  • ART1303  Drawing I
  • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
  • 3 hours from ART
  • 9 hours from upper level ART

Minor in Art History

(18 hours)

  • ART2307  Survey of Art History I
  • ART2308  Survey of Art History II
  • ART3305  History of Modern Art
  • ART4302  History of Art in the United States
  • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
  • ART4352  Special Topics in Art History through Study Abroad Experience

Minor in Communication

(18 hours)

  • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
  • COM2348  Communication Theory
  • COM4345  Rhetorical Analysis
  • COM4374  Persuasive Communication
  • COM4352  Special Topics in Advanced Public Address
  • 3 hours from
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Address
    • COM3371  Group Communication
    • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
    • COM4352  Special Topics in Communication and Conflict

Minor in Music

(20 hours)

  • MUS1305  Elementary Music Theory I
  • MUS1306  Elementary Music Theory II
  • MUS3230  Orchestration
  • MUS4204  General Conducting
  • MUS3304  Music History II
  • 3 hours from
    • MUS4311  Secondary Choral Methods
    • MUS4312  Secondary Instrumental Methods
    • MUS3303  Music History I
  • 2 hours from private lessons
  • MUS2000  Music Seminar
  • Participation in 4 semesters of choir or band, at least 2 for credit

Minor in Spanish

(20 hours)

  • FOL1401  Beginning Spanish I
  • FOL1402  Beginning Spanish II
  • FOL2301  Intermediate Spanish I
  • 9 upper level hours in Spanish

Minor in Theatre

(18 hours)

  • THA4304  History of Theatre I
  • THA4305  History of Theatre II
  • 3 hours from
    • THA4324  Studies in Shakespeare
    • THA4365  Creative Dramatics
  • Participation in at least two university theatrical productions required
  • Select 9 hour Track from
  • Acting Track
    • THA1361  Introduction to Acting
    • THA2302  Principles of Acting
    • THA4301  Stage Directing Methods
  • Technical Track
    • THA3301  Principles of Theatrical Scenery
    • THA3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting
    • THA3305  Principles of Theatrical Costumes

School of Education

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The School of Education is recognized for preparing educators who are ready for the classroom. Even though theory is at the core, significant time is spent in very practical applications of the current best practices in the classroom. The traditional programs in education have a strong field-based component, allowing pre-service educators a variety of opportunities to work with children in the early childhood, middle school, and/or high school settings. Alternative programs are also available for individuals who have a bachelor's degree and would like to pursue educator certification. The overall design of the program stems from careful review, state and national standards, and the best practices defined in current research and application. Other special features of the program include the following.

  • Collaboration initiatives with local school districts to improve the education of students and the professional development of faculty.
  • Student organizations such as Kappa Delta Pi National Honor Society (KDP) to provide for professional growth and the development of team spirit.
  • A media center including a curriculum lab and library to assist students in the preparation of teaching materials.
  • A variety of certification programs to meet specific needs.
  • Individuals seeking certification in early childhood, middle school, or high school setting typically earn the Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (BSIS) degree. The faculty of the School of Education will serve as advisors and mentors to education majors.

Faculty

  • David Boyer, Ed.D., Dean of the School of Education
  • Sam Ayers, Ed.D.
  • Tonia Boyer, M.Ed.
  • Connor Bryant, M.Ed.
  • Dawn Cox, M.Ed.
  • Jerry Jerabek. M.Ed.
  • Annette Mahan, M.Ed.
  • Karissa Ramos. M.Ed.

Degrees

Educator Certification Program

The Lubbock Christian University Educator Certification Program is accredited by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) and holds membership in the Consortium of State Organizations for Teacher Education (CSOTTE), Texas Association for Colleges of Teacher Education (TACTE), Texas Directors of Field Experiences (TDFE), Texas Association of Certification Officers (TACO), Independent Colleges and Universities in Texas (ICUT), and Texas Coordinators for Teacher Certification and Testing (TCTCT).

Certification Programs

The university offers the following approved certification programs.  These programs meet the requirements for certification in the state of Texas.  Students interested in seeking certification in a state other than Texas should notify the Director of Certification in the School of Education for more information.  Additional information is also available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

  • Early Childhood Education Core Subjects EC-6–Certification to teach all subject areas in pre-kindergarten through grade 6.
  • Middle School Education-Specialist (Grades 4-8)–Certification to teach grades 4–8 in a particular teaching field. Teaching field options include Math, Science, English, Reading/Language Arts, and Social Studies.
  • Secondary Education (Grades 7-12)–Certification to teach grades 7-12 in one teaching field. Teaching field options include Mathematics, Chemistry, Life Science, Physical Science, Composite Science, English, History, and Composite Social Studies.
  • All-Level Education (Grades EC-12)–Certification for EC-12th grade Art, Music, Physical Education, Spanish, or Theatre arts.

Education coursework is designed to prepare teachers to integrate technology into instruction that is consistent with TEA/ISTE Technology Application standards while also training educators to effectively collect, manage, and analyze data in order to enhance student academic achievement. EEL/EDS 2320, EDS 4310, and EEL 4320 focus on these standards.

Certification programs are subject to change by the accrediting agencies. Students should check with their academic department advisor for exact requirements.

Educator Certification Council Policies

The Educator Certification Council (ECC) is responsible for ensuring that educator certification candidates possess the basic skills and qualities necessary to perform their duties in a professional and Christ-like manner. The council is comprised of deans and faculty representing the departments offering educator certification. The council meets twice each long semester. As required by the Texas Education Agency, the council has established admission requirements for all programs of study leading to educator certification. All program applicants must:

Phase I: Admission to the Educator Certification Program (ECP)

Undergradute students must be admitted to the ECP prior to Methods. Applications must be submitted to the Director of Certification by October 15 or March 15. The Educator Certification Council (ECC) reviews completed applications each semester.

Criteria for Admissions to the ECP

  • Reading–THEA minimum score of 250; a maximum of 3 times taken
  • Mathematics–THEA minimum score of 230; a maximum of 3 times taken
  • Writing–THEA minimum score of 230; a maximum of 3 times taken
  • Oral Communication–grade of at least a C in COM 2340, ENG 1301 and ENG 1302
  • Completion UNI 2000
  • Successful completion of 60 hours
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.75 on a 4.00 scale
  • Successful completion of 12 hours in academic specialization (15 hours for Mathematics or Science) with minimum GPA of 2.75. University Core courses do not count toward the required hours.
  • Military Service–see Director of Certification for policy on awarding transfer credit
  • No previous felony or misdemeanor convictions. In compliance with 19 TAC 141.5, the State Board will conduct a background check for Educator Certification with the Texas Department of Public Safety. Applicants may contact the Director of Certification for additional information.

Submission of an application portfolio containing the following items:

  • Recent photograph
  • Unofficial copies of all university transcripts
  • Documentation of THEA scores
  • Recommendations from two faculty members from outside of the School of Education who are familiar with the student’s academic achievement and potential as an educator. One of these recommendations must come from a faculty member within the academic specialization area.

Master's Degree Candidates

Students must be admitted to the ECP upon enrollment to the University. Applications must be submitted to the Director of Certification by October 15 or March 15. The Educator Certification Council reviews completed applications each semester.

Criteria for candidacy in the Educator Certification Program leading to certification with the Texas Education Agency.

  • A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 on the last 60 hours in the Baccalaureate degree and maintained throughout certification program coursework.
  • Met all university enrollment qualifications to begin the appropriate master's program.
  • Master of Arts in Teaching applicants must successfully complete the Pre-Admission Certification Test (PACT) in the appropriate content field prior admission to the Education Certification Program.
  • No previous felony or misdemeanor convictions. In compliance with 19 TAC 141.5, a computer background check will be made by the State Board for Educator Certification with the Texas Department of Public Safety. Applicants may contact the Director of Certification for additional information.
  • Submit the completed application for candidacy to the Director of Certification.
  • Successful completion of 12 hours in academic specialization (15 hours for Mathematics or Science) with minimum GPA of 2.75.
  • Students who earned degrees from outside the United States must also score 26 or higher in each section of the TOEFL IBT.

Educator Qualities

Applicants must demonstrate the teaching qualities outlined in the ECP Mission Statement or demonstrate a potential for positive development of these qualities. The Educator Certification Council (ECC) will evaluate these qualities through an analysis of the faculty recommendations, faculty interviews and the student self-evaluations that are included in the application portfolio. Interviews are required and will be scheduled. Educator qualities include the following.

  • View teaching as a mission and ministry
  • Have a desire to help others
  • Have a commitment to the welfare of children
  • Possess high moral and ethical standards
  • Demonstrate openness to new ideas
  • Possess effective oral and written communication skills
  • Demonstrate emotional and physical health
  • Demonstrate creative problem solving skills
  • Demonstrate leadership
  • Demonstrate strong academic background

Review of Application Portfolios

The School of Education will examine completed application portfolios. The ECC will review the application portfolio and vote to approve or deny admission into the ECP. If admission is denied, applicants may reapply to the Director of Certification. If the council denies admission to an applicant that has met the basic academic criteria, a process for appeal is available through the Dean of the School of Education.

Phase II: Candidacy in the Educator Certification Program

After formal admittance to the ECP, candidates should seek approval for the content TExES from the appropriate department chair. The content department chair will submit testing authorization to the director of certification. The candidate must complete the appropriate TExES content test within 45 days of this approval to test.

Admission to the Educator Certification Program

The council will review each complete application and vote to either approve or deny admission to candidacy. If the council denies admission to an applicant who has met the basic academic criteria, a process for appeal is available through the Dean of the School of Education. Upon letter of approval of entrance to the Educator Certification Program, Program Chairs/Coordinators will approve a candidate to take their Content TExES exam. A candidate must complete that test within 45 days of notice of approval to test.

Clinical Teaching Standards

Submit an application for candidacy to the Field Office Coordinator by October 15 or March 15 to be eligible to enroll in clinical teaching for the following semester.

Progression to clinical teaching is based on the following criteria for undergraduate candidates.

  • Successful completion of the content TExES exam in the appropriate certification field.
  • Successful completion of 110 hours applicable to the academic plan.
  • A minimum overall GPA of 2.75.
  • A minimum GPA of 2.75 and a grade of C or above in both academic specialization and major.
  • Recommendations from the professional educators who supervised the pre-clinical teaching field experience.
  • Freedom from physical, speech, hearing, or emotional handicaps that are detrimental to teaching.

Phase III: ECP Recommendation for Certification to Texas Education Agency

  • Successful completion of all candidacy requirements.
  • A minimum grade of B or better in clinical teaching is required to receive a recommendation for a certificate.
  • Complete LCU graduation requirements with degree and date earned on transcript, or an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited university with sufficient coursework in an approved academic content field and professional development coursework to meet the state requirements for an educator certificate.
  • Demonstration of high moral and ethical character through the TEA approved Teacher Ethics Training.
  • Successful completion of the EC-12 PPR TExES certification exam.

Candidates may contact the office of the Director of Certification during the clinical teaching semester for questions regarding state certification procedures. When a candidate has met all requirements and submitted all fees, the School of Education will recommend the candidate for certification to the Texas Education Agency.

Complaints

The university Educator Preparation Program encourages its participants and students to discuss their concerns with an appropriate program employee and make every reasonable effort to resolve concerns informally. However, participants in the program may submit written complaints at any time. Neither the program nor any program employee shall retaliate against participants for raising concerns or for submitting written complaints. Written complaints may be submitted using the university complaint system which is linked on the student right to know web page on the university web site. Procedures for resolving complaints and for appealing decisions are also provided on that link. If any complainant is not satisfied with an outcome, the complainant may file a complaint against the program with the Texas Education Agency. The Texas Education Agency complaint process can be found at this link. The Texas Education Agency complaint process is also linked on the student right to know web page on the university web site.

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Childhood Education

Requirements to be certified to teach age 4/Pre-K through 6th grade (Core Subjects EC6).

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • HIS2350  Texas History
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Academic Specialization Core (36-38 hours)
    • BIO1303  Integrated Science I
    • BIO1304  Integrated Science II
    • EEL2307  Conceptual Development of Math for Elementary Teachers I
    • EEL2308  Conceptual Development of Math for Elementary Teachers II
    • EEL3320  Early Childhood Education
    • GEG2300  Regional Geography of the World
    • ENG3300  Literature for Children and Young Adults
    • EEL3306  Integrated Social Studies
    • REA3330  Literacy and the Young Child
    • REA3340  Reading Writing Connection
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • 4-6 hours from
      • ART3306  Art and Children
      • ESS2142  Theory and Practice IV
      • MUS4320  Music Processes
  3. Major (43 hours)
    • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society/Tutoring
    • EEL2320  Instructional Technology
    • EEL4160  Teaching Certification I
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child/Observation
    • ESL3372  Teaching Multicultural/Multilingual Student
    • ESL3382  First and Second Language Acquisition
    • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
    • Methods Block
      • EEL4180  Teaching Certification III
      • EEL4240  The Elementary School Teacher
      • EEL4301  Social Studies Methods/Practicum
      • EEL4302  Math and Science Methods
      • REA4360  Reading Across the Curriculum/Practicum
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EEL4170  Teaching Certification II
      • EEL4210  Classroom Management and Organization
      • EEL4320  Assessment and Evaluation in the Elementary School
      • EEL4660  Clinical Teaching in the Elementary/Middle School/Seminar

    Notes: Grade of at least a C is required for each academic specialization and major course except for REA 3340, where a grade of at least a B is required. To register for the Methods Block students must meet each requirement for unconditional acceptance into the School of Education.

  4. Electives (3 hours)
  5. Total (127-129 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies in Middle School Education

Requirements to be certified as a specialist in grades 4 through 8.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Academic Specialization (33-36 hours)
    • EDS3340  Middle School Education
    • REA3340  The Reading Writing Connection
    • 3 hours from
      • EEL4301  Social Studies Methods/Practicum
      • EEL4302  Math/Science Methods/Practicum
      • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
    • 24-27 hours in one of the following areas
      • Math-MAT 1310, 1312, 1313, 1402, 3302, 3303, 3305, 4350 (25)
      • Science-BIO 1303, 1003, 1304, 1004, 1305, 4303; CHE 1306, 1106, 3310; NRC 3323, 3023; PHY 1303, 1103 (26)
      • English, Language Arts and Reading-ENG 3300, 3302, 3304, 3317; 3 hours from upper level American Literature; 3 hours from upper level British Literature; 6 hours from upper level ENG (24)
      • Social Studies-ECO 2301; GEG 2300, 3342; HIS 2301 or HIS 2302, whichever was not taken in the core; HIS 2350; 3 hours from World History; 3 hours upper level from History; 3 hours upper level from American History; GOV 2301 (27).
  3. Major (36 hours)
    • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child
    • ESL3372  Teaching Multicultural/Multilingual Students
    • ESL3382 First and Second Language Acquisition
    • Methods Block
      • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
      • EDS4340  Reading, Writing, and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
      • EDS4350  Design and Delivery
    • Senior Practicum Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4262  Senior Seminar
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • 6 hours from
        • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching (required for certification track)
        • 6 hours upper level EEL, EDS, EDU, ESL, ESP, or REA

    Notes: Grade of at least a C higher is required for each academic specialization and major course. To register for the Methods Block students must meet each requirement for unconditional acceptance into the School of Education.

  4. Electives (3-6 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies in Secondary Education

Requirements to be certified to teach grade 7 through 12.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Academic Specialization (48-51 hours)

    Candidates must select either the composite or specialization route to complete this degree. The composite route consists of 48-51 hours in the chosen field listed below under composite teaching fields. The specialization route consists of 48 hours; 30 hours in one specialization content area and an additional 18 hours in a selected area of emphasis. The specialization route should culminate with certification in the area of specialization and the opportunity to add certification in the emphasis area after graduation.

    Composite Teaching Field Route-select one of the following two composite teaching fields.

    • Science-BIO 1305, 1405, 1406, 3300, 3303, 4303; CHE 1307, 1107, 1308, 1108, 3310; NRC 3323, 3023; PHY 1303, 1103, 1304, 1104, and from Texas Tech University or South Plains College, take GEOL 1303, 1101, 1304, and 1102 (50).
    • Social Studies-HIS 1315, 1316, 2350, 3323; 9 hours from HIS 3313, 3315, 4302, 4313, 4314; 3 hours from HIS 4325 or 4326; 6 hours from HIS 3310, 3320, 3330; ECO 2301; GEG 2300 and 3342; GOV 2301, 2302, and 3 hours from GOV (48).

    Specialization Teaching Field Route-select one 30 hour area of specialization and one 18 hour emphasis area.

    • Chemistry-CHE 1307, 1107, 1308, 1108, 3301, 3101, 3302, 3102, 3310, 4311, 4312; and 6 hours from science list.
    • English, Language Arts and Reading-ENG 3302, 3304 or 3305, 3317, 6 hours from upper level American literature; 6 hours from upper level British Literature; and 9 hours from upper level ENG.
    • History-HIS 1315, 1316, 2350, and 3323, 4313 or 4314; 4325 or 4326; 3 hours upper level from History; 3 hours from 3310, 3320, 3330; 3 hours from 3313, 3315, 4302, 4352; and 3 hours from ECO, GEG, GOV or HIS.
    • Life Science-BIO 1405, 1005, 1406, 1006, 3300, 3303, 3003, 3304, 3004, 3305, 3005, 4202; CHE 3310; NRC 3323, 3023; and 3 hours from science list.
    • Math-MAT 1310, 1312, 1313, 1402, 1403, 3302, 3303, 3305, 3350, 4350
    • Physical Science-CHE 1307, 1107, 1308, 1108, 3301, 3101, 3302, 3102, 3310; PHY 1303, 1103, 1304, 1104; and 3 hours from science list.

    Emphasis-The emphasis may be selected from one of the specialization areas or additional options including EC-12: Art, Music, Physical Education, Spanish, and Theatre. Please see content advisor and refer to the major courses listed in the appropriate section of this catalog.

  3. Major (36 hours)
    • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child
    • ESL3372  Teaching Multicultural/Multilingual Students
    • ESL3382  First and Second Language Acquisition
    • Methods Block
      • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
      • EDS4340  Reading, Writing, and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
      • EDS4350  Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4262  Senior Seminar
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching

    Notes: Grade of at least a C is required for each academic specialization and major course. To register for the Methods Block students must meet each requirement for unconditional acceptance into the School of Education.

  4. Electives (3 hours)
  5. Total (132-135 hours)

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree with Educator Certification in Middle or Secondary School

Students seeking to earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree and educator certification must complete the following:

  • Meet the requirements of the BA or BS degree
  • Meet the requirements of the Educator Certification Program
  • Successfully complete a secondary, middle school, or all-level area of specialization
  • Successfully complete the education coursework consisting of:
  • 3 hours from
    • EDS2310  Foundations in Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
  • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child

Methods Block

  • 3 hours from
    • EDS4340  Reading, Writing, and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools
    • REA3340  The Reading Writing Connection/Observations
    • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
  • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classroom
  • EDS4350  Design and Delivery

Clinical Teaching Block

  • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
  • EDS4262  Senior Seminar
  • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
  • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching

Notes: Minimum grade of C is required for each education course, except for EDS 4660 where at least a B is required. To register for the methods block students must meet each requirement for admission into the ECP. Prior to enrolling in the clinical teaching block, students must pass the appropriate TExES exam for their specialization. Students in this program may be eligible to complete a portion of these requirements through an internship. Consult your academic advisor for more information.

Minor in Early Childhood Education

Completion of minor in early childhood education does not include coursework necessary for teacher certification.

(18 hours)

  • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
  • EEL3320  Early Childhood Education
  • REA3330  Literacy and the Young Child
  • 3 hours from
    • ESL3372  Teaching the Multicultural/Multilingual Student
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child
  • 6 hours from
    • ART3306  Art and Children
    • EEL2320  Instructional Technology or IST 2300 Microcomputer Applications
    • ENG3300  Literature for Children and Young Adults

Minor in Secondary Education

Completion of minor in secondary education does not include coursework necessary for teacher certification.

(18 hours)

  • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
  • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
  • ESL3372  Teaching the Multicultural/Multilingual Student
  • ESP3382 The Exceptional Child
  • 6 hours from
    • EDS4340  Reading, Writing and Thinking in Secondary and Middle School
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • ENG3300 Literature for Children and Young Adults

Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences

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Exercise and Sport Science is an intellectual and physical discipline that prepares students for a deeper understanding of physical activity, specifically, exercise and sport. The discipline derives its knowledge base from experiencing physical activity, studying the theoretical bases of physical activity, and experiencing professional practice centered in physical activity.

Faculty

  • Chris Huggins, PT, DPT, ScD, Chair
  • Kim McCullough, M.S.
  • Monica Williams, Ph.D.
  • Brandon Rix, PT, DPT
  • Toby Rogers, Ph.D., Dean of the B. Ward Lane College of Professional Studies

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Athletic Training emphasis

Equips students with prerequisite requirements for specialized programs in athletic training.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • 4 Hours from
      • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
      • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  Univeristy Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ESS1  hour activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4301  Biomechanics
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Emphasis (33 hours)
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • 3 hours from 
      • ESS4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition
      • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
    • ESS4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription II
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • 4 hours from
      • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
      • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
  4. Electives (11 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Exercise and Health Promotions emphasis

Prepares students for careers in fitness or clinical settings working with health, diseased, and injured populations.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • 1  hour ESS activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
    • 3 hours from
      • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
      • ESS4301  Biomechanics
      • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
  3. Emphasis (36 hours)
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • ESS4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition
    • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
    • 21-24 hours (3-4 hours upper level) from BIO, CHE, EDS, EEL, ESS, HSC, PHY, PSY, or SOC
    • 2-5 hours from
      • ESS4230  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4430  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  4. Electives (12 hours)
  5. Total (124 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Pre-Nursing emphasis

Equips students with prerequisite requirements to apply for nursing programs.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • GOV2301  National Government
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ESS1  hour activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription 1
    • ESS4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription 2
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Emphasis (35-36 hours)
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • BIO3301  Introductory Genetics
    • BIO3310  General Microbiology
    • BIO3111  General Microbiology Lab
    • 4 hours from:
      • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
      • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • 3 hours from:
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Growth and Development
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3-4 hours from FOL
  4. Electives (8-9 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Pre-Occupational Therapy emphasis

Equips students with prerequisite requirements to apply for occupational therapy programs.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ESS1  hour activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4301  Biomechanics
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Emphasis (37-38 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • 3 hours from
      • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
    • ESS4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription II
    • 4 hours from
      • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
      • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • 3-4 hours from
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4430  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  4. Electives (9-10 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Pre-Physical Therapy emphasis

Equips students with prerequisite requirements to apply for physical therapy programs.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • ESS1  hour activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4301  Biomechanics
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Emphasis (46-48 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • 3-4 upper level hours from BIO
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
    • 3 hours from
      • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
    • ESS4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription II
    • 3-4 hours from
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4430  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  4. Electives (2-4 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with Sport and Exercise Psychology emphasis

Equips students with prerequisite requirements for graduate counseling programs.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • 1 hour ESS activity course
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
    • 3 hours from
      • ESS4301  Biomechanics
      • ESS4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition
      • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
      • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
  3. Emphasis (37-38 hours)
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • ESS3324  Sport and Society
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • PSY2310  Life Span Human Development
    • PSY3303  Abnormal Psychology
    • 6 upper level from PSY
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 9 hours from PSY, SOC, or HSC
    • 3-4 hours from
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4430  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  4. Electives (6-7 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Athletic Training Emphasis Fast Track

The university has an affiliation with the Texas Tech University Health Science Center (TTUHSC) School of Health Professions (SHP) that provides outstanding athletic training students an opportunity to complete a bachelor's and a master’s degree in five years. Upon completion of the 109 hour program of study, students apply for provisional admission to the TTUHSC SHP Master of Athletic Training Program. Students admitted to the graduate program may transfer the necessary elective hours back to the LCU to fulfill requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree. Important Note: Students admitted provisionally at TTUHSC SHP are not eligible for federal aid until the B.S. degree is complete. For more information, contact SHP Office of Admissions and Student Affairs, 806.743.3220 or health.professional@ttuhsc.edu. Students successfully completing both programs would be eligible to sit for the examination for state licensing and the examination for national certification as an athletic trainer. Specific requirements for Athletic Training Emphasis/Fast-Track are as follows.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • 3 Hours from
      • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
      • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (23 hours)
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise Science and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4301  Biomechanics
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Emphasis (33 hours)
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • 3 Hours from
      • ESS4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition
      • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • ESS4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I
    • ESS4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription II
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • 4 hours from
      • CHE1306 Introductory Chemistry
      • CHE1106 Introductory Chemistry Lab
      • CHE1307 General Chemistry I
      • CHE1107 General Chemistry I Lab
  4. Electives (18 hours taken at Texas Tech)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education

Prepares students to take the Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES) in All-level Physical Education and in All-level Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility. Students must meet requirements of the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, the Educator Certification Program and the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
      • EDU3350  Educational Psychology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (34 hours)
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • ESS2312  Team, Individual, and Outdoor Educational Activities
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3332  Foundations of Secondary Physical Education
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4230  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS4300  Foundations of Elementary Physical Education
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  3. Supporting Courses (19 hours)
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • 3 hours from
      • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
      • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
      • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • 12 hours from an advisor approved secondary academic specialization or ESS
  4. Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility (24 hours)
    • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child
    • Methods Block
      • 3 hours from
        • EDS4340  Reading/Writing/Thinking in Secondary and Middle School
        • REA3340  Reading/Writing Connection
        • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
      • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
      • EDS4350  Design and Delivery
    • Clinical Teaching Block
      • EDS4120  Clinical Teaching Orientation
      • EDS4262  Senior Seminar
      • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
      • EDS4660  Student Teaching
    • Electives (3 hours)
    • Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Sport Management

Prepares students for careers in the financial, business, and marketing side of athletics and fitness including promotion, advertising, merchandising, and distribution.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (34-36 hours)
    • ESS1  hour Activity Courses
    • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS2312  Team, Individual, and Outdoor Educational Activities
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
    • ESS3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4230  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
    • ESS4380  Senior Research
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
    • 2-3 hours from
      • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
      • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
    • 3-4 hours from
      • ESS4301  Biomechanics
      • ESS4330  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
      • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
      • ESS4430  Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences
  3. Supporting Courses (31 hours)
    • ACC2301  Principles of Accounting I
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • IST2300  Microcomputer Applications
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
    • 3 hours from
      • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
      • COM3354  Advertising
    • 9 hours, 3 upper level from ACC, BUA, COM, DMA, FIN, IST, or MGT
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (123 hours)

Minor in Exercise and Sport Sciences

20 hours

  • ESS1270  First Aid and CPR
  • ESS2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
  • ESS3340  Motor Learning and Control
  • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
  • 3 hours from
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  • 6 hours from
    • ESS2314  Human Movement
    • ESS3321  Management of Sport
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • ESS3371  Physiology of Exercise
    • ESS4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development

Minor in Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

20 hours

  • ESS1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences
  • ESS2312  Team, Individual, and Outdoor Educational Activities
  • ESS3324  Sport and Society
  • ESS3321  Management of Sport
  • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
  • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  • 3 hours from
    • ESS4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning
    • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
    • PSY3315  Ethics in the Helping Professions
    • PSY3327  Physiological Psychology
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • SWK3330  Maladaptive Functioning

Minor in Sport Management

18 hours

  • ESS2312  Team, Individual, and Outdoor Educational Activities
  • ESS3321  Management of Sport
  • ESS3324  Sport in Society
  • 3 hours from
    • ESS3329  Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
    • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
  • 6 hours from
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • BUA3320  Business Ethics
    • COM3374  Non-verbal Communication
    • MGT3320 Project Management
    • MGT4320  Leadership
    • PHI3305 Ethics
    • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • SWK2340  Diversity

Honors College

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The University Honors College provides students of high academic ability in all majors an opportunity to enhance their college educational experience with challenging and provocative courses as well as opportunities for cultural enrichment, semester internships, and study abroad programs. Honors faculty, the honors dean, and the honors assistant dean, comprise the Honors Advisory Council, which plans and executes extracurricular activities, including luncheons, service projects, and cultural events. Selected alumni and friends of the Honors College comprise the Honors College Advisory Board, which provides strategic advice and feedback about the program.

Benefits

  • Additional honors academic scholarships
  • Intellectually challenging interdisciplinary curriculum
  • Small classes with the honors professors
  • Distinctive transcript and diploma designation as Honors College Scholar or Honors College Graduate
  • Research presentation and publishing opportunities
  • Participation in local, regional, and national conferences
  • Priority access to study abroad opportunities
  • Priority placement in prestigious semester internship programs
  • Eligibility for prominent graduate studies fellowships
  • Enhanced opportunities for graduate and professional school

Affiliations

  • Council on Undergraduate Research
  • National Collegiate Honors Council
  • Great Plains Honors Council
  • National Association of Fellowship Advisors
  • The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

Admission Requirements

Acceptance in the Honors College is based on the following criteria:

First-Time Freshmen:

  • ACT composite score of 27 or higher, total SAT score of 1280 or higher, or CLT score of 85 or higher

Transfer Students:

  • Completion of 6 or more hours of honors courses from an Honors Program or Honors College with a cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher

Current Students

  • Entered LCU with:
    • ACT composite score of 26 or higher, total SAT score of 1250 or higher, or CLT score of 83 or higher; and
  • Written recommendation of a faculty member to the Honors College
  • Cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher
  • Must apply prior to second semester of Sophomore year (typically prior to completing 45 credit hours)

Honors applicants who meet these criteria are reviewed by a faculty committee and may be offered admission into the Honors College. Scholarship amounts for Honors College students are determined after a review of the complete honors application package. Transfer and current students admitted to the Honors College must complete the Honors College curriculum based on the transfer policy.

Honors Tracks

Qualifying students from any major can be admitted into the Honors College. Honors students select from two academic tracks in the Honors College curriculum.

  • Honors College Graduate
  • Honors College Scholar

Honors College Graduate (26-27 hours)

  • 3 hours from Honors BIB Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors ENG Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors Humanities Courses
  • 3-4 hours from Honors STEM Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors Social Science Courses
  • 9 hours from Honors Courses
  • 2 hours from Honors Seminar (1st year and 3rd year)

Honors College Scholar (30-31 hours)

  • 3 hours from Honors BIB Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors ENG Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors Humanities Courses
  • 3–4 hours from Honors STEM Courses
  • 3 hours from Honors Social Science Courses
  • 9 hours from Honors Courses
  • 2 hours from Honors Seminar (1st and 3rd year)
  • Completion of Honors Thesis Program

Honors Thesis Program

To graduate as an Honors College Scholar, students must complete the Honors Thesis Program. Students must apply and be accepted to the Honors Thesis Program before earning 90 credit hours or one year prior to graduation.

The Honors Thesis Program requires students to complete HON4380 (Senior Research), or UGRx388 (Undergraduate Research), and HON4182 (Honors Thesis).

Advanced Credit for Honors Courses

Students who enter the Honors College are eligible for advanced standing credit as indicated in the Advanced Credit Policy with one exception concerning advanced credit for ENG1302.  Advanced credit will be given for ENG 1302 if students have earned at least 28 on the English portion of the ACT or 670 on the SAT Critical Reading test, or have earned credit for ENG 1301 by taking it prior to admission to the university, or by passing the ENG 1301 CLEP test.

However, this credit will be contingent upon completion of the honors core English course, ENG 2307, with a grade of B or better.  If students are eligible for ENG1302 advanced credit and complete ENG2307 with a B or better, they will receive credit for ENG 1302 as well. Students who do not earn a B or better in ENG 2307 must enroll in ENG 1302 in a subsequent semester.

Transfer Policy

First Year Beginning students and Transfer students admitted to the Honors College will complete the Honors College Graduate curriculum on a sliding scale, based on the number of hours transferred.  Transfer students will only be admitted to the Honors College if they have been participants in and received credits from an Honors Program or Honors College at the institution they transfer from.  Current LCU students who are recommended and accepted in the Honors College will complete Honors College requirements based on the First Year Beginning column of Table 1.

Table 1: Honors College Course Requirements

First Year Beginning College Transfer Student*
With 0-24 hours credit With 25+ hours credit** With 31-59 hours credit With 60+ hours credit
Honors College Graduate
(26 hours)
Honors College Graduate
(23 hours)
Honors College Graduate
(13 hours)
Honors College Graduate
(19 hours)
3 hours BIB 3 hours BIB 3 hours BIB 3 hours BIB
3 hours ENG 3 hours ENG 3 hours ENG 3 hours ENG
3 hours HUM, HIS, REL, or PHI 3 hours HUM, HIS, REL, or PHI 12 hours any HON of (H) 6 hours any HON of (H)
3 hours STEM 3 hours STEM    
3 hours Social Science 3 hours Social Science    
9 hours any HON or (H) 6 hours any HON or (H)    
2 hours HON Seminar (HON1154 & HON3154) 2 hours HON Seminar (HON1154 & HON3154) HON3154 HON3154
Honors College Scholar
(30 hours)
Honors College Scholar
(27 hours)
Honors College Scholar
(23 hours)
Honors College Scholar
(17 hours)
HON4380 Senior Research or
UGRx388 Undergraduate Research
HON4380 Senior Research or
UGRx388 Undergraduate Research
HON4182 Honors Thesis HON4182 Honors Thesis

*Only transfer students who bring credits from an Honors Program or Honors College will be considered for the Honors College.

** First Year Beginning students entering with more than 24 credit hours must complete this 23 hour Honors block.

 

Pre-Engineering and Pre-Nursing Honors Students

The university is part of several cooperative programs that enable its students to earn degrees from LCU and degrees or certificates from other institutions (i.e., Pre-Engineering and  Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs). Students admitted to the Honors College who are also in one of these programs will complete the Honors College Graduate curriculum based on the second column in Table 1 (30 hours transferred/2nd year).

In addition to the minimum requirements stated above, all Honors students must also complete the Honors Thesis Program to be named Honors College Scholars.

 

Faculty

  • Stacy Patty, Ph.D., Dean of the Honors College and Hancock College of Liberal Arts
  • Olga Pahom, Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Honors College

Various additional faculty from the university serve the Honors College with annual appointments.

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.  This degree is administered by the Honors College.  Students are not required to be members of the Honors College but students who are not members of the Honors College must apply for admission to the degree program.  Application will be available upon successful completion of LIN2301 Introduction to Linguistics.

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with Bible Translation Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • BIL2311  Elementary Greek I
    • BIL2322  Elementary Greek II
    • BIL3331  Intermediate Greek I
    • 6 hours concentration in either Greek or Greek and Hebrew
      • Greek
        • BIL3342  Intermediate Greek II
        • BIL4351  Advanced Greek I
      • Greek and Hebrew
        • BIL3313  Elementary Hebrew I
        • BIL3324  Elementary Hebrew II
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with English as a Second Language Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • ESL3372  Teaching the Multicultural/Multilingual Student
    • ESL3382  First and Second Language Acquisition
    • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
    • REA3330  Literacy and Young Children
    • REA3340  The Reading Writing Connection
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with Forensic Linguistics Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • 15 hours from
      • CRJ2303  Criminal Investigations
      • CRJ2305  Courts and Criminal Procedure
      • CRJ4313 Legal Writing and Analysis
      • CRJ3311  White Collar Crime
      • CRJ4325  Forensic Computer Examination
      • HSC3326  Family stress, Crisis, and Resilience
      • PSY4321  Forensic Psychology
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with Language and Technology Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • 15 hours from
      • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
      • IST2325  Advanced Programming Concepts
      • IST3311  Management Information Systems
      • IST3341  Database Management Systems
      • IST4340  Network Security
      • IST4380  Systems Analysis and Design
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with Spanish Language and Culture Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • FOL3302  Introduction to Spanish Life and Literature
    • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
    • FOL4301  Survey of Spanish Literature
    • FOL4302  Survey of Spanish American Literature
    • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with Pre-Speech Pathology Emphasis

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • GOV2301  National Government
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • 3 hours from
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
      • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • 12 hours from
      • ESS4382  Life Span Motor Development
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • LIN4352  Special Topics
      • PSY3327  Physiological Psychology
      • PSY4307  Learning, Cognition, and Emotion
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • 1 hour from
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab
      • PHY1103  General Physics Lab
    • 6 upper level hours from AFA, Fine Arts History, ENG, GOV, HIS, PHI, REL, FOL, or BIL
  4. Electives (9-11 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics with World Languages Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39-41 hours)
    • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
    • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
    • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
    • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • 3 hours upper level LIN
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • 12-14 hours FOL (must be same language)
    • 3 hours Senior Research or Internship
    • 15 hours from 2 different languages (at least 3 hours must be upper level)
      • 9 hours in one language
      • 6 hours in another language
  3. Supporting Courses (15 hours)
    • 3 hours BIO, CHE, NRC, PHY
    • 6 hours upper level GOV, HIS, ENG
    • 6 hours from (verify emphasis requirements prior to registering in these hours)
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM3374  Nonverbal Communication
      • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG4301  Multicultural Literature
      • FOL3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication
      • FOL4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition
      • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
      • MIS2332  Missionary Anthropology
      • 3 hours from
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY4305  Experimental Psychology
      • REL3313  World Christianity
      • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Minor in Honors Studies

The Honors Studies Minor is interdisciplinary. The minor is limited to

  • Any LCU student who is not a member of the Honors College
  • Former Honors College students who are no longer participants in the Honors College.

All courses must be Honors courses (HON prefix or (H) in the course description).  The minor must meet the following criteria:

  • Completion of 18 semester hours, 9 of which must be upper level
  • No more than 9 semester hours from the major may be counted toward the minor
  • At least 6 semester hours not directly related to the major
  • Completion of the minor with at least a 3.40 grade point average

Minor in Linguistics

18 Hours

  • LIN2301  Introduction to Linguistics
  • LIN3301  Grammatical Analysis
  • LIN3302  Phonetics and Phonology
  • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
  • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
  • LIN4352  Special Topics

Up to 6 hours of language-related coursework from other disciplines can count towards the linguistics minor with the approval of the linguistics minor coordinator.

Department of Humanities

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Faculty

  • Ronna Privett, Ph.D., Chair
  • Shenai Alonge, M.A.
  • Jana Anderson, M.A.
  • Matt Byars, Ph.D.
  • Tim Byars, J.D.
  • Carole Carroll, Ph.D.
  • Kregg Fehr, Ph.D.
  • Kenneth Hawley, Ph.D.
  • Gary Lindsey, Ph.D.
  • Amy Miles, M.A.
  • Keith Owen, Ph.D.

Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 3 hours from AFA 2350 or History of ART, THA, or MUS
    • 3 hours from REL 3301 or upper level PHI
  2. Major (30 hours)
    • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 6 hours upper level ENG
    • 3 hours upper level HIS
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • HUM4380  Senior Research
  3. Supporting Courses (21-23 hours)
    • 6-8 hours in FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours in HSC, PSY, or SOC
    • 12 hours from one of the following areas (all 12 hours need to be in the same discipline with minor exceptions for prerequisites if needed)
      • ACC (Accounting)
      • ART (Art)
      • BIO (Biology)
      • BUA (Business Administration)
      • CFM (Children’s Ministry)
      • CHE (Chemistry)
      • COM (Communications)
      • DMA (Digital Media Applications)
      • ECO (Economics)
      • FIN (Finance)
      • FOL (Foreign Language)
      • IST (Information Systems)
      • MAT (Math)
      • MGT (Management)
      • MIS (Missions)
      • NRC (Natural Resource Conservation)
      • YFM (Youth and Family Ministry)
  4. Specialization or Minor (18 hours)
    • Specialization
      • 18 hours from one area, 12 of which must be upper level
    • Minor
      • 18 hours as defined by minor department
  5. Electives (10-12 hours)
  6. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in English with Creative Writing Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    • ENG3302  Introduction to English Studies
    • ENG3305  Introduction to Creative Writing
    • ENG4304  Fiction Writing Workshop
    • ENG4308  Poetry Writing Workshop
    • 9 hours from upper level ENG
    • HUM4380  Senior Research
  3. Supporting Courses (30-32 hours)
    • 6-8 hours from FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours upper level HIS
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • 12 hours from one of the following areas (all 12 hours need to be in the same discipline with minor exceptions for prerequisites if needed)
      • ACC (Accounting)
      • ART (Art)
      • BIO (Biology)
      • BUA (Business Administration)
      • CFM (Children’s Ministry)
      • CHE (Chemistry)
      • COM (Communications)
      • DMA (Digital Media Applications)
      • ECO (Economics)
      • FIN (Finance)
      • FOL (Foreign Language)
      • IST (Information Systems)
      • LIN (Linguistics)
      • MAT (Math)
      • MGT (Management)
      • MIS (Missions)
      • NRC (Natural Resource Conservation)
      • YFM (Youth and Family Ministry)
    • 6 hours from
      • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
      • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
  4. Minor or Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in English with Journalism Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
    • ENG3305  Introduction to Creative Writing
    • 6 hours from upper level GOV or HIS
    • 9 hours from
      • COM1101, 2101  Yearbook
      • COM1105, 2105  Campus Newspaper
      • COM3301  Sports Writing and Reporting
      • COM3343  News Reporting
      • Up to 6 hours upper level ENG
    • HUM4330  Internship
  3. Supporting Courses (30-32 hours)
    • 6-8 hours from FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours upper level HIS
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • 12 hours from one of the following areas (all 12 hours need to be in the same discipline with minor exceptions for prerequisites if needed)
      • ACC (Accounting)
      • ART (Art)
      • BIO (Biology)
      • BUA (Business Administration)
      • CFM (Children’s Ministry)
      • CHE (Chemistry)
      • COM (Communications)
      • DMA (Digital Media Applications)
      • ECO (Economics)
      • FIN (Finance)
      • FOL (Foreign Language)
      • IST (Information Systems)
      • LIN (Linguistics)
      • MAT (Math)
      • MGT (Management)
      • MIS (Missions)
      • NRC (Natural Resource Conservation)
      • YFM (Youth and Family Ministry)
    • 6 hours from
      • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
      • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
  4. Minor or Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in English with Literature Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    •  
    • ENG3302  Introduction to English Studies
    • 6 hours from
      • ENG3311  American Novel
      • ENG3313  American Literature to 1890
      • ENG3321  African-American Literature
      • ENG3322  American Literature since 1890
    • 6 hours from
      • ENG4315  British Writers to 1800
      • ENG4316  English Novel
      • ENG4323  British Writers since 1800
      • ENG4324  Shakespeare
    • 6 hours from upper level ENG
    • HUM4380  Senior Research
  3. Supporting Courses (30-32 hours)
    • 6-8 hours from FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours upper level HIS
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • 12 hours from one of the following areas (all 12 hours need to be in the same discipline with minor exceptions for prerequisites if needed)
      • ACC (Accounting)
      • ART (Art)
      • BIO (Biology)
      • BUA (Business Administration)
      • CFM (Children’s Ministry)
      • CHE (Chemistry)
      • COM (Communications)
      • DMA (Digital Media Applications)
      • ECO (Economics)
      • FIN (Finance)
      • FOL (Foreign Language)
      • IST (Information Systems)
      • LIN (Linguistics)
      • MAT (Math)
      • MGT (Management)
      • MIS (Missions)
      • NRC (Natural Resource Conservation)
      • YFM (Youth and Family Ministry)
    • 6 hours from
      • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
      • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
  4. Minor or Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in English with Professional Writing Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • ENG3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar
    • 3 hours from upper level ENG
    •  
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • ENG4318  Research Writing
    • 12 hours from
      • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
      • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
      • DMA3342  Document Design
      • WEB2320  Web Design
      • Up to 6 hours LIN
      • Up to 6 hours upper level ENG
    • HUM4330  Internship
  3. Supporting Courses (30-32 hours)
    • 6-8 hours from FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours upper level HIS
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • 12 hours from one of the following areas (all 12 hours need to be in the same discipline with minor exceptions for prerequisites if needed)
      • ACC (Accounting)
      • ART (Art)
      • BIO (Biology)
      • BUA (Business Administration)
      • CFM (Children’s Ministry)
      • CHE (Chemistry)
      • COM (Communications)
      • DMA (Digital Media Applications)
      • ECO (Economics)
      • FIN (Finance)
      • FOL (Foreign Language)
      • IST (Information Systems)
      • LIN (Linguistics)
      • MAT (Math)
      • MGT (Management)
      • MIS (Missions)
      • NRC (Natural Resource Conservation)
      • YFM (Youth and Family Ministry)
    • 6 hours from
      • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
      • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
  4. Minor or Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in History

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • 12 hours from
      • HIS3310  History of Asia
      • HIS3320  History of Africa
      • HIS3323  Ancient History
      • HIS3330  History of Latin America
      • HIS3341  America and the Middle East
      • HIS4320  Victorian Studies  
      • HIS4325  History of England to 1714
      • HIS4326  Modern Europe 1715 to the Present
    • 12 hours from
      • HIS2350  History of Texas
      • HIS3313  Colonial America
      • HIS3315  Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America
      • HIS3318  The American West
      • HIS4302  Civil War and Reconstruction
      • HIS4313  The Gilded Age through the Jazz Age
      • HIS4314  Recent America
      • HIS4315  The Great War
      • HIS4316  Depression and War
  3. Supporting Courses (23-25 hours)
    • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
    • GEG2300  Regional Geography of the World
    • 3 hours from FIN 2301 Personal Financial Planning or ECO
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • 3 hours upper level ENG
    • 3 hours upper level GOV
    • 2 hours from ESS 1270 First Aid and CPR or 2 activity courses
  4. Minor or Electives (20-22 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Museum and Heritage Studies with History Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO1300  Human Biology
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS2350  History of Texas
    • HIS3323  Ancient History
    • HIS4327  Introduction to Museum an Heritage Studies
    • 3 hours from
      • HUM4330  Internship
      • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • Choose one of the following 24 credit hour tracks:
    • 9 hours from
      • HIS3313  Colonial America
      • HIS3315  Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America
      • HIS3318 The American West  
      • HIS4302  Civil War and Reconstruction
      • HIS4313  The Gilded Age through the Jazz Age
      • HIS4314  Recent America
      • HIS4315 The Great War  
      • HIS4316 Depression and War  
    • 6 hours from
      • HIS3310  History of Asia
      • HIS3320  History of Africa
      • HIS3330  History of Latin America
      • HIS4320  Victorian Studies  
      • HIS4325  History of England to 1714
      • HIS4326  Modern Europe 1715 to the Present
    • 9 hours from HIS or Art History
  3. Supporting Courses (24-26 hours)
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • Upper level ENG Literature course
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Museum and Heritage Studies with Writing and Research Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO1300  Human Biology
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS2350  History of Texas
    • HIS3323  Ancient History
    • HIS4327  Introduction to Museum and Heritage Studies
    • 3 hours from
      • HUM4330  Internship
      • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • Choose one of the following 24 credit hour tracks:
    • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • ENG3317  Advanced Grammar
    • ENG4318  Research Writing
    • 12 hours from
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
      • COM4372  Organizational Communication
      • LIN, upper level ENG, upper level HIS, Art History, Music History, or Theatre History
  3. Supporting Courses (24-26 hours)
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • Upper level ENG Literature course
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Museum and Heritage Studies with Art Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO1300  Human Biology
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS2350  History of Texas
    • HIS3323  Ancient History
    • HIS4327  Introduction to Museum and Heritage Studies
    • 3 hours from
      • HUM4330  Internship
      • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • Choose one of the following 24 credit hour tracks:
    • ART1303 Drawing I
    • ART1305  Two-Dimensional Design
    • ART2307  Survey of Art History I
    • ART2308  Survey of Art History II
    • ART4302  History of Art in the United States
    • ART4308  Art Theory and Criticism
    • 6 hours from ART, Art History, Music History
  3. Supporting Courses (24-26 hours)
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • Upper level ENG Literature course
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Museum and Heritage Studies with Business and Media Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO1300  Human Biology
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS2350  History of Texas
    • HIS3323  Ancient History
    • HIS4327  Introduction to Museum and Heritage Studies
    • 3 hours from
      • HUM4330  Internship
      • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • Choose one of the following 24 credit hour tracks:
    • BUA2310  Business Statistics
    • BUA2320  Introduction to Data Analytics
    • COM1351  Principles of Mass Media
    • COM2351  Introduction to Public Relations
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • MGT4306  Human Resource Management
    • 6 hours from ACC, HIS, DMA, or Art History
  3. Supporting Courses (24-26 hours)
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • Upper level ENG Literature course
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Museum and Heritage Studies with Science and Culture Emphasis

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO1300  Human Biology
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • 6 hours from
      • AFA2350  Introduction to Fine Arts or History of Art, Music, or Theater
      • REL3301  World Religions or upper level PHI
      • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  2. Major (45 hours)
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • HIS2350  History of Texas
    • HIS3323  Ancient History
    • HIS4327  Introduction to Museum and Heritage Studies
    • 3 hours from
      • HUM4330  Internship
      • HUM4380  Senior Research
    • Choose one of the following 24 credit hour tracks:
    • BIO1305  Contemporary Investigation in Biology
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab I
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry Lab II
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • 3 hours from
      • BIO3320  Analytical Biotechnology
      • CHE3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods
      • NRC4405  Wildlife and Fisheries Science
    • 3 hours from
      • MIS2322  Missionary Anthropology
      • BIB3352  Special Topics: Biblical Archaeology
      • Missions travel trip course credit
    • 3 hours from
      • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
      • LIN4302  Second Language and Culture Acquisition
  3. Supporting Courses (24-26 hours)
    • ART3305  History of Modern Art
    • BUA3305  Principles of Marketing
    • DMA1300  Introduction to Digital Media
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG2301  Masterpieces of Literature
      • Upper level ENG Literature course
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Writing Grant Proposals
    • 6-8 hours FOL (in one language)
    • MGT3300  Principles of Management
  4. Electives (10-12 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in University Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in University Studies is designed for non-traditional students who have earned some college credit but no degree. This program is reserved for students who have earned at least 45 college credit hours and are at least 25 years of age. The program is offered in an asynchronous online format to allow students flexibility to complete the degree.

The Bachelor of Arts in University Studies specifies 30 hours of upper level coursework, however, institutional policy requires all students to complete at least 39 hours of upper level coursework to successfully complete the baccalaureate degree (see Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees). Students completing the Bachelor of Arts in University Studies will work with their advisor to ensure this requirement is met.

  1. University Core (39 hours)
    • 6 hours from
      • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
      • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
      • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
      • BIB3310  Christian Life
      • 3 hours BIB
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC or PHY
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2170  College Success
  2. Major (36 hours)
    • Liberal Arts Concentration (24 hours)
      • 9 hours from
        • ENG3300  Children’s Literature
        • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
        • ENG3308  Technical Writing
        • ENG3313  American Literature to 1890
        • ENG4324  Studies in Shakespeare
        • ENG4327  Film and World Literature
        • Upper level ENG
      • 9 hours from
        • HIS3310  History of Asia
        • HIS3330  History of Latin America
        • HIS4313  The Gilded Age
        • HIS4314  Recent America
        • GOV3324  Health Care Policy
        • Upper level HIS, GOV, GEG
      • 6 hours from
        • COM3310  Organizational Communication
        • GOV2301  National Government (if not taken in core)
        • 3 hours from (if not taken in core)
          • HIS2301  History of the United States I
          • HIS2302  History of the United States II
        • HIS2350  Texas History
        • HSC3326  Family, Stress, Crisis, and Resilience
        • HSC3328  Parenting
        • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development
        • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
        • PSY3300  Child and Adolescent Development
        • Upper level AFA, BIB, BIL, COM, ENG,  FOL, HSC, PSY, SOC
    • 9 hours from
      • BUA1302  Fundamentals of Business
      • BUA3320  Business Ethics
      • FIN2301  Personal Financial Planning
      • FIN3301  Fundamentals of Real Estate
      • IST1301  Foundations of Information Systems and Technology
      • MGT3300  Principles of Management
      • MGT3310  Organizational Behavior
      • MGT4306  Human Resources
      • MGT4320  Leadership
      • PHI3305  Ethics
    • HUM4360  University Studies Capstone
  3. Electives (45 hours)
  4. Total (120 hours)

Pre-Law

Enroll in B.A. in Humanities with Pre-law as specialization.

Minor in Creative Writing

  • ENG3304  Advanced Composition
  • ENG3305  Creative Writing
  • ENG4304  Fiction Writing Workshop
  • ENG4308  Poetry Writing Workshop
  • 6 hours from ENG writing courses

Minor in English

  • 18 hours from ENG (9 upper level)

Interdisciplinary Minor in Film Studies

  • ENG3326  Introduction to Film Studies
  • ENG4326  Literature and Film
  • 3 hours from
    • HUM4330
    • COM4330
    • Note: A media- and/or film-related internship in another area may be substituted with agreement from the Film Studies minor advisor
  • 9 hours from courses with a film and/or media emphasis. The following courses are recommended:
    • ENG4313  Studies in Drama
    • COM3331  Television Production
    • COM3350  Worship Media Production
    • DMA2344  Multimedia Design
    • DMA3311  Digital Video
    • ENG4352  Special Topics in Film

Minor in History

  • 12 hours upper level HIS
  • 6 hours from
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I; and
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II; or
    • HIS1315  World History and Geography I; and
    • HIS1316  World History and Geography II

Minor in Humanities

  • HUM2300  Exploring the Human Experience
  • 3 hours upper level ENG
  • 3 hours upper level HIS
  • 3 hours upper level GOV
  • 6 hours from ENG, GOV, HIS, HUM, PHI, or Arts History

Minor in Law and Government

  • 18 hours (12 upper level)
    • 12 hours GOV
    • 6 hours from
      • CRJ
      • GOV
      • BUA4301  Business Law

Department of Mathematics

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Faculty

  • Keith Rogers, Ed.D., Chair
  • Ashley Cherry, Ph.D.
  • Brian Fisher, Ph.D.
  • Ann Sims, M.A.

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

  1. University Core (47 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • 4 hours from
      • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (32 hours)
    • MAT1403  Analytical Geometry and Calculus II
    • MAT2404  Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • MAT3305  Foundations of Mathematics I
    • MAT3306  Differential Equations
    • MAT3350  Linear Algebra
    • 12 hours in upper level MAT
  3. Supporting Courses (35-37 hours)
    • A university offered minor (18-20 hours)
    • 3 hours from
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • ENG3310  Grant Writing
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • IST3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design
    • PHY1303  General Physics I
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
  4. Electives (6-8 hours)
  5. Total (122 hours)

Educator Certification in Mathematics

Students planning to certify to teach are required to take the following courses in addition to the Bachelor of Arts or Science requirements outlined above. Refer to the educator certification section of this catalog for other requirements.

Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility (6 hours)

  • 3 hours from
    • EDS2310  Foundations of Education
    • EDS2320  Instructional Technology
    • EEL2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society
  • ESP3382  The Exceptional Child

Methods Block (9 hours)

  • 3 hours from
    • EDS4340  Reading/Writing/Thinking in Secondary and Middle School
    • REA3340  Reading Writing Connection
    • REA4350  Practical Applications to Reading
  • EDS4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms
  • EDS4350  Design and Delivery

Clinical Teaching Block (12 hours)

  • EDS4310  Assessment and Evaluation
  • EDS4360  Seminar in Education
  • EDS4660  Student Teaching

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics with Pre-Engineering emphasis

The university is part of a cooperative program that enables its students to earn a BA in Mathematics with an emphasis in pre-engineering and a BS in Engineering from Texas Tech University (TTU) or West Texas A&M University (WTAMU). The first five semesters are taken at Lubbock Christian University and the remaining semesters are taken at one of the partnership universities. The BS in Engineering from TTU or WTAMU must first be earned to apply for the Lubbock Christian University degree.

During the second year at Lubbock Christian University, students must apply for and obtain admission to the TTU or WTAMU engineering programs. Other courses may be advised by TTU or WTAMU when a field of engineering is selected. Deviations or substitutions must be approved by the program coordinator at Lubbock Christian University.

  1. University Core (41 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (20 hours)
    • MAT1403  Analytical Geometry and Calculus II
    • MAT2404  Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • MAT3306  Differential Equations
    • MAT3350  Linear Algebra
    • 3 hours from upper level MAT
  3. Emphasis (24 hours)
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • IST1325  Introductory Programming Principles
    • 3 hours from
      • MAT1312  Trigonometry
      • MAT1313  Pre-Calculus
    • PHI3305  Ethics
    • PHY2301  Engineering Physics I
    • PHY2101  Engineering Physics I Lab
    • PHY2302  Engineering Physics II
    • PHY2102  Engineering Physics II Lab
  4. Electives (35 hours from engineering programs at TTU or WTAMU, 24 hours upper level)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Minor in Mathematics

(21 hours)

  • MAT1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
  • MAT1403  Analytical Geometry and Calculus II
  • MAT2404  Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
  • 9 hours upper level MAT

Military Science Program

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Students may pursue a four-year program of instruction that will lead to officer commissioning in the United States Army, in conjunction with earning any baccalaureate degree. See Army ROTC personnel at Texas Tech for qualifications and commissioning plan.

Air Force ROTC Course of Study

  1. Basic Courses (first and second years - 4 hours)
    • AES 1105 Foundations of the United States Air Force I
    • AES 1106 Foundations of the United States Air Force II
    • AES 2103 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I
    • AES 2104 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II
  2. Advanced Courses (third and fourth years - 12 hours)
    • AES 3305 Air Force Leadership Studies I
    • AES 3306 Air Force Leadership Studies II
    • AES 4303 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I
    • AES 4304 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty II

Each class has a corresponding no-credit leadership lab that meets weekly. All classes and labs meet on the Texas Tech Campus.

Aerospace Studies

Students may pursue a four-year program of instruction that will lead to officer commissioning in the United States Air Force, in conjunction with earning a baccalaureate degree. See Air Force ROTC personnel at Texas Tech for qualifications and commissioning plan.

Department of Natural Sciences

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Faculty

  • Andy Laughlin, Ph.D., Chair
  • Rod Blackwood, Ph.D.
  • Bart Durham, Ph.D.
  • Rachel Keylon, M.S.
  • Doug Swartz, Ph.D.
  • Allie Webb, M.S.

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Introduction

The Department of Natural Sciences includes biological, ecological, and agricultural sciences.  The scientific study of the diversity of organisms, including microbes, plants, animals, and humans and the interrelationships among these provide abundant opportunities for scientific careers in research, human health, animal health and production, environmental health and management, and science education. The department bases its approach to the study of science on the biblical view that God is the creator and sustainer of the universe. Students taking courses in the department are introduced to major concepts of biology, ecology, and agriculture such that they can discover and interpret the characteristics of nature as part of the creation of God. Students learn that science is not merely a collection of facts to be memorized, but a process by which to understand the world. Students are equipped to be successful with the skills of careful observation, critical thinking, careful investigation, and effective communication. Major emphases include:

Animal Science and Pre-Veterinary Medicine

The pre-veterinary science degree equips students for a career in veterinary medicine with specialized training in animal physiology and reproduction, as well as research procedures and techniques.

Health Professions Programs

The department offers information-intensive, research-supplemented, and service-oriented programs to prepare students for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, physician assistant, veterinary medicine, and the allied health sciences such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry, and chiropractic science.

  • Pre-Dental: Enroll in Bachelor of Science in Biology
  • Pre-Medical: Enroll in Bachelor of Science in Biology
  • Pre-Health Professions (pre-pharmacy, pre-PA, pre-allied health sciences): Enroll in Bachelor of Arts in Biology

Natural Resource Ecology and Conservation

The degree in Natural Resources Ecology and Conservation provides students with a broad background in natural resources management and conservation with specific emphasis in ecology, wildlife and fisheries management, conservation biology, and environmental science. Students completing this program will be prepared for graduate education or for employment with governmental and private agencies that are directly involved in managing our natural resources. Examples of employment include Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and private environmental consulting.

Science Education

Science content courses are taken by students preparing to teach biological sciences at the primary and secondary levels. Students seeking a degree in science education through the school of education must complete a designated block of science courses and demonstrate competency in science pedagogy.

Undergraduate Research

Field research projects and research in the biotechnology and microbiology labs prepare graduates of the department to enter graduate research programs. Research projects within the department and the biochemistry research lab provide opportunities for student involvement in research and to gain experience in multiple laboratory techniques and procedures.

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (37 hours)
    • ANS1303  Principles of Animal Science
    • ANS3403  Advanced Feeds and Nutrition
    • ANS3314  Physiology of Farm Animals
    • ANS3323  Physiology of Reproduction
    • ANS4313  Concepts in Animal Health and Disease
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO4318  Biometrics
    • NRC2301  Natural Resources and Agriculture
    • NRC3323  General Ecology
    • NRC4200  Senior Seminar
    • NRC4314  Conservation Biology
    • 3 hours from
      • AEC3315  Agricultural Policy
      • NRC3322  Natural Resources Policy, Regulation, and Compliance
  3. Supporting Courses (37 hours)
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • BIO3305  Advanced Zoology
    • NRC1300  Introduction to Wildlife Management
    • 3 hours from MAT
    • 3 hours from
      • AEC3304  Farm and Ranch Management
      • AEC3312  Natural Resources Economics
    • 18 hours from
      • AGR1304  Principles of Soil Science
      • ANS4330  Animal Science Practicum
      • ANS4352  Special Topics in Animal Science
      • ANS4399  Research and Writings
      • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
      • BIO3304  Advanced Botany
      • BIO3310  Microbiology
      • BIO3111  Microbiology Lab
      • BIO3320  Analytical Biology
      • BIO3325  Entomology
      • BIO4112  Animal Physiology Lab
      • BIO4303  Evolution
      • CHE2402  Integrated Organic and Biochemistry
      • ENG3308  Technical Writing
      • IST3323  Geographic Information Systems
      • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
      • NRC3325  Aquatic Ecology and Conservation
      • NRC3333  Geographic Information Systems
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science with Pre-Veterinary Emphasis

  1. University Core (47 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1402  Calculus
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (38 hours)
    • ANS1303  Principles of Animal Science
    • ANS3314  Physiology of Farm Animals
    • ANS3323  Physiology of Reproduction
    • ANS3403  Advanced Feeds and Nutrition
    • ANS4352  Special Topics
    • BIO3310  Microbiology
    • BIO3111  Microbiology Lab
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
    • BIO3305  Advanced Zoology
    • BIO3320  Analytical Biotechnology
    • BIO3406  Vertebrate Anatomy
    • NRC4200  Senior Seminar
  3. Supporting Courses (33 hours)
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • PHY1303  Physics I
    • PHY1103  Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  Physics II
    • PHY1104  Physics II Lab
  4. Electives (8 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Ecology and Conservation

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (37 hours)
    • AGR1304  Principles of Soil Science
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO3304  Advanced Botany
    • BIO4318  Biometrics
    • NRC1300  Introduction to Wildlife Management
    • NRC2300  Environmental Systems
    • NRC3322  Natural Resources Policy, Regulation, and Compliance
    • NRC3323  General Ecology
    • NRC3325  Aquatic Ecology and Conservation
    • NRC4200  Senior Seminar
    • NRC4314  Conservation Biology
    • NRC4405  Wildlife and Fisheries Science
  3. Supporting Courses (37 hours)
    • AEC3312  Natural Resources Economics
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • BIO3305  Advanced Zoology
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • NRC3333  Geographic Information Systems or IST 3323 Geographic Information Systems
    • 3 hours from MAT
    • 12 hours from ANS, BIO, CHE, CRJ, ENG, or NRC
    • 6 upper level hours from ANS, BIO, CHE, CRJ, ENG, or NRC
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Arts in Biology

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 3 hours from SOC or PSY
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (33 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO4202  Biological Literature and Seminar
    • 15 hours upper level BIO
  3. Supporting Courses (46 hours)
    • 3 hours from MAT
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • 12 hours from CHE or PHY (4 upper level)
    • 9 hours upper level from PSY, SOC, or ECO
    • GOV2301  National Government
    • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 8 hours from FOL (in one langauge)
    • 3 hours upper level ENG
  4. Electives (2 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Biology

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from ECO, FIN, GOV, or HIS
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • CHE1307  General Chemistry I
    • 6 hours from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (37 hours)
    • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
    • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • BIO3303  Cell and Molecular Biology
    • BIO3304  Advanced Botany
    • BIO3305  Advanced Zoology
    • BIO4202  Biological Literature and Seminar
    • NRC3323  General Ecology
    • 12 hours upper level BIO
  3. Supporting Courses (38 hours)
    • CHE1107  General Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE1308  General Chemistry II
    • CHE1108  General Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE3301  Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • CHE3302  Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab
    • CHE4311  Biochemistry I
    • CHE4312  Biochemistry II
    • PHY1303  General Physics
    • PHY1103  General Physics I Lab
    • PHY1304  General Physics II
    • PHY1104  General Physics II Lab
    • FOL1401  Beginning Spanish I
    • FOL1402  Beginning Spanish II
    • 3 hours from
      • MAT1402  Calculus
      • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
  4. Electives (6 hours)
  5. Total (126 hours)

Minor in Biology

(19-20 hours)

  • BIO1405  Majors Biology I
  • BIO1406  Majors Biology II
  • 4 upper level courses from BIO or NRC

Department of Nursing

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Faculty

  • LaNell Harrison, Ph.D, RN; Chair
  • Terry Delaney, DNP, RN
  • JoAnn Long, Ph.D, RN, NEA-BC
  • Mark Wilkinson, RN, MBS, DNP

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Associate of Science in General Science

  1. University Core (24 hours)
    • 3 hours from BIB
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY2310  Lifespan Human Development or 3 hours SOC
    • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from GOV
    • 3 hours from HIS
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • Successful Completion of Covenant School of Nursing Curriculum
  3. Supporting Courses (22 hours)
    • BIO2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO3310  General Microbiology
    • BIO3111  Microbiology Lab
    • BIO3300  Genetics
    • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
    • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
    • 3 hours from
      • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
      • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
      • SWK3310  Statistics
  4. Total (88 hours)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). LCU offers two BSN programs. The integrated BSN program is designed for entering freshmen and provides a direct pathway to the BSN that incorporates RN licensure through partnership with Covenant School of Nursing. The RN to BSN program is designed for graduates of associate degree and diploma nursing programs who hold the RN license and is fully online.

Emphasis is placed on self-directed learning, promoting personal and professional growth, providing holistic, appropriate care to individuals, families, and communities, and populations, and encouraging independent action. Students may practice in a variety of health care settings in the Lubbock and the surrounding area. Time is spent in directed and independent practicum activities according to course requirements.

Integrated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (with Covenant School of Nursing partnership)

Note: Students must earn at least a C in major courses.

  1. University Core (46 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310 Christian Life
    • BIO2401  Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2001  Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
    • 3 hours from the following
      • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
      • COM3313  Interpersonal Communication
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • 3 hours from HIS
    • 3 hours from GOV
    • MAT3303  Probability and Statistics
    • NUR3313  Cultural Diversity
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours upper level from AFA, BIL, ENG, Fine Arts History, FOL, GBC, GOV, HIS, PHI, or REL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (59 hours)
    • NUR4100  Introduction to BSN Studies
    • NUR4201  Introduction to Research
    • NUR4302  Concepts of Community Health
    • NUR4304  Concepts of Nursing Leadership
    • NUR4204  Concepts of Professional Role Development
    • Successful completion of Covenant School of Nursing requirements (48 hours)
    • A minimum of a C is required in all nursing courses
  3. Supporting Courses (18 hours)
    • BIO2402  Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO2002  Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
    • 4 hours from the following
      • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
      • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
      • CHE1307  General Chemistry
      • CHE1107  General Chemistry Lab
    • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • BIO3310  General Microbiology
    • BIO3111  Microbiology Lab
  4. Total (123 hours)

Admission Requirements for Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

The RN to BSN program is designed for graduates of associate degree and diploma nursing programs who hold the RN license. The Bachelor of Science (RN to BSN) program is delivered online.

  • Admission to the university
  • Current CPR certification (if not currently employed as a nurse)
  • Evidence of current or pending RN license
  • Graduation from an accredited school of nursing
  • Evaluation of official transcripts for each college or university attended
  • Minimum of C in any prerequisite course and a GPA of 2.5 on 4.0 scale

Additional Requirements

  • Student liability insurance fee of $65 is billed to students annually.
  • Criminal background checks are required prior to enrollment. Information is available in the Department of Nursing office.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

Note: Students must earned at least a C in major courses.

  1. University Core (33 hours)
    • BIO2401  Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO2402  Anatomy and Physiology II
    • CHE1306  Introductory Chemistry
    • CHE1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • GOV2301  National Government
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • 3 hours from BIB
  2. Major (29-30 hours)
    • NUR3200  Introduction to BSN Program
    • NUR3214  History and Theory of Nursing
    • NUR3314  Trends and Issues
    • NUR4311  Nursing Research
    • NUR4314  Leadership and Management I
    • NUR4316  Leadership and Management II
    • NUR4318  Professional Role Development
    • NUR4403  Community Health I
    • NUR4305  Community Health II
    • 3-4 hours from
      • NUR3313/3413  Cultural Diversity
      • NUR4320  Comparative Health Systems
      • NUR4321  Comparative Health Systems II
      • NUR4352  Special Topics
      • NUR4399  Independent Study
      • NUR4404  Spirituality in Nursing
    • A minimum of a C is required in all nursing courses
  3. Supporting Courses (13 hours)
    • BIO3322  Nutrition
    • BIO3301  Introductory Genetics
    • BIO3310  General Microbiology
    • BIO3111  Microbiology Lab
    • PSY3310  Psychological Statistics
  4. Validation (42 hours)
    • Validation is acquired through successful completion of NUR 3200
  5. Electives (2-3 hours)
  6. Total (120 hours)

Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice

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Faculty

  • Jill Johnson Ph.D., LMSW, Chair
  • Craig Allen, M.S.
  • Jennifer Dabbs, Ph.D.
  • Tony Parnell, LCSW, ACSW, LCPAA

Degrees

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Criminal Justice

The purpose of a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is to prepare students to deal with the challenges of a career as a criminal justice professional in a changing society. The criminal justice program will instill in students a comprehensive knowledge of the criminal justice system while educating them to be critical thinkers who can communicate their thoughts effectively in oral and written form. The curriculum will familiarize students with facts and concepts while also teaching them to engage in ethical behavior when applying this knowledge to related problems and changing situations. Graduates from this program will be members of professional organizations dedicated to selfless public service and will be vital in maintaining peace and curtailing lawlessness in our society. Criminal justice graduates find gainful employment in law enforcement, security, the courts, and correctional facilities. Graduates with a degree in criminal justice may find employment in juvenile and adult probation, municipal and county law enforcement, private security, hospital security, investigations, and warrant offices. Many graduates continue their education in law school or other graduate school. Minimum employment requirements in law enforcement generally include the following:

  • Be at least 21 years old
  • Have no convictions for Class A misdemeanor or felony offense
  • Have no convictions for Class B misdemeanor offense in the past 10 years
  • Possess good mental and physical health
  • Meet varying eyesight standards
  • Have good moral character
  • Possess a valid Texas driver’s license with minimum violations

The criminal justice degree is designed to meet the standards established by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS). ACJS encourages baccalaureate programs to reflect a balanced presentation of a broad scope of criminal justice studies. The criminal justice degree focuses specifically on the five core areas identified by ACJS:

  • Criminal justice and juvenile justice processes–law, crime, and administration of justice
  • Criminology–causes of crime, typologies, offenders, and victims
  • Law enforcement–police organization, discretion, subculture, and legal constraints
  • Law adjudication–criminal law, prosecution, defense, and court procedures and decision-making
  • Corrections–incarceration, community-based corrections, and treatment of offenders

Criminal Justice Transfer Credit

To be considered for criminal justice transfer credit, courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher and must be of similar content and level. Courses taken at other institutions are evaluated by the Director of Criminal Justice to determine if and where they will be applied to the criminal justice degree plan. Courses taken five or more years prior to transfer may not be approved for major or supporting course. Transfer credit for CRJ4333 (Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice) and CRJ4140 (Senior Assessment Seminar) is not accepted and must be completed in residence.

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, NRC, or PHY
    • 3 hours from ENG, GOV, HIS, FOL
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (37 hours)
    • CRJ2301  Introduction to Criminal Justice
    • CRJ2302  Fundamentals of Texas Criminal Law
    • CRJ2303  Criminal Investigation
    • CRJ2304  Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement
    • CRJ2305  Courts and Criminal Procedure
    • CRJ3301  Criminology
    • CRJ3302  Juvenile Delinquency
    • CRJ3312  Violent Offenders
    • CRJ3322  Social Deviance
    • CRJ3324  Corrections, Probation and Parole
    • CRJ4140  Senior Assessment Seminar
    • CRJ4313  Legal Writing and Analysis
    • CRJ4333  Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
  3. Supporting Courses (21 hours)
    • SOC1300 General Sociology
    • 18 hours from
      • CRJ3311  White Collar Crime
      • CRJ3321  Understanding Sexual Offending
      • CRJ4326  Terrorism and Homeland Security
      • CRJ4327  Cyber Crimes
      • CRJ4329  Gangs
      • FOL1401 Beginning Spanish I
      • FOL1402 Beginning Spanish II
      • GOV4305  Constitutional Law
      • HSC3326  Family, Stress, Crisis, and Resilience
      • PSY4321  Forensic Psychology
      • PSY4322  Drugs, Alcohol, and Behavior
      • SWK2320  Social Justice
      • 3 hours from
        • SWK2340  Diversity
        • PSY2340 Psychology of Diversity
      • 3 hours from 
        • SWK3330  Maladaptive Functioning
        • PSY3330  Abnormal Psychology
      • SWK3314  Family and Community Violence
  4. Electives (15-17 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Note: CRJ4140 and CRJ4333 must be taken at the university.

Bachelor of Arts in Law Studies

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • 3 hours from
      • PSY1300  General Psychology
      • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • HIS2301  History of the United States I
    • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • 3 hours from BIO, CHE, or NRC
    • PHI2304  Introduction to Philosophy
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (39 hours)
    • CRJ2302  Fundamentals of Texas Criminal Law
    • CRJ2304  Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement
    • CRJ2305  Courts and Criminal Procedure
    • CRJ4333  Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
    • CRJ4313  Legal Writing and Analysis
    • 6 hours upper level HIS
    • GOV3325  History of Law
    • GOV4305  Constitutional Law
    • COM4321  Advanced Public Speaking and Rhetorical Analysis
    • 3 hours from:
      • COM4341  Communication and Conflict
      • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
    • 3 hours from:
      • GOV3314  Comparative Politics and Development 
      • GOV3323  American Foreign Policy and International Relations
      • GOV3331  U.S. and Texas Public Policy
      • GOV3341  American Public Administration
      • GOV4306  Political Theory
    • HUM4380  Senior Research
  3. Supporting Courses (24 hours)
    • ECO2301  Macroeconomics
    • ENG3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric
    • SWK2320  Social Justice
    • 3 hours from:
      • SWK2340  Diversity
      • PSY2340  Psychology of Diversity
    • 12 hours from
      • BUA4301  Business Law
      • Upper-level ENG, HIS, HTH, or PHI
  4. Electives (12 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)
  6. Note: CRJ4140 and CRJ4333 must be taken at the university.

Social Work

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredits the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program at the university. Therefore, graduates are eligible to sit for the social work licensing exam to become Licensed Bachelor Social Workers (LBSW). Additional information for programs leading to licensure or certification can be found here. Types of agencies where BSW graduates often find employment are foster care and adoption, hospitals, schools, military services, child and adult protection, substance abuse, criminal justice, mental health, hospice, home health care, aging, victim services, community outreach, and various other agencies. BSW graduates are experiencing a high rate of admission into Master of Social Work programs and are most often granted advanced standing, shortening the length of the master's program to around 40 hours.

Social Work Program Goals

  • Prepare students for research-informed generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations;
  • Cultivate practitioners that are guided by the values and ethics of the social work profession; and
  • Develop social workers who understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and the consequential need to advocate for economic and social justice, human rights, and respect for all people.

Social Work Program Outcomes

Graduates will be able to:

  • Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly;
  • Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice;
  • Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments;
  • Engage diversity and difference in practice;
  • Advance human rights and social and economic justice;
  • Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research;
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment;
  • Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services;
  • Respond to contexts that shape practice; and
  • Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Social Work Transfer Credit

To be considered for social work transfer credit, courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher and be of similar content and level. Courses taken from programs not accredited by CSWE and courses taken 5 or more years ago must first be evaluated by the Director of Social Work. Transfer credit for SWK 4610 and SWK 4620 is not accepted.

Admission to the Program

Students interested in the Social Work major must see the Social Work faculty for academic and career advising. Any student may enroll in the pre-professional course, SWK 2300. However, only students admitted to the Social Work program are permitted to enroll in SWK 3301, 3302, 3303, 4610 or 4620. Once SWK 2300 is complete, Social Work majors must apply to be admitted to the program. In order to be admitted, students must:

  • An overall GPA of 2.00;
  • Completed ENG 1301 and ENG 1302 earning a grade of C or better in each course;
  • Completed SWK 2300;
  • Completed a written application for admission;
  • Provided a reference from a non-social work faculty member; and
  • Provided a personal reference.

When the above requirements are met, the Social Work faculty will consider the application and grant or deny admission to the Social Work Program. Students will be informed of the decision by email. Applicants refused admission may appeal.

Field Placement

A vital part of the social work program is a 400 hour field placement, which is a required internship completed in the semester prior to graduation. Students complete the internship in a social service agency under the supervision of an experienced social worker. Social work students are required to successfully complete the 400 hours in field in a timely manner, consistent with field practice policy and procedure. It is each social work student's responsibility to plan in advance for the field experience in order to ensure that they will have ample time to complete all field requirements. The vast majority of available and viable field agency sites are capable of accommodating students on a full-time basis during traditional business hours. Options for field sites will generally be limited to these types of agencies. Each student must arrange, in advance, to participate in the field experience on a full-time basis. Failure to do so may prevent a student from advancing in, or completing, the social work program.

Admission to Field

Students are evaluated for readiness before beginning field. Only students meeting this criteria will be admitted into field:

  • Successful completion of all other courses required for the social work degree;
  • Minimum overall GPA of 2.00;
  • Minimum 2.0 GPA in social work courses;
  • Minimum 2.5 average in SWK 3301, 3302, and 3303;
  • Evaluated favorably by the Social Work faculty in professional ethics, values, and behavior using the NASW Code of Ethics;
  • Successful completion of UNI2000;
  • Submission of the Field Placement application; and
  • Successful oral interview with the Director of Field Education.

The 2.5 average in the social work practice courses, SWK 3301, 3302, and 3303, will serve as a measure for determining student potential to engage in effective social work practice. The practice courses provide opportunities for students to demonstrate practice skills. If students have at least an average of 2.5 in those courses, it is assumed they have demonstrated the potential to engage in effective social work practice. Within these practice courses, and other social work major courses, social work faculty also evaluate student ability to recognize and demonstrate social work ethics and behavior. Ethics assignments required throughout the social work curriculum are used as the primary measure for evaluating student knowledge and demonstration of social work values, ethics, and behavior. Ethics assignments required throughout the social work curriculum are used as a measure for evaluating student knowledge and demonstration of social work values and ethics. Social work faculty also formally evaluate social work students on the demonstration of professional behavior in each upper level social work course.

Faculty evaluation of field readiness will occur after the Field Placement Application is submitted. Students are notified of the decision in writing. Students denied admission to field may appeal the decision. If field criteria are met, students meet with the Director of Field Education to discuss guidelines for field and to identify field placement sites. After successful completion, enrollment in SWK 4610 and 4620 is permitted. Students must have the prior permission of the Director of Social Work to take additional courses while enrolled in field.

Criminal Record Implications

Many social service agencies do not allow volunteers and/or employees with criminal backgrounds. Therefore, it may be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to locate an agency where students with criminal backgrounds can complete their field placement. In which case, it becomes the primary responsibility of a student with a criminal background to secure an approved field placement in accordance with the social work degree plan. The State of Texas reserves the right to deny a license to any person entering the field of Social Work with a criminal history. Therefore, upon their graduation students having a criminal background may be denied licensure by the State of Texas for this or any other reason the State deems relevant. Licensure eligibility is the sole decision of the State of Texas.

Bachelor of Social Work

The social work program does not give academic credit for life experience or previous work experience.

  1. University Core (45 hours)
    • BIB1310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • BIB1320  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB3305  Christian Heritage
    • BIB3310  Christian Life
    • COM2340  Communication for the Professional
    • ENG1301  Composition Studies
    • ENG1302  Composition and Literature
    • PSY1300  General Psychology
    • 3 hours from
      • HIS2301  History of the United States I
      • HIS2302  History of the United States II
    • ESS1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness
    • MAT1311  College Algebra
    • BIO1300  Human Biology
    • ENG3308  Technical Writing
    • 3 hours from
      • GOV2301  National Government
      • GOV2302  Texas State and Local Government
    • 3 hours upper level ENG
    • UNI1170  University Seminar
    • UNI2000  University Skills
  2. Major (42 hours)
    • SWK2300  Introduction to Social Work
    • SWK2340  Diversity
    • SWK3301  Generalist Practice with Individuals and Families
    • SWK3302  Generalist Practice with Communities and Organizations
    • SWK3303  Generalist Practice with Groups
    • SWK3304  Social Welfare Policy
    • SWK3306  Social Work Ethics and Professional Behavior 
    • SWK3310  Statistics
    • SWK3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment
    • SWK3320  Social Research Methods
    • SWK4610  Field I
    • SWK4620  Field II
  3. Supporting Courses (18-20 hours)
    • SOC1300  General Sociology
    • SWK2320  Social Justice
    • SWK3330  Maladaptive Functioning
    • 3 hours from
      • SWK3313  Interventions with Older Adults
      • SWK3314  Family and Community Violence
      • SWK3315  Social Work in Criminal Justice Settings
      • SWK3316  International Social Work
      • SWK4352  Special Topics in Social Work
    • 6-8 hours of foreign language and/or multicultural studies
  4. Electives (13-15 hours)
  5. Total (120 hours)

Minor in Criminal Justice

(18 hours)

  • CRJ2301  Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CRJ2305  Courts and Criminal Procedure
  • CRJ3301  Criminology
  • 9 hours from
    • CRJ3302  Juvenile Delinquency
    • CRJ3312  Violent Offenders
    • CRJ3322  Social Deviance
    • CRJ3324  Corrections, Probation, and Parole
    • CRJ4325  Forensic Cyber Evidence Examination
    • CRJ4326  Terrorism and Homeland Security
    • CRJ4333  Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice
    • PSY4321  Forensic Psychology

Minor in Sociological Studies

(18 hours)

  • SOC1300  General Sociology
  • SWK2320  Social Justice
  • SWK2340  Diversity
  • CRJ3322  Social Deviance
  • 6 hours from:
    • SWK3314  Family and Community Violence
    • SWK/PSY3320  Social Research Methods
    • CRJ3301  Criminology
    • CRJ3302  Juvenile Delinquency
    • PSY3381  Social Psychology
    • PSY4342  Qualitative Research
    • HSC3313  The Family
    • HSC3322  Gender and Sexuality
    • HSC3328  Parenting
    • HSC4326  Family and Community
    • ESS3324  Sport in Society
    • COM3371  Group Communication
    • COM3372  Intercultural Communication
    • COM3374  Non-Verbal Communication
    • LIN4301  Sociolinguistics
    • REL3301  World Religions

Graduate Business

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Faculty

  • Russell Dabbs, Ph.D.
  • Laci Richardson, Ph.D.
  • Joshua Sauerwien, D.B.A

Admission to the Master of Accounting program

  • See graduate admissions section of university catalog.
  • Undergraduate students pursuing the 150-hour BBA/Master of Accounting (MAcc) program may be eligible to enroll in up to 6 hours of graduate coursework prior to being within 12 hours of earning a baccalaureate degree. This exception is specific for the BBA/MAcc program and acceptance is dependent upon successful completion of program prerequisite requirements and advisor recommendation. Students will be eligible for unconditional admission to the graduate-level MAcc program upon successful completion of the baccalaureate degree.

Master of Accounting

The Master of Accounting program will prepare students for their callings in the field of accounting and to successfully complete the Uniform Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. Students without an undergraduate business degree may need additional business courses to meet the CPA requirements for Texas. According to ACBSP standards, before a new program can be considered for accreditation, it must be operational with enrolled students for at least two years and have graduates.  The Master of Accounting program commenced Fall 2020.

(30 hours)

  • ACC5315  Financial Statement Analysis
  • ACC5401  Accounting and Tax Research
  • ACC5402  Advanced Accounting and Theory
  • ACC5002  Advanced Accounting and Theory Lab
  • ACC5404  Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
  • ACC5405  Fraud Auditing and Forensic Accounting
  • ACC5406  Advanced Income Tax
  • ACC5006  Advanced Income Tax Lab
  • ACC5408  Accounting Analytics
  • ECO5310  Managerial Economics

Graduate Counseling

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Graduates will have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary for effective intervention in working with individuals, families, and communities. Each of the graduate faculty hold doctorates and have extensive experience in working with families in churches and social service agencies. Each graduate class is designed to help students master the competencies of an effective practitioner. Curriculum utilized in the graduate program has a strong base in current research and current best practices in the field.

Faculty

  • Carlos Perez, Ph.D., Chair
  • Kaylene Brown, Ph.D.,
  • Joshuah Ellis, Ph.D.
  • Macy Williamson, Ph.D.

Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis

The Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs are offered through a combination of online. These programs are designed to prepare students for licensing as a counselor in the State of Texas. The university cannot confirm the program meets requirements for licensing in any other state. Students interested in licensure in a state other than Texas should contact Graduate Counseling for information to assess whether this program meets licensing requirements in that state.  Additional information is also available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

(60 hours)

  1. Mental Health Counseling Core (45 hours)
    • COU5302  Foundations of Clinical Practice
    • COU5311  Lifespan Development and Human Sexuality
    • COU5314  Assessment of Individuals and Families
    • COU5322  Research and Program Development
    • COU5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law
    • COU5353  Psychopathology of Individuals and Families
    • COU5360  Counseling Theory and Practice
    • COU5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling
    • COU5362  Career Counseling
    • COU5363  Group Counseling
    • COU5366  Crisis/Trauma Counseling
    • COU5378  Social and Cultural Foundations
    • COU5379  Systemic and Family Theories
    • COU5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents and their Families
    • COU5384  Addictions
  2. Emphasis (15 hours)
    • COU5356  Advanced Psychopathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning
    • COU5365  Advanced Counseling Techniques
    • COU5386  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum
    • COU5387  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I
    • COU5388  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II
    • COU6063  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Comprehensive Exam

Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy emphasis

The Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs are offered through a combination of online. These programs are designed to prepare students for licensing as a counselor in the State of Texas. The university cannot confirm the program meets requirements for licensing in any other state. Students interested in licensure in a state other than Texas should contact Graduate Counseling for information to assess whether this program meets licensing requirements in that state.  Additional information is also available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

(60 hours)

  1. Mental Health Counseling Core (45 hours)
    • COU5302  Foundations of Clinical Practice
    • COU5311  Lifespan Development and Human Sexuality
    • COU5314  Assessment of Individuals and Families
    • COU5322  Research and Program Development
    • COU5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law
    • COU5353  Psychopathology of Individuals and Families
    • COU5360  Counseling Theory and Practice
    • COU5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling
    • COU5362  Career Counseling
    • COU5363  Group Counseling
    • COU5366  Crisis/Trauma Counseling
    • COU5378  Social and Cultural Foundations
    • COU5379  Systemic and Family Theories
    • COU5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents and their Families
    • COU5384  Addictions
  2. Emphasis (15 hours)
    • COU5357  Advanced Approaches in Couple and Family Therapy
    • COU5358  Working with Family and Systemic Issues
    • COU5371  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Practicum
    • COU5372  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Internship I
    • COU5373  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Internship II
    • COU6065  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Comprehensive Exam

Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling with School Counseling emphasis

The Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs are offered through a combination of online. These programs are designed to prepare students for licensing as a counselor in the State of Texas. The university cannot confirm the program meets requirements for licensing in any other state. Students interested in licensure in a state other than Texas should contact Graduate Counseling for information to assess whether this program meets licensing requirements in that state.  Additional information is also available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

(60 hours)

  1. Mental Health Counseling Core (45 hours)
    • COU5302  Foundations of Clinical Practice
    • COU5311  Lifespan Development and Human Sexuality
    • COU5314  Assessment of Individuals and Families
    • COU5322  Research and Program Development
    • COU5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law
    • COU5353  Psychopathology of Individuals and Families
    • COU5360  Counseling Theory and Practice
    • COU5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling
    • COU5362  Career Counseling
    • COU5363  Group Counseling
    • COU5366  Crisis/Trauma Counseling
    • COU5378  Social and Cultural Foundations
    • COU5379  Systemic and Family Theories
    • COU5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents and their Families
    • COU5384  Addictions
  2. Emphasis (15 hours)
    • COU5343  Introduction to School Counseling
    • COU5344  Counseling in Special Populations
    • COU5394  School Counseling Practicum
    • COU5395  School Counseling Internship I
    • COU5396  School Counseling Internship II
    • COU6064  School Counseling Certification Exam

Master of Science in Guidance and School Counseling

(36 credit-hours, non-certification only)

This program culminates in a degree only and does not include certification. This degree is available only for non-Texas residents. Non-Texas students, or students seeking certification in states other than Texas, should verify the certification requirements in their respective state. Additional information is available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

(36 hours)

  • COU5311  Lifespan Development and Human Sexuality
  • COU5314  Assessment of Individuals and Families
  • COU5322  Research and Program Development
  • COU5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law
  • COU5343  Introduction to School Counseling
  • COU5360  Counseling Theory and Practice
  • COU5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling
  • COU5362  Career Counseling
  • COU5363  Group Psychotherapy
  • COU5366  Crisis/Trauma Counseling
  • COU5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents and Their Families
  • COU5391  Counseling Practicum
  • COU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Graduate School of Theology

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Faculty

  • Brandon Fredenburg, Ph.D., Chair of Academic Affairs
  • Jeff Cary, Ph.D., Dean of the Alfred and Patricia Smith College of Biblical Studies
  • David Fraze, D.Min.
  • Jeremy Hegi, Ph.D.
  • Jesse C. Long, Jr., Ph.D.
  • Michael Martin, Ph.D.
  • Shannon Rains, D.Min.
  • Mark Sneed, Ph.D.
  • Barry Stephens, D.Min.
  • Mark Wiebe, Ph.D.

Degree

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Graduate Certificate Program

To complete a graduate certificate, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements listed in the graduate academic policy section of this catalog.

Purpose

The Graduate School of Theology, as a community for theological reflection and spiritual formation, prepares men and women for service to the Triune God and leadership in various forms of Christian ministry around the world. As we pursue this purpose, we commit to diversity among the faculty, staff, and student body; to equip students for ministry in the global context; and to adhere to rigorous academic standards as we collectively engage Christian scripture and the Christian heritage in awareness of our Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement history.

Master of Arts in Christian Ministry

The Master of Arts in Christian Ministry is delivered in an online format

(33 hours)

  • 9 hours from Biblical Studies
    • BIB6301  Introduction to the New Testament
    • BIB6302  Hermeneutics or MIN 6302 Hermeneutics
    • BIB6310  Introduction to the Old Testament
    • 3 hours BIB
  • 6 hours from Christian History and Theology:
    • BIH6329  American Church History
    • REL6334  Christian History and Theology I
    • REL6335  Christian History and Theology II
    • 3 hours BIH or REL
  • 9 hours from Ministry Studies
    • CFM5303  Congregational Leadership
    • MIN6301  Family Ministry
    • MIN6303  Spiritual Formation
    • MIN6305  Preaching
    • MIN6309  Christian Counseling
    • MIN6323  Family Systems
  • MIN6330  Internship
  • MIN6060  Final Assessment
  • 6 hours from approved elective courses

Graduate Certificate in Children’s Ministry

The Graduate Certificate in Children’s Ministry is delivered in an online format.  Students in this program are not eligible for federal financial assistance.

(15 hours)

  • BIB6302  Hermeneutics
  • CFM5301  Foundations of Children’s Ministry
  • CFM5302  Leading Children’s Ministry
  • CFM5303  Congregational Leadership
  • MIN6301  Family Ministry

Graduate Education

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The graduate program in education offers two 36-hour, non-thesis Master’s degrees, a Master of Education (M.Ed.) for those previously certified to teach in the state of Texas and a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) for those seeking Texas teaching certification.

Faculty

  • David Boyer, Ed.D., Dean of the School of Education
  • Sam Ayers, Ed.D., Program Director
  • Judy Flagle, Ed.D.
  • Gene Sheets, Ed.D.

Mission

The mission of the graduate program in education is to prepare creative and innovative professional educators with high moral and ethical standards who view themselves as agents of change and who are committed to the welfare of children and have the understanding, attitudes, and skills necessary for effective teaching and leadership. Individuals desiring to complete requirements for Texas Educator Certification must apply to the Educator Certification Program through the certification office. Some course work is required in addition to the M.A.T. for completing teaching certification.

Purpose

The purpose of the Master's Degree in education is to provide qualified students with advanced academic training beyond the baccalaureate degree. Graduate education courses are designed (1) to strengthen the professional knowledge base and skills of the graduate student, as both teacher and administrator; (2) to increase independent study and seminar skills; (3) to strengthen the use of traditional research skills; (4) to assist the student in valuing and conducting classroom based research; (5) to increase the instructional leadership skills of the student; (6) to encourage reflective analytical/critical thinking on the part of the student; and (7) to increase the ability of the student to analyze case studies related to educational experiences.

These programs meet the requirements for certification in the state of Texas.  Students interested in seeking certification in states other than Texas should notify the Director of Certification in the School of Education for more information. Additional information is also available in the institutional disclosure statement for programs leading to licensure or certification.

Expectations

Graduate students are expected to assume greater responsibility over their programs of study, to function productively in seminar structures, to conduct research on a regular basis, to read widely and critically in both primary and secondary materials, and to function as professional educators who display ethical and moral behavior and leadership patterned after the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Semester Length

As this program is designed for the practicing professional educator, its academic year is divided into Fall or Spring C1, which last 16 weeks, and Fall or Spring C2 and C3, each lasting 8 weeks, Summer C1 lasting 13 weeks and Summer C5 lasting 10 weeks. Students may enroll in no more than 7 hours per term of evening and/or online courses. Exceptions to the semester hour limit must be approved, in advance, by the advisor.

Educator Certification Program

See information under the same title on the School of Education page.

Curriculum and Instruction

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction offers a program for educational preparation with specialized skills to meet the curriculum needs of professional educators in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education as curriculum specialists. The master’s degree focuses on the collection and evaluation of a curriculum and instructional program using student performance data to identify strengths and weaknesses in the program and the development of a modification and implementation plan to address program weaknesses. Students will build an E-portfolio and present a curriculum and instruction plan to a committee of educators. For students completing a baccalaureate degree in Early Childhood Education, Middle School Education, or Secondary Education at LCU and entering the MED Curriculum and Instruction program within two years of graduation may be eligible to reduce the total numbers of hours up to 6 semester hours. Faculty in the discipline determine coursework required for the degree. A minimum of 30 semester hours for a master’s degree must still be earned.

Educational Diagnostics

The Master of Education degree in Educational Diagnostics will prepare students with the knowledge and skills to be an educational diagnostician. This program is available for those who are already a certified teacher and who meet university graduate program admission requirements. Students must have taught at least two years in a creditable institution before obtaining this certification, but may be enrolled during this period. Students holding a master’s degree have the option of choosing the 24-hour certification route instead. Students who have completed the MAT or MED in Special Education at LCU may be eligible for a 12-hour certification program. For students completing a baccalaureate degree in Early Childhood Education, Middle School Education, or Secondary Education at LCU and entering the MED Educational Diagnostics program within two years of graduation may be eligible to reduce the total numbers of hours up to 6 semester hours. Faculty in the discipline determine coursework required for the degree. A minimum of 30 semester hours for a master’s degree must still be earned.

Educational Leadership

This 36-credit hour concentration will offer students opportunities to develop the knowledge and skills needed to become a school principal or central office administrator as designated by the school. The Masters of Education (M.Ed.) in Educational Leadership program, as well as the principal certification program option available for the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership with either the Curriculum and Instruction or Special Education emphasis, is designed to prepare students to test for certification as a principal in the State of Texas. The university cannot confirm whether the program or courses in the program meets requirements for certification in any other state. Students seeking certification in another state assume responsibility to determine whether the program meets certification requirements in that state.

Students pursuing a Master of Education in Educational Leadership with either the Curriculum and Instruction or Special Education emphasis may complete the master's degree in educational leadership without seeking certification.

Students interested in the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership may choose one of the three options below:

  • M.Ed. in Educational Leadership (36-credit hours)
  • M.Ed. in Educational Leadership with Curriculum and Instruction emphasis (36-credit hour, with optional 12-credit hour principal certification program)
  • M.Ed. in Educational Leadership with Special Education emphasis (36-credit hour, with optional 12-credit hour principal certification program)

Students already holding a master's degree have the option of choosing the 24-hour certification route instead. Students must have taught at least two years in a creditable institution before obtaining this certification, but may be enrolled during this period. The Master of Education in Leadership may be pursued on campus.

Secondary Education

Graduate education offers students an opportunity to participate in advanced studies in teacher education, available for those who have completed a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and meet graduate program admission requirements. Students desiring to pursue the Master of Arts in Teaching degree, who are not certified to teach, must complete six hours of undergraduate clinical teaching beyond the master's degree and meet all Texas Education Agency (TEA) requirements to become certified. Students not pursuing a master’s degree but interested in becoming a certified teacher, may pursue the Teacher Preparation Program in Secondary Education. This 25-hour program allows students to pursue teacher certification and can typically be completed within a year. To meet TEA/SBEC requirements in both programs, students may have to enroll in additional leveling courses.

Special Education

Special education offers students opportunities to develop the knowledge and skills needed to become a special education teacher. Students who have completed a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and meet graduate admission requirements may pursue the Master of Arts in Teaching degree in Special Education with an EC-12 certification. Clinical teaching in a special education classroom is required for this certification. For students who have completed a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university in education, who hold a current Texas teacher certification, and who meet the university graduate admission requirements can pursue the following three options: (1) the 36-hour Master of Education in Special Education, (2) the 36-hour Master of Education in Special Education with Dyslexia emphasis, or (3) the 15-hour Special Education CORE program for those wanting to increase their knowledge in the area of special education and pursue Texas Special Education certification. For students completing a baccalaureate degree in Early Childhood Education, Middle School Education, or Secondary Education at LCU and entering the MED Special Education within two years of graduation may be eligible to reduce the total numbers of hours up to 6 semester hours. Faculty in the discipline determine coursework required for the degree. A minimum of 30 semester hours for a master’s degree must still be earned.

Superintendent Certification

The Superintendent Certification cohort program is a post-graduate program that will develop students’ knowledge and skills which are needed to hold administrative positions at the central office level or superintendent positions. Standards for admission to the Superintendent Certification program are more restrictive than general graduate admission standards in that students must have completed a master’s degree and either hold a principal certificate or have at least three years of creditable managerial experience approved by TEA. Candidate applications will be reviewed by program administrators in conjunction with the Office of Graduate Studies.

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction

Non-thesis degree program in curriculum and instruction for individuals holding a Texas teaching certification.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
  • EDU5302  Advanced Learning Theory and Human Development
  • EDU5308  Assessment and Identification of Educational Challenges
  • EDU5309  Differentiated Curriculum
  • EDU5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5325  Advanced Curriculum Design and Development
  • EDU5333  School and Community Leadership
  • EDU5350  Models of Teaching
  • EDU5351  Capstone in Curriculum and Instruction
  • 3 hours from
    • EDU5312  Exceptionality
    • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Master of Education in Educational Diagnostics

Non-thesis degree program in special education and diagnostic assessment and services for those with a teaching certification and two years of creditable teaching experience.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5340  Achievement Testing/Authentic Assessment
  • EDU5342  Intelligence Testing/Authentic Assessment
  • EDU5343  Cross Battery Assessment for Learning Disabilities
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing the Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5360  Seminar/Practicum for the Educational Diagnostician
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Master of Education in Educational Leadership

Non-thesis degree program in educational leadership for individuals holding a Texas teaching certification and two years of creditable teaching experience. The Master of Education in Education Leadership is offered in a hybrid format.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
  • EDU5303  Educational Technology
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5324  Administration of Special Programs
  • EDU5326  The Principalship
  • EDU5331  Business and Personnel Management
  • EDU5333  School Community Leadership
  • EDU5353  Principal Practicum I
  • EDU5356  Principal Practicum II
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Master of Education in Educational Leadership with Curriculum and Instruction emphasis

Non-thesis degree program in educational leadership for individuals holding a Texas teaching certification and two years of creditable teaching experience. The Master of Education in Education Leadership is offered in a hybrid format.

(36 hours, Principal Certification option 48 hours)

  1. Major (24 hours)
    • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
    • EDU5312  Exceptionality
    • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
    • EDU5320  Educational Law
    • EDU5303  Educational Technology
    • EDU5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership
    • EDU5324  Administration of Special Programs
    • EDU5333  School Community Leadership
    • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination
  2. Emphasis (12 hours)
    • EDU5308  Assessment and Identification
    • EDU5309  Differentiated Curriculum
    • EDU5350  Models of Teaching
    • EDU5351  Capstone
  3. Principal Certification option* (12 hours)
    • EDU5326  The Principalship
    • EDU5331  Business and Personnel Management
    • EDU5353  Principal Practicum I
    • EDU5356  Principal Practicum II

*Program leading to the Principal Certification for those completing the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership with either the Curriculum and Instruction or Special Education emphasis with two years of creditable teaching experience.

Master of Education in Educational Leadership with Special Education emphasis

Non-thesis degree program in educational leadership for individuals holding a Texas teaching certification and two years of creditable teaching experience. The Master of Education in Education Leadership is offered in a hybrid format.

(36 hours, Principal Certification option 48 hours)

  1. Major (24 hours)
    • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
    • EDU5312  Exceptionality
    • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
    • EDU5320  Educational Law
    • EDU5303  Educational Technology
    • EDU5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership
    • EDU5324  Administration of Special Programs
    • EDU5333  School Community Leadership
    • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination
  2. Emphasis (12 hours)
    • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families
    • EDU5346  Behavior Management
    • EDU5347  Assessing Children
    • EDU5348  Adapting Curriculum
  3. Principal Certification option* (12 hours)
    • EDU5326  The Principalship
    • EDU5331  Business and Personnel Management
    • EDU5353  Principal Practicum I
    • EDU5356  Principal Practicum II

*Program leading to the Principal Certification for those completing the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership with either the Curriculum and Instruction or Special Education emphasis with two years of creditable teaching experience.

Master of Education in Special Education

Non-thesis degree program in special education for individuals holding a Texas teaching certification.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5301  Research for School Improvement
  • EDU5303  Integrating Educational Technology
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5329  Content Area Literacy
  • EDU5339  Development in Children
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5349  Advanced Practicum in Special Education
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Master of Education in Special Education with Dyslexia emphasis

Non-thesis degree program in special education with an emphasis in dyslexia for those holding a Texas teaching certification. Students admitted with additional requirements.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5303  Integrating Educational Technology
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5318  Basic Dyslexia I
  • EDU5319  Basic Dyslexia II
  • EDU5329  Content Area Literacy
  • EDU5338  Advanced Dyslexia
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5349  Advanced Practicum
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

Master of Arts in Teaching

Non-thesis degree program in secondary education for those seeking a Master of Arts (MA) in Teaching that may culminate ininitial teacher* certification.

(36 hour degree and 7 or 8 additional hours for certification as listed below)

  • EDU5302  Advanced LEarning Theory and Human Development
  • EDU5303  Integrating Educational Technology
  • EDU5304  Curriculum and Instructional Design
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5313  Classroom Management
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5317  Assessment and Evaluation
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5324  Administration of Special Programs
  • EDU5329  Content Area Literacy
  • Elective 6 hours
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

*Initial Texas teaching certification requires the following additional coursework:

  • EDU5199  Independent Study of Issues Facing Education
  • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching (one semester)

Or

  • EDU5199  Independent Study of Issues Facing Education
  • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching (one semester)
  • EDS4199  Internship Teacher Preparation (one semester)

Students must pass appropriate content PACT exam to be admitted to the Educator Certification Program prior to completion of the 26th credit hours of MA in Teaching coursework.

Master of Arts in Teaching in Special Education

Non-thesis degree program in special education for those seeking teaching certification.

(36 hours)

  • EDU5303  Integrating Educational Technology
  • EDU5304  Curriculum and Instruction Design
  • EDU5310  Elementary School Math and Science
  • EDU5311  Elementary School Language Arts and Social Studies
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5313  Classroom Management
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Leader
  • EDU5329  Content Area Literacy
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU6062  Comprehensive Examination

The following 13 hours must be completed for a Texas teaching certification:

  • EDU5199  Writing/Research in Graduate Education
  • REA3330  Literacy and the Young Child
  • REA3340  The Reading/Writing Connection
  • ESP4660  Clinical Teaching

Students must pass the appropriate content TExES exam prior to enrolling in ESP 4660.

Certification Only Programs

Students seeking admission into the certification programs must meet the general admission requirements for graduate admission. These programs meet the requirements for certification in the state of Texas.  Students interested in seeking certification in states other than Texas should notify the Director of Certification in the School of Education for more information.

Special Education Certification CORE

Certification only post-baccalaureate program in special education for those holding Texas teaching certification.

(15 hours)

  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs

Educational Diagnostics Certification

Certification only post-graduate program in diagnostics for those holding Texas teaching certification with three years of creditable teaching experience.

(24 hours)

  • EDU5340  Achievement Testing/Authentic Assessment
  • EDU5342  Intelligence Testing/Authentic Assessment
  • EDU5343  Cross-Battery Assessment for Learning Disabilities
  • EDU5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5347  Assessing the Special Needs Student
  • EDU5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
  • EDU5360  Seminar/Practicum for the Educational Diagnostician

Secondary Education Certification (Teacher Prep)

Certification only post-baccalaureate program in secondary education for those possessing at least 24 hours in a teaching field with 12 upper level hours.

(25 hours)

  • EDU5199  Writing/Research in Graduate Education
  • EDU5304  Curriculum and Instructional Design
  • EDU5312  Exceptionality
  • EDU5313  Classroom Management
  • EDU5316  Ethics for the Educator
  • EDU5317  Assessment and Evaluation
  • EDU5329  Content Area Literacy
  • EDS4660  Clinical Teaching

Students must pass appropriate content PACT exam to be admitted to the Educator Certification Program by completion of 9 hours of coursework.

Principal Certification

Program leading to the Principal Certification for those holding a master's degree and two years of creditable teaching experience.

(24 hours)

  • EDU5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership
  • EDU5320  Educational Law
  • EDU5324  Administration of Special Programs
  • EDU5326  The Principalship
  • EDU5331  Business and Personnel Management
  • EDU5333  School and Community Leadership
  • EDU5353  Principal Practicum I
  • EDU5356  Principal Practicum II

Superintendent Certification

Program leading to the Superintendent Certification for those holding a master's degree and meet other requirements established by the State Board of Education.

(15 hours)

  • EDU6101  Superintendency Practicum A
  • EDU6102  Superintendency Practicum B
  • EDU6103  Superintendency Practicum C
  • EDU6301  School Finance
  • EDU6302  School District Policy and Politics
  • EDU6303  School District Evaluation
  • EDU6304  The Superintendency

Graduate Exercise and Sport Sciences

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  • Chris Huggins, PT, DPT, ScD, Chair
  • Monica Williams, Ph.D.
  • Brandon Rix, PT, DPT
  • Toby Rogers, Ph.D., Dean of the B. Ward Lane College of Professional Studies

Degree

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Admission to the MS in Human Performance Program

See Graduate Admissions, including additional Program Admissions Requirements, section of university catalog.

Master of Science in Human Performance

The master of Science in Human Performance is an advanced degree in Exercise and Sport Sciences designed for students interested in pursuing advanced study in kinesiology, exercise science, motor performance, and strength and conditioning.  The program requires 30 credit hours for the non-thesis option and 36 credit hours for the thesis option.  This program is intended for students who have completed a bachelor’s degree and are interested in pursuing careers in the field of strength and conditioning, exercise physiology, fitness and wellness, and athletic coaching as well as pursuing doctoral studies in related fields.  The program instruction will be delivered via online or hybrid format with limited contact sessions required throughout the program.

(30 hours, Thesis option 36 hours)

  1. Major (30 hours)
    • ESS5301  Research Methods and Design in Human Performance
    • ESS5302  Statistical Analysis in Human Performance
    • ESS6303  Applied Sport and Performance Psychology
    • ESS6304  Performance Nutrition in Sport and Exercise
    • ESS6305  Applied Motor Control and Learning
    • ESS6306  Applied Professional Experience
    • ESS6401  Advanced Kinetic Anatomy and Biomechanics
    • ESS6001  Advanced Kinetic Anatomy and Biomechanics Lab
    • ESS6402  Advanced Strength and Conditioning
    • ESS6002  Advanced Strength and Conditioning Lab
    • ESS6403  Advanced Exercise Physiology
    • ESS6003  Advanced Exercise Physiology Lab
    • ESS6000  Comprehensive Examination (taken in the last semester)
  2. Thesis option (6 hours)
    • ESS6201  Thesis I Thesis Design
    • ESS6202  Thesis II Thesis Execution
    • ESS6203  Thesis III Thesis Presentation

Graduate Nursing

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Faculty

  • LaNell Harrison, Ph.D., RN, Chair
  • Dan Hatch, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, Coordinator of FNP Program, Director of Graduate Nursing
  • Beverly Byers, Ed.D., RN
  • JoAnn D. Long, Ph.D., RN, NEA-BC

Degree

To earn a degree, students must complete the curriculum and meet other requirements for a degree listed in the academic policy section of this catalog.

Admission to the MSN Program

  • See Graduate Admissions, including additional Program Admissions Requirements, section of university catalog.

Enrollment Requirements

  • Student liability insurance is purchased by the Department of Nursing at group rates. A fee is assessed to cover the cost.
  • Criminal background checks are required prior to enrollment. Information is available in the Department of Nursing office.
  • Students need a current passport for enrollment in NUR 5306/5308 Global and Cultural Health I and II.

Professional Portfolio

Candidates for the MSN will develop a professional portfolio over the course of the program. Criteria for development of the portfolio are presented in the Introduction to Graduate Studies Course taken the first semester of enrollment. The concepts and purposes of the portfolio will be developed further in subsequent classes and are part of the capstone course. The portfolio enables students, in a formal setting, to present a synthesis of their graduate course work to the faculty, especially emphasizing how they have integrated its advanced concepts into their professional behavior as nursing educators and leaders and as family nurse practitioners. The portfolio is presented in the final semester of required coursework. Satisfactory portfolio development and presentation is required for successful completion of the MSN program.

Master of Science in Nursing

The Master of Science in Nursing is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). The program is designed to equip the learner with the knowledge, skills, and values identified in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Masters Education for Advanced Practice Nursing. The AACN essentials provide a foundation for the graduate curriculum. The Master of Science in Nursing has two tracks; Education/Leadership Track and Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Track. Each track has its own admission requirements and curriculum.

Master of Science in Nursing—Education/Leadership Track

The Master of Science in Nursing—Education/Leadership Track requires 35 hours. The ANA professional nursing standards domains of practice for the role of nurse educator (nursing professional development), nurse leader (nursing administrator), and National League for Nursing Core Competencies of Nurse Educators are discussed within the program curriculum. Graduates who meet work experience and continuing education requirements are prepared for optional national certification as a nurse educator (staff development focus), or nurse executive through the American Nursing Credentialing Commission or the National League for Nursing (academic nurse educator certification). The program is designed to accommodate the registered nurse who is working full-time. It employs a combination of innovative methods to deliver the curriculum offered within a traditional semester. The majority of classes will use a short-course format meeting three to four days per semester supplemented with online instruction. Graduates from the program will be qualified to find employment in a variety of nursing education and leadership positions in hospital and community based health care organizations.

Education/Leadership Track Curriculum (35 hours)

  • NUR5200  Introduction to Graduate Studies
  • NUR5301  Education: Theories in Teaching and Learning
  • NUR5302  Research and Statistical Methods
  • NUR5303  Education and Information Technology Applications
  • NUR5304  Management of Health Care Resources
  • NUR5305  Nursing Theory
  • NUR5306  Global Culture and Health I
  • NUR5307  Applying Best Practices in Community Health Care
  • NUR5309  Leadership and Management Skills
  • NUR5310  Education/Leadership Capstone Practicum
  • NUR5311  Professional Issues: Law and Ethics
  • 3 hours from
    • NUR5308  Global Culture and Health II
    • NUR5312  Pathophysiology
    • NUR5313  Pharmacotherapeutics
    • NUR5315  Global Culture and Health III
    • NUR5316  Global Culture and Health IV
    • NUR5399  Independent Study

Master of Science in Nursing—Family Nurse Practitioner Track

The Master of Science in Nursing—Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Track requires 46 hours. The MSN—FNP Track is designed to prepare graduates to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) board certification exams to assume a primary care role in a clinical setting. Admission to the cohort-based program is limited. Applications are accepted beginning August 1 and close January 15 and the program begins each May. The program uses a combination of traditional and hybrid instructional delivery methods with a substantial amount of time in lectures, labs, and clinical experiences.

FNP Track Curriculum (46 hours)

  • NUR5102  Clinical Anatomy for the FNP
  • NUR5200  Introduction to Graduate Studies
  • NUR5202  Family Nursing Practitioner Role, Leadership, and Theory
  • NUR5244  Advanced Nursing Care: Women/Prenatal
  • NUR5302  Research and Statistical Methods
  • NUR5311  Professional Issues: Law and Ethics
  • NUR5312  Advanced Physiology/Pathophysiology
  • NUR5313  Pharmacotherapeutics
  • NUR5314  Advanced Diagnostics and Procedures
  • NUR5338  Advanced Nursing Care: Pediatrics
  • NUR5341  Advanced Nursing Care: Adult/Geriatrics
  • NUR5440  Primary Care Practicum I
  • NUR5434  Advanced Health Assessment
  • NUR5443  Primary Care Practicum II
  • NUR5445  Primary Care Practicum III
  • NUR6200  Evidence-Based Project

Post-MSN Certificate—Family Nurse Practitioner Track

The Post-MSN Certificate—Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Track requires 38 hours. The Post-MSN Certificate—FNP Track is designed to prepare nurses with the MSN to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) board certification exams to assume a primary care role in a clinical setting. Students in the Post-MSN Certificate—FNP Track, are not eligible for federal financial assistance. Admission to the program is limited. Applications are accepted beginning August 1 and close January 15. The program uses a combination of traditional and hybrid instructional delivery methods with a substantial amount of time in lectures, labs, and clinical experiences.

Post-MSN Certificate FNP Track Curriculum (38 hours)

  • NUR5313  Pharmacotherapeutics
  • NUR5312  Pathophysiology
  • NUR5102  Clinical Anatomy for the FNP
  • NUR5202  Family Nursing Practitioner Role, Leadership, and Theory
  • NUR5434  Advanced Health Assessment
  • NUR5314  Advanced Diagnostics and Procedures
  • NUR5338  Advanced Nursing Care: Pediatrics
  • NUR5440  Primary Care Practicum I
  • NUR5341  Advanced Nursing Care: Adult/Geriatrics
  • NUR5443  Primary Care Practicum II
  • NUR5244  Clinical Practicum: Women/Prenatal Primary Care
  • NUR5445  Primary Care Practicum III
  • NUR6200  Evidence-Based Capstone Project

Admission to the Post-MSN Clinical Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program

  • See Graduate Admissions, including additional Program Admissions Requirements section of university catalog.

Enrollment Requirements for the Post-MSN Clinical DNP

  • Student liability insurance is purchased by the Department of Nursing at group rates. A fee is assessed to cover the cost.
  • Criminal background checks are required prior to enrollment. Information is available in the Department of Nursing office.

Academic Requirements for the Post-MSN Clinical DNP

Maintaining Minimum Academic Requirements

The minimum GPA for continuance in the graduate program is 3.0 overall. Additionally, a minimum grade of “B” is required in each course (nursing required for degree completion.

Progression in the DNP Program

  • Grades are reviewed each semester and progression in the DNP Program is determined by the applicable DNP Dean/Department Chair and DNP Coordinator.
  • DNP students are required to maintain a 3.0 GPA with grades at “B” or above in all doctoral courses. Students with a cumulative or semester GPA below 3.0 are placed on academic probation.
  • Students receiving “C” or lower in a doctoral course are eligible to repeat the course one time only pursuant to recommendation of course faculty.
  • Students earning an overall cumulative GPA or a semester GPA less than a 3.0 in the semester of graduation/completion are ineligible for graduation/completion.

Academic Dismissal from the DNP Program will result from the following circumstances:

  • Students earning a “C” or lower in two or more DNP courses in one semester
  • Students earning a “C” or lower in the same DNP course twice
  • Students earning a “C” or lower in a second DNP course even though one DNP course has been retaken and a satisfactory grade of “B” or better has been obtained

Failing to meet expected standards in any program may result in academic dismissal at any time. 

Readmission to the DNP program

All requests for readmission must be made prior to the application deadline date for the semester in which readmission is requested. The Graduate Program Director and Program Coordinator and the university Graduate Appeals Committee are responsible for overseeing all readmissions to the DNP Program.

A student seeking readmission must comply with the following:

  • Submit a letter requesting readmission to the Grad Council
  • Meet all recommendations and requirements set forth by the Grad Council
  • Complete online application and meet admission criteria for full admission

DNP Scholarly Project

Candidates for the Post-MSN Clinical DNP will complete an evidence-based practice (EBP) scholarly project focused on quality improvement in healthcare. Criteria for development of the project are presented in the Introduction to DNP (NUR7100) taken the first semester of enrollment. The concepts and purposes of the project will be developed further in subsequent classes. In the development of the scholarly project, students will identify a specific problem impacting healthcare practice and utilize an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to understand the research focusing on the problem and potential responses, identify quality improvement measures, develop a plan for implementing the project, identify objectives and measures to be used to evaluate success, collect data, analyze results, disseminate findings, and provide further recommendations for practice The project is presented in the final semester of required coursework. Successful completion of the Post-MSN Clinical DNP program requires that candidates pass the DNP Scholarly Project.

DNP Clinical Hour Requirements for Post-Master’s DNP Students

All DNP students must complete a total of 1000 clinical hours/practice hours from a combination of clinical hours achieved in the master’s program and in the DNP program. Qualified advanced practice registered nurse applicants are expected to have successfully completed a minimum of 500 clinical hours in the student’s APRN master’s program in order to meet requirements for recognition or licensure and national certification, as appropriate, for the student’s professional role and practice area. The DNP post-master’s program provides a minimum of 500 clinical hours resulting in a minimum total of 1000 clinical hours for graduation.

Qualified applicants must provide evidence of the number of clinical hours/practice hours achieved in the student’s master’s program. To ensure students meet the required minimum 1000 clinical hours/practice hours, additional clinical learning opportunities are offered via one or more of the following methods:

  • Submission of a professional portfolio documenting clinical activities/practice hours and scholarship to meet the criteria for clinical hours for the DNP program. The portfolio may include a resume or CV and a description of the individual’s practice experience; academic and specialized programs of study in the student’s specialty area; certifications in administration; or additional activities, and experiences exemplifying competence in the student’s specialty area.
  • Students not meeting the clinical hour/ practice hour criteria will be evaluated and required to take an independent study course designed to provide an individualized clinical intensive based on the student’s background, experience, and learning needs to complete the required 1000 clinical hours/practice hours for the DNP degree.

Clinical experiences/practice hours for DNP post-master’s students are defined as direct or indirect patient care experiences; observational experiences; interviews; participation in community events or local, state, or national meetings relevant to the learning objectives; or other unique learning opportunities where the student can achieve defined learning objectives. Clinical experiences/practice hours may take place in the student’s place of employment if the experience clearly provides an opportunity to achieve specified student learning objectives. Students may work with professional mentors or preceptors during their clinical experiences. School of Nursing faculty may serve as preceptors or professional mentors.

Graduation Requirements for the Post-MSN Clinical DNP

It is the responsibility of students to know their academic plan and to register for and complete courses that fulfill the academic plans. Degrees will be awarded only when students satisfactorily complete the conditions of their academic plans and meet all other requirements for earning a degree. In the Post-MSN Clinical Doctor of Nursing Program students are required to successfully pass their DNP Scholarly Project in order to be eligible for graduation.

Students must complete the application for graduation when registering for their last semester. Students have one year from the intended graduation date to complete the requirements. Students needing longer periods of time must secure dean approval.

Post-MSN Clinical Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

The Post-MSN Clinical Doctor of Nursing Practice is a terminal practice degree in advanced nursing and requires 36 credit hours and 500 clinical hours (the program will accept up to 500 clinical hours obtained in previous clinical master’s program) for a total of 1000 clinical hours upon graduation. This program is designed for the advanced practice registered nurse who already has a Master of Science in Nursing Degree and is certified in a specific clinical practice role such as nurse practitioner, nurse anesthesia, nurse midwife, or clinical nurse specialist.  The program instruction will be delivered via online format. 

Post-MSN Clinical DNP Curriculum (36 hours)

  • NUR7100  Intro to DNP
  • NUR7201  Professional/Independent Practice
  • NUR7302  Business of Healthcare Practice
  • NUR7303  Cultural Disparity in Healthcare
  • NUR7304  Population Health/Epidemiology (100 clinical hours)
  • NUR7305  Evidence-based Practice/Translational Science
  • NUR7306  Healthcare Technologies and Emerging Therapies
  • NUR7307  DNP Scholarly Project I (40 clinical hours)
  • NUR7308  Specialization in Clinical Practice (120 clinical hours)
  • NUR7309  Quality and Safety in Healthcare
  • NUR7310  DNP Scholarly Project II (120 clinical hours)
  • NUR7311  Interprofessional Collaboration
  • NUR7312  DNP Scholarly Project III (120 clinical hours)

Personnel

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Board of Trustees

Terry Creech, Chair, Midland, Texas

George Lamberth, Vice Chair, Colleyville, Texas

Tony Peña, Secretary, Lubbock, Texas

Tia Clary, Treasurer, Idalou, Texas

Neil Baldridge, Lubbock, Texas

Marcelino Banda, Lubbock, Texas

Tom Basye, Lubbock, Texas

DeeDee Bundy, Lubbock, Texas

Mike Bustillos, Garland, Texas

Jim Cardwell, El Paso, Texas

Steve Crockett, Lubbock, Texas

Linda Gaither, Lubbock, Texas

Albert Gillispie, Lubbock, Texas

Larry Hays, Lakewood, Colorado

Lowell Johnson, Lubbock, Texas

Patti Patterson Joiner, Lubbock, Texas

B. Ward Lane, Santa Anna, Texas

Tim Leslie, Lubbock, Texas

Quentin Mimms, Fairview, Texas

Steve McCleery, Lubbock, Texas

DeLena McEwen, The Woodlands, Texas

Alan Rhodes, Amarillo, Texas

Rhonda Rhodes, Denver, Colorado

Melisa Roberts, Lubbock, Texas

Al Smith, Amarillo, Texas

Kenneth Stephenson, Lubbock, Texas

David Stewart, Grants, New Mexico

Denise Turner, Abernathy, Texas

Sharyn Webb, North Richland Hills, Texas

Rob Wilkinson, Shallowater, Texas

Mike Wischkaemper, Lubbock, Texas

Administration

President --
Scott McDowell (2020) B.A. Freed-Hardeman University, M.A.R. Lipscomb University, Ed.D., Azusa Pacific University.

Provost and Chief Academic Officer --
Kent Gallaher (2022) B.S, Libscomb University, M.S., Ph.D. The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Chief Financial Officer –
Tim Miller (2023) B.A., Freed-Hardeman University

Vice President for Technology --
Karl Mahan, (2007), B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.S. Eastern New Mexico University, Ed.D. Texas Tech University.

Vice President for University Advancement --
Raymond Richardson (2014) B.B.A. Sul Ross State University, M.S.L. Lubbock Christian University.

Vice President for University Relations --
Warren McNeill (2004) B.S., M.S., Lubbock Christian University.

Vice President for Student Life --
Randal Dement (2007) B.S., M.A.L. Lubbock Christian University

Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness --
Yvonne Harwood (2019) B.A., M.A., Texas Tech University

Assistant Vice President for Financial Assistance --
Becky Wilson (2017) B.A. Lubbock Christian University

Assistant Vice President for Human Resources --
Brenda Lowe (1999)

Controller --
Brandon Goen (2016) B.S. Lubbock Christian University

Academic Administration

Provost and Chief Academic Officer --
Kent Gallaher, B.S, Libscomb University, M.S., Ph.D. The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Associate Provost for Academic Affairs –-
Kenneth Hawley, B.A, University of Houston, M.A., Texas Tech University, Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Dean of the Honors College Hancock College of Liberal Arts --
Stacy Patty, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.Div. Harding University, S.T.M. Union Theological Seminary, Ph.D. Baylor University.

Dean of the School of Education --
David Boyer, B.A, Lubbock Christian University, M.Ed., Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Dean of the Alfred and Patricia Smith College of Biblical Studies --
Jeff Cary,  B.A., Lubbock Christian University, MS. Abilene Christian University, M.Div., Harding University, Ph.D. Baylor University.

Dean of the B. Ward Lane College of Professional Studies --
Toby Rogers, B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.S. Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Ph.D. Texas Tech University.

Dean of the School of Business --
Tracy Mack, B.B.A. Abilene Christian University, M.B.A., Texas A&M University

Director of the Center for Teaching, Learning and Scholarship; Director of Quality Enhancement Plan--
Cathy Box, B.S. M.S., Ph.D. Texas Tech University.

Full-Time Faculty

Craig Allen (2022), Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, B.A. Abilene Christian University, M.S. Grand Canyon University

Jana Anderson (2005) Assistant Professor of English, Director of the Writing Center, B.S.Ed. Abilene Christian University, M.A., Abilene Christian University.

Sam Ayers, (2014) Professor of Education, B.A,. Trinity University, M.Ed., Trinity University, Ed.D. Texas Tech University.

Vanessa Bolyard (2015) Assistant Professor of Nursing, B.S.N. Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, M.S.N., West Texas A&M University, D.N.P., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

Tonia Boyer (2011) Instructor of Education, B.S.I.S. M.Ed., Lubbock Christian Universit

Connor Bryant (2023) Assistant Professor of Education, B.S.I.S., M.Ed. Lubbock Christian Universit

Haley Burton (2020), Instructor of Business, B.B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.S. West Texas A & M University

Matt Byars, (2008) Associate Professor of English, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.A. Texas Tech University, Ph.D., Georgia State University.

Tim Byars (2000) Associate Professor of Government, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, J.D., Texas Tech University.

Beverly K. Byers (1982) Professor of Nursing, B.S.N., West Texas A&M, M.S., Texas Tech University, M.S.N., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Philip Camp (1996) Professor of Music, B.M.Ed. Abilene Christian University, M.M., Arizona State University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Carole Logan Carroll (2000) Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Ashley Cherry (2016) Associate Professor of Mathematics, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Dawn Cox (2023) Assistant Professor of Education, B.S. Texas Tech University, M.Ed. Lamar University

Jennifer M. Dabbs (2001) Professor of Sociology, B.A. Centenary College of Louisiana, M.A., University of Pittsburgh, Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Russell E. Dabbs (2001) Professor of Economics, B.A. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, M.S., University of North Texas, Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Doug Darby (2018) Associate Professor of Business, B.S., M.S. Abilene Christian University, Ph.D. University of North Texas

Terry Delaney (2014) Associate Professor of Nursing, ,B.S. Texas Tech University Health Science Center M.S.N., Lubbock Christian University, D.N.P., American Sentinel University

Laurie L. Doyle (1982) Professor of Music, Chair of Department of Communication and Fine Arts, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.M., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Bart Durham (2007) Professor of Ecology and Conservation Biology, B.S, Oklahoma State University, M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Joshuah Ellis (2022), Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences, B.Arts & Sciences, Midwestern State University, M.S. Angelo State University

Kregg Fehr (2000) Professor of History, B.S., M.A., Midwestern State University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Brian Fisher (2014) Professor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

David Fraze (2018, 2001-2007) Associate Professor of Youth Ministry, James A. “Buddy” Davidson Endowed Chair in Youth and Family Ministry, B.A., Lubbock Christian University, M.Div., Abilene Christian University, D.Min. Fuller Theological Seminary

Brandon L. Fredenburg (2000) Professor of Biblical Studies, Chair of Academic Affairs for Department of Biblical Studies and the Graduate School of Theology, B.A., David Lipscomb University, M.Div., Beeson Divinity School of Samford University, Ph.D., University of Denver and The Iliff School of Theology

Shauna Frisbie (2001) Professor of Counseling, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Caren Fullerton (2004) Associate Professor of Agriculture Economics and Business, B.S. Texas Tech University, M.S., Texas A&M University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Melanie Grelhesl (2018) Instructor of Communications, B.A. Angelo State University, M.A. Texas Tech University

LaNell Harrison (2002) Professor of Nursing, Director of RN/BSN and MSN Programs, A.D.N. South Plains College, B.S.N. Lubbock Christian University. M.S.N. West Texas A&M University, Ph.D., Texas Woman’s University.

Daniel Hatch (2013) Associate Professor of Nursing, Coordinator of FNP Program, B.S.N., M.S.N., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, D.N.P., Texas Christian University.

Kenneth Hawley (2004) Professor of English, B.A, University of Houston, M.A., Texas Tech University, Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Jeremy Hegi (2019) Assistant Professor of the History of Christianity, B.S, Texas A & M University, M.A. Abilene Christian University, Ph.D. Boston University

Ronelle Howell (2018) Assistant Professor of Art, B.A, Lubbock Christian University, M.F.A, Texas Tech University, M.Ed., Lubbock Christian University.

Chris Huggins (2015), Associate Professor of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Chair of Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, B.A., Lubbock Christian University, D.PT., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, ScD., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

Jerry Jerabek (2021) Assistant Professor of Education, B.S., Lubbock Christian University, M.A., National University

Jill Johnson (2001) Professor of Social Work, Chair of Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice, B.S.W, Lubbock Christian University, M.S.S.W., University of Texas at Arlington, Ph.D. University of Texas at Arlington.

Rachel Keylon (2021) Instructor of Natural Sciences, B.S., Oklahoma Panhandle State University, M.S., Texas Tech University

Andy Laughlin (2005) Professor of Animal Science and Biology, Chair of Department of Natural Sciences, B.S., M.S., Angelo State University, Ph.D. Texas A&M University.

Gary Lindsey (2019) Professor of History, B.Arch. Texas Tech University, M.A. Abilene Christian University, Ph.D. Texas Tech University

Jesse C. Long, Jr. (1993) Professor of Old Testament and Archeology, B.A, David Lipscomb University, M.A., Alabama Christian, M.Ed., Georgia State University, M.Phil., M.A., Ph.D., Drew University.

JoAnn Long (1993) Professor of Nursing, Director of Research and Development in Nursing, A.D.N., B.S.N., Georgia State University, M.S.N., Troy State University, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

Annette Mahan (1991) Assistant Professor of Education, B.S. Ed. Lubbock Christian University, M.Ed.Ad., Eastern New Mexico University, M.Ed., Texas Tech University.

Julie Marshall (1998) Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Michael Martin (2004) Professor of New Testament, B.A., M.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary, Ph.D., Baylor University.

Abraham Mata (2012) Associate Professor of Spanish, B.A., M.Sc.c., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Kim McCullough (2010) Assistant Professor of Exercise and Sport Sciences, B.S., M.S., Texas Tech University.

Amy Miles (2023) Assistant Professor of English, B.A, Howard Payne University, M.A., Hardin-Simmons University.

Keith Owen (1994) Professor of History, B.A. Lubbock Christian College, M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Olga Pahom (2018) Associate Dean of Honors College, Associate Professor of Linguistics and Cultural Studies, Honors College, B.A., B.B.A., Lubbock Christian University, M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University

Tony Parnell (1993) Associate Professor of Social Work, B.S, Freed-Hardeman University, M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee.

Carlos Perez (2012) Associate Professor of Behavioral Science, Chair of Behavioral Science Department, B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.M.F.T., Abilene Christian University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Ronna Privett (1999) Professor of English, Chair of Department of Humanities, B. A., Lubbock Christian University, M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Shannon Rains (2016) Associate Professor of Children's Ministry, B.S., M.S., D. Min., Abilene Christian University.

Karissa Ramos (2021) Assistant Professor of Education, B.S., M.Ed., Lubbock Christian University

Laci Richardson (2017) Assistant Professor of Accounting, B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Northcentral University

Nathan Richardson (2021) Instructor in Digital Media, B.A., Lubbock Christian University, M.S., Arizona State Universit

Byron Rogers (1986) Professor of Chemistry, B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.M.C. Texas Tech University, Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Jessica Rogers (2011) Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B.S, Lubbock Christian University, M.S., Lehigh University.

Keith Rogers (1993) Professor of Mathematics, Chair of Department of Mathematics, B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.S., University of North Texas, Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Joshua Sauerwein (2020) Associate Professor of Business B.A., Tabor College, M.B.A. Emporia State University, D.B.A., Anderson University

Gene Sheets (2015) Associate Professor of Education, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Abilene Christian University, Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Ann Sims (2001) Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S.Ed. Abilene Christian University, M.A., Texas Tech University.

Mark Sneed (1999) Professor of Old Testament, B.A, David Lipscomb University, M.A., Harding Graduate School of Religion, Ph.D., Drew University.

Doug Swartz (2015), Associate Professor of Natural Sciences, B.S. Oklahoma State University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

Mark Wiebe (2013)Associate Professor of Theology and Church History, B.A., M.Div., Abilene Christian University, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University.

Mark Wilkinson (2014) Associate Professor of Nursing, B.S. Southern Christian University, M.S.N., Lubbock Christian University, D.N.P., Samford University.

Monica Williams (2017) Associate Professor of Exercise and Sport Sciences, B.A., M.S., Texas Tech University, M.B.A., University of Phoenix, PhD., Grand Canyon University

Macy Williamson (2021) Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences, B.S. Texas Tech University, M.Ed. Texas Tech University, Ph.D. Texas Tech University

Scott Young (2008) Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S. Texas Tech University, M.S., San Diego State University.

Part-Time Faculty

Matt Bumstead, School of Business CEO in Residence, B.A. Davidson College, M.B.A Texas Tech University.

Judith Flagle (2015) Lecturer in Residence of Education, B.S., M.S., Colorado State University, Ed.D., Texas Tech University.

Emily Howard (2021) Lecturer in Residence of Microbiology, B.S. Lubbock Christian University, M.S. University of Florida.

Michelle Kraft (1994) Lecturer in Residence of Art, B.S., B.A. Lubbock Christian University, M.A., West Texas A&M University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Melanie McGilton (2018) Lecturer in Residence of Chemistry, B.S. Oklahoma Christian University, Ph.D. New Mexico Tech.

Lisa Tatum (2022), Visiting Assistant Professor of Music, B.S. University of Alabama, M.M. University of Utah, M.M. Louisiana State University, D.M.A. Texas Tech University.

Shawn Tyler (2012) Lecturer in Residence of Missions, B.S., M.S., Abilene Christian University.

Librarians

Amanda Weir-Guthrie (2020) Director, B.S. College of the Southwest, M.L.S., University of North Texas

Katherine Anderson, (2018) Electronic Resources Librarian, B.A, Lubbock Christian University, M.S. University of North Texas.

Kate Spence (2021) Access Services Librarian, B.A., Lubbock Christian University, M.S., University of North Texas.

Coaches

Scott Larson (2019) Athletic Director, B.S., University of Tulsa, M.B.A. Arizona State University

Gary Belt (2011) Men's and Women's Golf, B.S., M.B.A. Amberton University

Nathan Blackwood (2003) Baseball, B.S. Ed. Lubbock Christian University, M.Ed. Harding University

Leigh Cordes (2018) Women's Cross Country and Track, B.S., Texas Tech University

Nick Cordes (2014) Men's Cross Country and Track, B.S., Ashland University

Alex Denning (2011) Women's Soccer, B.A., Ouachita Baptist University, M.S. Lubbock Christian University

Todd Duncan (2011) Men’s Basketball, B.S., Texas Tech University

Steve Gomez (2003) Women’s Basketball, B.A., Lubbock Christian University

Daren Hays (2010) Softball, B.S.E., Lubbock Christian University

Keith Giboney (2021) Volleyball, B.S. Education, Lubbock Christian University, M.S. Health Education, Texas A&M Commerce

Jason Speegle (2021) Men’s and Women’s Tennis, B.A. Physics Southwestern College, M.S. Leadership Southwestern College

Course Descriptions and Symbols

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Course Numbering

A four-digit number identifies each course. The following shows the meaning of each digit for the course number:

For Example: 1302.

  • First digit–class level
  • Second digit–number of credits

Last two digits–sequence in department offerings. Final digit may indicate the semester the course is offered. Spring semester courses end in even numbers and fall courses in odd numbers. The letters F (fall), S (spring), or SU (summer) at the end of each course description indicates the semester the course will be offered. Term suffixes, such as O or E indicate odd or even numbered years. Departments may offer courses not listed in the catalog. Such courses are labeled special topics (52 suffix), undergraduate research (88 suffix), and in writings and research (99 suffix).

Lower level courses

  • 1000–freshman
  • 2000–sophomore
  • Upper level courses
  • 3000–junior
  • 4000–senior

Graduate courses

  • 5000–6000

Symbols

  • B–Offered both fall and spring each year
  • CO–Corequisite
  • D–Offered upon sufficient demand
  • E–Offered every other year on even numbered years
  • F–Offered each fall semester
  • H–Honors Only
  • M–Majors Only
  • O–Offered every other year on odd numbered years
  • PF–Pass/Fail
  • PRE–Prerequisite
  • S–Offered each spring semester
  • SU–Offered each summer semester
  • Y–Offered year round
  • (3:1) Lecture hours per week: Lab hours per week

(ACC) Accounting

2301  Principles of Financial Accounting. Identifying, analyzing, measuring, and recording financial information. Preparing and understanding financial statements. F

2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting. Continuation of ACC2301. Analyzing financial statement accounts and communicating results. PRE: ACC 2301. S

3301  Intermediate Accounting I. Accounting environment; accounting process; financial statements; analysis of asset and liability elements. PRE: ACC 2302. F

3302  Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of 3301. Analysis of stockholder equity elements; error and financial statement analysis. PRE: ACC 3301. S

3303  Cost Accounting. Cost concepts, behavior, and accounting techniques. Cost determination and decision making are emphasized. PRE: ACC 2302. F

3305  Special Problems in Accounting. Complex accounting applications. PRE: ACC 3302. F

3320  Business Ethics for Accountants. Examines various theories of ethics, stressing Christian ethics in an accounting context. PRE: ACC 2302. S

4305  Income Tax I. Study of federal income tax laws as they affect individuals. Emphasis on application of income tax theory. PRE: ACC 2302. F

4308  Auditing. Auditing concepts, standards, and objectives; auditing procedures; sampling techniques; internal control evaluation; the audit report. PRE: ACC 3301. S

4310  Accounting Systems. Theories, techniques, and procedures of accounting information systems for organizations. PRE: ACC 2302. F

4315  Financial Statement Analysis. Advanced study of financial topics specifically related to financial statements used primarily for making decisions to invest in business. Includes analysis of financial statements focusing on ratio, comparative and trend analysis, certain valuation concepts, and company comparisons. PRE: FIN 3300. D

4330  Internship. Work in an area of business utilizing skills developed in the accounting program. PRE: Minimum of 12 upper level hours in accounting and approval of the instructor. B

5002  Advanced Accounting and Theory Lab.  CPA Exam review lab to be taken concurrently with ACC5402.  Fee $2000. (Fee will be assessed one time for either ACC5002 or ACC5006, but not for both.) F

5006  Advanced Income Tax Lab.   CPA Exam review lab to be taken concurrently with ACC5406.  Fee $2000. (Fee will be assessed one time for either ACC5002 or ACC5006, but not for both.) S

5315   Financial Statement Analysis. Advanced study of financial topics to learn how to use financial statements as part of an overall assessment of a company’s strategy and valuation. Includes analysis of financial statements focusing on ratio, comparative and trend analysis, certain valuation concepts, and company comparisons. B

5401  Accounting and Tax Research. Accounting and tax research using professional and scholarly literature. F

5402  Advanced Accounting and Theory. A study of the accounting and reporting problems associated with consolidated financial statements, partnerships, and issues related to selected entities or types of ownership, along with a study of contemporary issues in accounting theory. F

5404  Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. A study of the accounting methods for state and local governments, universities, hospitals, and nonprofit organizations. F

5405  Fraud Auditing and Forensic Accounting. A study of fraud, including risk factors, prevention techniques, characteristics of common schemes, fraud detection processes and tools, and the use of accounting, auditing, and other procedures in fraud investigation and resolution. Case study techniques are used in this course. S

5406  Advanced Income Tax. The study of the taxation of corporations, partnerships, trusts, estates, and gifts. S

5408  Accounting Analytics. A study of data analysis in accounting, including preparing data, dealing with errors and anomalies, and visualizing data. S

(AEC) Agriculture Economics

3304  Farm and Ranch Management. Economic and business principles applied for more profitable operation. D

3312  Natural Resources Economics. Integrated study of economic impacts of natural resources and private or political decisions that affect their uses. Focuses on local and regional case studies. Study of classical issues related to renewable and non-renewable resources as well as conservation and public policy concerns. SE

3315  Agricultural Policy. Governmental policy relative to farm programs, resource conservation, foreign trade, and rural development. FO

4314  Agriculture Finance and Credit. Principles of agricultural finance emphasizing cost and return from use of capital and credit, types and sources of credit and role of agricultural lending institutions. PRE: AEC 2303. FO

(AES) Aerospace Studies

1105  Foundations of the United States Air Force I. Survey course that deals with the mission, organization, and function of the American military, especially as it applies to the United States Air Force.

1106  Foundations of the United States Air Force II. Survey course that deals with the Air Force in the contemporary world through a study of the total force structure, strategic offensive and defensive forces, general purpose forces and aerospace support forces.

2103, 2104  The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I and II. Survey course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Historical examples are provided to analyze the development of the Air Force capabilities and missions as well as to demonstrate the evolution of today’s air and space power. Students also focus on basic verbal and written communication skills and USAF core values.

3305  Air Force Leadership Studies I. Introductory management course emphasizing the individual as a manager in the Air Force. Individual motivation and behavioral processes, leadership, communication, and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for the development of the junior officer’s professional skills as an Air Force leader. PRE: Acceptance into Professional Officer Course.

3306  Air Force Leadership Studies II. Leadership theory and management practice are amplified through study of management of forces in change, organizational power, managerial strategy and tactics, and leadership ethics. PRE: Acceptance into Professional Officer Course.

4303, 4304  National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I and II. Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to the refinement of communication skills. PRE: Acceptance into Professional Officer Course.

(AFA) Fine Arts

2350  Introduction to Fine Arts. Interdisciplinary course designed to introduce the student to basic elements of art, music, and theatre. Taught as a team effort by the music, theatre, and art areas. F

(AGR) Agriculture

1304  Principles of Soil Science. Study of the nature and properties of soils, including classification, physical properties, ecology of the soil, soil fertility, and soil conservation principles and practices. SE

(ANS) Animal Science

1003  Animal Sciences Lab. Fee $75. CO: ANS1303. F

1303  Principles of Animal Science. Study of the modern field of animal agriculture. Emphasis on breeding, feeding, management, and marketing. (2:3) CO: ANS1003 F

3303  Feeds and Feeding. Study of the principles of animal nutrition with an emphasis on feeding food animal species. Covers livestock nutritional requirements, protein and energy rations, the importance of micro and macro nutrients for livestock, nutritional diseases, and recent discoveries in nutritional research. Economy in feeding is emphasized. PRE: CHE 2402 or concurrent enrollment. FO

3314  Physiology of Farm Animals. Study of the physiological systems of animals including growth and development. S

3323  Physiology of Reproduction. Study of the reproductive processes in domestic animals with emphasis on male and female anatomy, endocrinology, estrous cycles, and fertilization. F

3403  Advanced Feeds and Nutrition. Chemical composition of foodstuffs; digestion, absorption, metabolism of nutrients and calculation of rations. S

4313  Concepts in Animal Health and Disease. Detailed study of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of diseases on domestic and wild animals. Major emphasis is placed on identification of risk factors, prevention, transmission, immunity and resistance, and pathogenesis of emerging and economically important animal diseases. SE

4324  Advanced Animal Nutrition. Biochemical and physiological bases for nutritional requirements of domestic animals. PRE: ANS 3403. SE

4330  Animal Science Practicum. Opportunity to visit selected livestock operations in the southwest. PRE: Junior standing and advisor approval. Travel fees. D

(ART) Art

1303  Drawing I. Introductory studio course in drawing with attention to black and white media. Attention to development of self-expressive communication and composition in drawing through the use of line, texture, value, space and perspective. F

1304  Drawing II. Further development of self-expressive communication and composition through drawing with emphasis on color media. PRE: 1303 S

1305  Two-Dimensional Design. Introduction to the role of formalist design in art and visual media, with emphasis on two dimensional works. Studio activities explore elements and principles of design and composition. B

2000  Portfolio Review in Art. Faculty review of professional standards portfolio presentation for students in Bachelor of Fine Arts program. Students will be mentored in abilities, future academic plans, career interests, and provided direction and focus prior to continuing to upper level courses. Course required for Art majors upon completion of 15 hours of Art and/or Digital Media Applications coursework. Should be taken prior to junior year. D

2306  Life Drawing. Studio-based introduction to drawing the human figure using a variety of black and white and color drawing media. Drawing of live models and other figurative resources. PRE: ART 1304. FO

2307  Survey of Art History I. Survey of art history from prehistory to the 14th Century. Outside research required. F

2308  Survey of Art History II. Survey of Western painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the 15th Century to the present. Outside research required. S

2310  Ceramics. Studio course in ceramics techniques, including hand-building and wheel-throwing approaches. Fee: $120. SO

2311  Typography. Exploration of typographic structures, terminology and methods as a tool for visual problem solving. This studio course uses both hands-on and computer methods to address the language of type and its effective usage in design. Study of the language of type, its history and application, and attainment of working knowledge of this essential element to graphic design. PRE: ART 1305. D

2312  Three-Dimensional Design. Studio experiences and discussion to develop the use of elements and principles of design, composition, and visual expression through three-dimensional forms. A lab fee may be collected for materials as needed. PRE: ART1305. SE

2316  Painting I. Introduction to painting that emphasizes visual self-expression/communication through basic techniques. PRE: ART1303 or 1305. S

3303  Curriculum and Assessment in K-12 Art. Studies issues related to curriculum in the K-12 art class, including national and state level standards for visual arts, children's development in art, scope and sequence in curriculum design, budget and art materials, inclusion of learners with special needs, professional standards, and development of course objectives and assessment. PRE: Junior Status. SO

3304  Painting II. Studio-based continuation of methods and concepts learned in Painting I, with water-media, including acrylic and watercolor. Continued development of perceptual awareness, rendering, composition, and creative problem solving through study that may include still-life, figure, landscape, and abstract/conceptual subjects. PRE: ART 2316. S

3305  History of Modern Art. Study of Western art history and theory from the late 19th century through the early 21st century, including developments in avant-garde Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Examines critical subtexts and cultural milieu that influenced the transformation of Modern art. Outside research required. Satisfies general core fine arts history requirement. PRE: Sophomore standing. S

3306  Art and Children. Studies and activities to promote creative art expression for children with an emphasis on current trends in art education. B

3309  Painting III. Studio course that builds on methods and concepts learned in Painting I and II, with a concentration in oil-based media. Continued development of perceptual awareness, rendering, composition, and creative problem solving through study that may include still-life, figure, landscape, and abstract/conceptual subjects. PRE: ART 2316. S

3310  Printmaking. Studio course in printmaking techniques with focus on stenciling and relief printing. Fee $100. FE

3326  Sculpture. Study of tools and materials related to creation of art in three dimensions. Survey of primary sculptural techniques of addition, subtraction, substitution, and manipulation. Fee $80 PRE: ART 2312. D

4302  History of Art in the United States. Native American art, art during Colonial period through contemporary American artists. Emphasizes religious, political, economic, racial and other cultural contexts as reflected in period art. Satisfies general core fine arts history requirement. PRE: Sophomore standing. F

4303  Professional Practice and Special Problems in Drawing. Advanced drawing course where students work individually and in groups toward concept and skill development in drawing. Students develop a singular theme for visual exploration, completing work in keeping with three credit hours of senior level studio work. Students learn professional practice of arts including portfolio development, photography of work, gallery installation standards, and professional development. PRE: Junior status and ART 1303, 1304, and 2306. D

4304  Professional Practice and Special Problems in Painting. Advanced painting course where students work individually and in groups toward concept and skill development in painting media. Students develop a singular theme for visual exploration, completing work in keeping with three credit hours of senior level studio work. Students learn professional practice of arts including portfolio development, photography of work, gallery installation standards, and professional development. PRE: Junior status and ART 2316 and ART 3304 or 3309. D

4305  Contemporary Issues in Art Education. Designed for all-level art education majors, studies contemporary issues relating to unique setting and practice of visual arts education in the K-12 classroom. Includes topics related to visual culture, including difference, arts education policy, art in public spaces, application of art theory to pedagogy, and professional development and practices. PRE: Junior status. SE

4311  Illustration: Traditional and Digital. A study of materials, techniques, processes, and ideas fundamental to the discipline of illustration, including digital drawing/painting, with special attention to creating selected works for editorials, posters, covers, and collateral materials. This course concentrates on producing and refining a body of work to augment student portfolios. PRE: ART2311, ART1304. S.

4313  Graphic Design Systems.  A study of integrated design using message, typography, and image through several platforms of communication in pursuit of visual continuity. Studio work emphasizes concept development to explore informative, narrative, and expressive design, and ethical promotion and marketing. Includes research, writing and presentation skills. PRE: ART 2311, DMA3341, DMA3342. D

4308  Art Theory and Criticism. Explorations in criticism and the theories that have shaped and/or responded to Modern and Post-modern art. Outside research required. S

4360  Senior Seminar. Independent or class study in selected area with departmental approval required. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis. D

(BIB) Bible

1310  Introduction to the Old Testament. Introduction to the Old Testament with careful attention given to God’s covenant relationship with Israel. B

1312  Introduction to the Old Testament for Majors. Introduction to the Old Testament for majors with careful attention given to God’s covenant relationship with Israel. F

1320  Introduction to the New Testament. Introduction to the New Testament with careful attention given to the life and teachings of Jesus. B

1322  Introduction to the New Testament for Majors. Introduction to the New Testament for majors with careful attention given to the life and teachings of Jesus. S

2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics. Study of the art of interpretation and implementation of a proper exegesis of a specific biblical text. Introduction to tools of biblical research. F

2310  Vocation and Life (H). Investigations into the nature of Christian living, with specific attention to an understanding of vocatio or calling. Integrates biblical and theological teaching regarding meaning and purpose, virtue and profession, with contemporary issues and topics. F

3300  Romans. Exegetical study of Paul’s epistle with significant attention to Paul’s theology and pastoral directives for the Roman church. A section is offered in the fall for majors only. F

3303  Old Testament Seminar (H). Examines Old Testament, with an emphasis on themes, history, literary structure, and sociology of biblical texts and periods. Specific courses may vary according to professor specialization or research interest. S

3305  Christian Heritage. Introduction to the historical and theological developments of the Christian church from the earliest days as recorded in the book of Acts to the present. B

3310  Christian Life. Integrate previous biblical studies instruction under praxis, textual studies, and service components. B

3312  The Nature of Scripture. Surveys the history of interpretive methods used in the study of scripture from pre-Christian Judaism through the present and explores ministerial and personal questions of faith that arise from a study of historical-critical methods, textual criticism, and canon formation. S

4060  Senior Presentation.  A supervised capstone course in which a student in or near his or her final semester makes an oral presentation that revises and extends an exegetical research project/paper previously or concurrently submitted in an upper level biblical text course.  This course, together with the Practicum, represents the culmination of coursework. B

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in student area of ministry, culminating in a final, written report. Recommended for summer completion with fall enrollment. F

6301  Introduction to the New Testament. Advanced introduction to the New Testament for exegetical and homiletic purposes with emphasis on the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text. D

6302  Hermeneutics. Study of the history of the application of hermeneutics to the biblical text with an emphasis on the current questions in biblical interpretation. D

6305  Studies in the New Testament Text. Critical study and analysis of a selected New Testament book or genres for exegesis. Students may take each book or genre only one time. D

6306  New Testament Theology. Study of the doctrinal teachings presented in the New Testament. D

6307  Preaching Biblical Genres. Application of varied preaching forms to a selected book or genres of the Bible. D

6308  Studies in the Old Testament Text. Critical study and analysis of a selected Old Testament book or genre for exegesis. Students may take each book or genre one time. D

6309  Social World of Christianity. Exploration into the environment in which Christianity arose and spread. The history, daily life, and institutions of the period will be examined in conjunction with relevant New Testament texts. D

6310 Introduction to the Old Testament. Advanced introduction to the Old Testament designed for exegesis and preaching with an emphasis on the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text. D

6313  Biblical Archaeology. Dynamics of the interplay of history, religion, and culture of the Near Middle East through an archaeological lens. Students encounter concepts of worldview, morality, religion, and culture. D

6314  Social Perspectives of the Old Testament. Exploration into the environment in which the Old Testament texts were written. The history, daily life, and institutions of the periods will be examined in conjunction with Old Testament texts. D

(BIH) Biblical History

6327  History of Christianity. Introduction to and survey of the history of Christianity, with an emphasis in the social, historical, and religious factors that influenced the formation of various groups and teachings. D

6329  American Church History. Survey of American church history focusing on the Restoration Movement, with an emphasis on the key personalities, teachings, and development of this period. D

(BIL) Biblical Languages

2311  Elementary Greek I. Elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. F

2322  Elementary Greek II. Further elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 2311. S

3313  Elementary Hebrew I. Elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. FD

3324  Elementary Hebrew II. Further elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 3313. SD

3331  Intermediate Greek I. Intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 2322. F

3342  Intermediate Greek II. Further intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 3331. S

4336  Intermediate Hebrew I. Intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 3324. FD

4345  Intermediate Hebrew II. Further intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 4336. SD

4351  Advanced Greek I. Advanced study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 3342. FD

4357  Advanced Hebrew I. Advanced study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 4345. D

4362  Advanced Greek II. Exegesis, with attention to advanced grammar, semantics, and textual criticism. PRE: BIL 4351. SD

4367  Advanced Hebrew II. Exegesis, with attention to advanced grammar, Hebrew poetry, and textual criticism. PRE: BIL 4357. D

6311  Elementary Greek I. Introduction to Greek grammar and vocabulary. D

6312  Elementary Greek II. Greek grammar with an emphasis on reading in the New Testament. D

6314  Elementary Hebrew I. Introduction to Hebrew grammar and vocabulary. D

6315  Elementary Hebrew II. Hebrew grammar with an emphasis on reading in the Old Testament. D

(BIO) Biology

1003  Intergrated Science I Lab. Fee $75. CO: BIO1303. F

1004  Intergrated Science II Lab. Fee $75. CO: BIO1304. S

1005  Majors Biology I Lab. CO: BIO1405. Fee $100. F

1006  Majors Biology II Lab. CO: BIO1406. Fee $100. S

1300  Human Biology. Survey of human systems with an emphasis on integration of activities and heredity. No lab. Not for science majors. B

1303  Integrated Science I. Introduction to earth science and its relationship to the planets in the solar system, composition and atmosphere. Not for science majors. (2:3) CO: BIO1003. F

1304  Integrated Science II. Study of matter and energy types and transformations. Includes a section on the relationship of plants and plant life to energy changes. Not for science majors. (2:3) CO: BIO1004. S

1305  Contemporary Investigations in Biology. Contemporary issues in biology from evolution to genetics to ecology and ecosystem levels of biological organization. B

1405  Majors Biology I. Fundamentals of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. PRE: High school biology. (3:3) CO: BIO1005. F

1406  Majors Biology II. Fundamentals of organization of both plants and animals, including biological diversity and interdependence. (3:3) CO: BIO1006 S

2001  Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab. CO: BIO2401. Fee $100.F

2002  Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. CO: BIO2402. Fee $100. S

2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Structure and function of cells, tissues, and the general body plan; the integument, skeletal, and muscular systems. (3:3) CO: BIO2001 F

2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Continuation of BIO 2401. Structure and function of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and nervous systems, as well as a study of fluid, electrolyte and Ph balance of the body. (3:3) CO: BIO2002. S

3004  Advanced Botany Lab.  CO: BIO3304.  Fee $50. F

3005  Advanced Zoology Lab.  CO: BIO3305. S

3111  Microbiology Lab. CO: BIO 3310. For science majors only. Fee $100. B

3300  Genetics. Principles of inheritance from both a classical and molecular perspective. PRE: BIO 1405. S

3301  Introductory Genetics. Overview of the principles of inheritance for nursing  majors. B

3303  Cell and Molecular Biology. Structure and functions of the cell. PRE: CHE1307 or consent of instructor. (2:3) F

3304  Advanced Botany. Survey of the plant kingdom. Classification, structure, function and development are emphasized. (2:3) CO: BIO3004. F

3305  Advanced Zoology. Survey of the animal kingdom. Classification, structure, function and development are emphasized. (2:3) CO: BIO3005. S

3310  General Microbiology. Characteristics of microorganisms, their culture, uses, control and immunological aspects in industrial, domestic, and medical areas. Concurrent registration in the complementary laboratory course is required. PRE: CHE1306 or 1307; BIO1405 and 1406 or BIO2401 and 2402. B

3314  Physiology of Reproduction. Study of the reproductive processes in domestic animals. Emphasis on male and female anatomy, endocrinology, spermatogenesis, fertilization, parturition, reproductive cyclicity, and reproductive behavior. F

3320  Analytical Biotechnology. Introduction to laboratory techniques and analysis used in biochemistry. Topics include gel electrophoresis, acrylamide electrophoresis, restriction enzyme digestion, transformation of cells, purification and analysis of DNA, protein purification, PCR, and bioinformatics. Laboratory exercises reinforce scientific method, lab safety, importance of laboratory notebooks, applied problem solving, and the fundamentals of instrumentation. (1:6). Fee $150 S

3322  Nutrition. Study of nutrients, their functions and food sources, recommended daily allowances, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, and sound principles for nutrition throughout the life cycle. B

3325  General Entomology. Introduction to entomology, including the biology and diversity of insects and an introduction to management of insect pests of man, animals and plants. (2:3) D

3406  Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Study of vertebrate structure with emphasis on comparison of organ systems. Representative forms will be used in the laboratory. PRE: BIO2401 and 2402 or consent of instructor. (2:3) FO

4112  Animal Physiology Lab. Animal physiology lab. CO: BIO4312. S

4202  Biology Literature and Seminar. Review of classical and recent biological literature with both oral and written presentations required. PRE: Senior standing and 9 advanced hours in BIO. S

4303  Evolution. History, evidences, and theories of the origin and development of living organisms. PRE: 6 hours of science. F

4304  Concepts in Immunology. Study of cellular and molecular components of immune system, host defense mechanisms against microbes and other foreign antigens, and diseases caused by inappropriate immune system responses. PRE: BIO3303. S

4312  Animal Physiology. Functions of animal systems with emphasis on digestion, respiration, circulation and endocrinology. CO: BIO4112. S

4318  Biometrics. Introduction to statistics with primary emphasis on the biological and agricultural disciplines. Foundational principles of statistical theory and application including terminology, graphing, probability distributions, correlation, regression, experimental design, and statistical inference are covered. SE

4324  Embryology. Stages in development and the control of these processes with emphasis on the vertebrates. (2:3) SO

(BNT) New Testament

3303  General Writings. Intermediate studies of Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, and/or Revelation. Specific topics will appear on the transcript. D

3306  Paul’s Epistles. Intermediate studies of 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, and/or Philemon. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

4304  Acts. Advanced studies in the book of Acts. D

4305  Synoptic Gospels. Advanced studies in Matthew, Mark, and/or Luke. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

(BOT) Old Testament

3303  Poetry and Wisdom. Intermediate studies in Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, and/or Lamentations. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

3304  Historical Books. Intermediate studies in Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and/or Esther. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

3305  Minor Prophets. Intermediate studies in Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and/or Malachi. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

3310  Hebrew Narrative.  A study in the interpretation of biblical narrative, analyzing Old Testament narrative from a literary perspective with the aim of describing its conventions and techniques of composition for interpretation. D

4300  Advanced studies in the Psalms.  Topics include the formation and purpose of the psalter, genre identification, the artful use of language (allusion, imagery, symbol), the structural use of language (parallelisms), highlights in the history of Christian interpretation, and the Psalms’ importance for public and personal worship and spiritual formation. Substantial presentation and final written research project required. F

4306  Old Testament Law. Advanced studies in Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Number, and/or Deuteronomy. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

4307  Major Prophets. Advanced studies in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and/or Daniel. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

(BUA) Business Administration

1300  Introduction to Business. Survey of the nature of business and its relationship to society. Designed for beginning freshmen and students with no more than 6 hours of business administration courses. F

1302  Fundamentals in  Business.  Survey of the nature of business and its relationship to society. Provides a basic understanding of how the various fields of business work together to assure company success.

2310  Business Statistics. Collection, presentation, analysis, and interpretation of statistics applicable to business. PRE: MAT1311. B

2320  Introduction to Data Analytics. Introduction to the various aspects and practices dealing with data analytics. Students will develop applicable knowledge of the processes and methods related to the collection, handling, and analysis of data through the study and discussion of key topics and hands-on projects. Students will develop a strong foundation in essential areas that support analytics for decision-making within organizations. PRE: BUA2310. Fee $100.

3302  Case Study Analysis. Case study approach to identifying and solving problems in organizations. D

3305  Principles of Marketing. Current trends in marketing conditions, marketing agencies, factors affecting buying. F

3306  Consumer Behavior. Buying decision process and factors affecting buying behavior. Development of effective marketing strategy and tactics by understanding how and why consumers respond to marketing stimuli. S

3310  Money and Banking. Organization and operation of commercial banks and the money market. Examination of central banking and monetary policy. PRE: ECO 2301. B

3320  Business Ethics. Examine various theories of ethics, stressing Christian ethics in a business context. Special emphasis on current topics in business ethics. B

3330  Data Visualization. Introduction to the fundamental principles, strategies, and techniques needed to visually communicate, explore, and analyze data. Students will gain hands-on experience by visualizing real world datasets using advanced visualization software and develop an understanding of the methodologies needed for creating meaningful presentation of quantitative and qualitative data to facilitate effective decision-making within an organization. PRE: BUA2320.

3340  International Business. Examination of the global business environment, including an awareness of socio-cultural similarities and differences between countries and their impact on business strategy and practice; environmental concerns and political, legal, and ethical considerations in international business. PRE: Junior standing (at least 60 credit hours earned).

4300  Personal Selling and Sales Promotion. Selling and negotiating and sales promotion as related to new enterprise and ongoing firm. Promotional strategies especially for small business where uniqueness of promotional tools is more critical than in large businesses. PRE: Junior standing. D

4301  Business Law. Introduction to the law stressing contracts, negotiable instruments, agencies, mortgages, personal property, real property, and business organization. B

4304  Marketing Research. Research methods and techniques that aid marketing management and the application of these tools to the process of obtaining information upon which to base marketing strategy. PRE: BUA 2310 and 3305. D

4330  Internship. Work in an area of business utilizing skill developed in the Business program. PRE: Senior standing and approval of the instructor. Y

4380  Business Policy. Integrative course focusing on an organization’s pursuit of superior economic performance over a long term by deciding what business to be in and how to compete. This is a capstone course restricted to graduating seniors only. Fee: $35. B

(CFM) Children's Ministry

2311  Foundations of Children, Youth and Family Ministry. Introduces students to the world of children, youth and family ministry and contemporary influences on, and ways to approach, ever-changing youth culture. D

2326  Practice of Children and Family Ministry. Explores pragmatic side of ministry to children and their families by considering strategic issues of program management, faith development in children, ministry to self, and other issues leading to the development of effective ministers to children and their families. S

3301  Children's Spiritual Formation. Study and consideration of the spiritual formation of children in light of theological, psychological, sociological, and cultural realities. Considers attention to diversity and children with special needs, inter-generational ministry, equipping parents, and age-appropriate spiritual disciplines. FD

3302  Methods for Children's Spiritual Formation. Development of skills necessary to choose and implement programs and curriculum, develop teaching strategies to support spiritual formation of children within the church and home, and equip volunteers. SD

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in student area of ministry, culminating in a final, written report. Recommended for summer completion with fall enrollment. F

5301  Foundations of Children’s Ministry.  Constructs a spiritually formative foundation of children’s ministry through the lens of Christian hospitality.  Learners will identify theological positions that shape the church’s ministry with children.  Students will consider discipleship, critical thinking in spiritual formation, and cultural issues.

5302  Leading Children’s Ministry.  Prepares students for the leadership and administrative responsibilities of the children’s minister.  Topics include creating a vision for children’s ministry, recruiting and training volunteers, child protection policies, and short-term and long-term ministry planning.

5303  Congregational Leadership.  This course encourages students to consider what Christian leadership is, the character of the leader, and the personal development of a leader including the development of a non-anxious presence.  Students will learn about change management and evaluating ministry plans, as well as developing skills for positive conflict engagement.

(CHE) Chemistry

1106  Introductory Chemistry Lab. CO: CHE 1306. Fee $50. Y

1107  General Chemistry Lab I. CO: CHE 1307. Fee $100. B

1108  General Chemistry Lab II. CO: CHE 1308. Fee $100. S

1306  Introductory Chemistry. Introductory chemistry for nursing, human science, non-science majors. CO: CHE 1106. Y

1307  General Chemistry I. Introduction to chemistry for students majoring in science. Includes gas laws, bonding theory, atomic structure, solutions, acid-base and redox reactions. PRE: CHE1306 or high school chemistry. CO: CHE 1107. B

1308  General Chemistry II. Continuation of CHE 1307, including basic inorganic chemistry, aqueous reactions, rates, equilibrium, nuclear and some descriptive chemistry. PRE: CHE 1307. CO: CHE 1108. S

2402  Integrated Organic and Biochemistry. Organic and biochemistry for agriculture, nutrition, nursing and education majors. Emphasis is on nomenclature, major functional groups and reactions of organic and biochemical. Not intended for chemistry or biology majors. PRE: CHE 1306, 1106. D

3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab. Practice in basic operations and preparations of organic chemistry using micro lab ware. CO: CHE 3301. Fee $100. F

3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab. Additional organic chemistry preparations, functional group reactions, and identification of unknowns using traditional means, IR, and NMR spectra. CO: CHE 3302. Fee $100. S

3181, 4182 Undergraduate Research. Research in chemistry, where students complete a minimum of 180 hours, 12 hours a week for a 15 week term, work in the Biochemistry Research Laboratory in order to receive this credit. A paper summarizing the work, written in an appropriate journal style will be submitted by each student to the Research Supervisor/Course Instructor. May be taken up to four terms for a total of 4 credit hours of undergraduate research. PRE: Prior consent of Research Supervisor. B

3211  Integrated Physical and Analytical Chemistry Lab.  Two credit hour laboratory course covering major concepts and techniques in the areas of physical and analytical chemistry. Fee $100. SO

3301  Organic Chemistry I. Hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, and organometallics. PRE: CHE 1308. CO: CHE 3101. F

3302  Organic Chemistry II. Continuation of 3301 with other organic series, NMR, IR. PRE: CHE 3301. CO: CHE 3102. S

3305  Analytical Chemistry I. Quantitative chemical analysis by gravimetric and volumetric methods. PRE: CHE 1308. CO: CHE 3105. FO

3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods. Study in the use of spectroscopic, spectrophotometric and chromatographic instruments in chemical analyses and the chemistry behind the instruments. Fee $100 SE

3310  Laboratory Management and Demonstrations. Equips students to equip and organize a stockroom, conduct laboratory sessions with groups, and to safely and effectively use demonstrations. S

3320  Analytical Biotechnology. Introduction to laboratory techniques and analysis used in biochemistry. Topics include gel electrophoresis, acrylamide electrophoresis, restriction enzyme digestion, transformation of cells, purification and analysis of DNA, protein purification, PCR, and bioinformatics. Laboratory exercises reinforce scientific method, lab safety, importance of laboratory notebooks, applied problem solving, and fundamentals of instrumentation. PRE: CHE 3301 or CHE 2402. (1:6) D

4102  Chemical Literature and Seminar. Emphasizes acquaintance with chemical literature and how to make a literature search. Includes research projects and a research paper. S

4311  Biochemistry I. Structure and properties of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, bioenergetics, and intermediary metabolism. PRE: CHE 3301 or concurrent. F

4312  Biochemistry II. Nucleic acids, protein synthesis, nutrition, the immune system, drug metabolism, and hormones. S

4323  Physical Chemistry I. Introduction to theoretical chemistry. Gas properties, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. PRE: CHE 1308 and MAT 1402 or concurrent. CO: CHE 4123. FE

4324  Physical Chemistry II. Quantum mechanics, Symmetry and Group Theory, Spectroscopy, and Statistical Thermodynamics. SO

(COM) Communication

1100, 2100  Electronic Activity Lab. Involvement in various productions assisting in setup, running, and post production activities for video and audio at university games, productions, and chapel. May be repeated for credit. B

1105, 2105  News Lab. Study and practice of fundamental principles of news gathering and reporting. Students participate in the production of the campus news. B

1351  Principles of Mass Media. Introduction to mass media and the major issues that influence media. The course will be predominantly a discussion of these major issues, such as freedom of the press, and how issues influence the journalist and society. F

2303  Principles of Announcing. Fundamentals of announcing theory focusing on clear diction, delivery style, and thematic elements of production. Students will produce audition tape for submission to industry. FO

2311  Introduction to Public Address. Introduction to the basic theories of public speaking. An emphasis is placed on delivery skills and communication apprehension. Students learn to prepare and deliver informative and persuasive speeches in an appropriate manner. D

2312  UIL Events. Study of University Interscholastic League (UIL) speech events. Debate, oral interpretation, prose and poetry are among the events examined. Emphasis is placed on coaching and judging the events at the high school level. D

2320  Videography and Photography.  Fundamentals of capturing images by video and photo, including introduction of concepts related to image capture and application of skills necessary to achieve desired video and photo images.  Students will learn using department assigned cameras at skill levels from entry to professional. SO

2340  Communication for the Professional. Introduction to basic skills, principles, and contexts of communication in business and professional settings, including public speaking and group communication. B

2348  Communication Theory. Introduction to formal research methods within the field and examination of quantitative and qualitative empirical techniques. FE

2351  Introduction to Public Relations. Introduction to basic principles and trends of current public relations theories and practices and the workings of mass media. F

2360  Social Media Communications.  Examination of the role social media plays in our communication environment, including the history of social media, penetration of social media into society, the positives, negatives, and effective utilization of social media.  Course will also analyze convergent media, ethics in use of social media, as well as symbolic convergence and emergence of thematic tribes in social media. FO

3301  Sports Writing and Reporting. Study of traditional storytelling formats with special instruction in sports style, interviewing techniques, research strategies, sports law, sports and new media, and issues of race and gender. FE

3310  Systems in Organizational Communication. Systems approach to communication principles applied to managerial situations. D

3313  Interpersonal Communication. Study of the human communication process in one to one encounters. SO

3331  Television Production. Study of basic aspects of live television production, including on-camera performance, and studio work such as control room fundamentals, operation of video cameras, audio, and directing. SO

3342  Communication and Life Work (H). Analysis of political speaking and social movements in relation to ancient and contemporary communication theory. S

3343  News Reporting. Fundamental principles of news gathering and reporting. Focuses on ethical standards of journalism and modern practices of reporting in a convergent media environment. Practical applications for print, video, and audio reporting across variety of electronic media platform. FO

3350  Worship Media Production. Examines various issues, including song presentation software, media clips, copyright law, and use of live video in worship. Particular emphasis is placed on utilizing media to enhance worship and coordinating themed services. D

3354  Advertising. Study of mass media advertising, its selection and evaluation, including discussion of advertising theory, tactics and creativity. S

3360  E-marketing and Social Media.  Examination of the changing nature of marketing due to the targeting opportunities provided by social media.  As social media has rapidly become a primary vehicle for advertising, particular emphasis will be placed on utilizing available tools to find the desired target audience and tailor the message to maximize efficacy. Additionally, course will analyze ethical issues related to the use of social media in target audiences. FO

3371  Group Communication. Study of group behavior, participation, structure, leadership and the importance of group discussion to our society. F

3372  Intercultural Communication. Study of communication between peoples of various cultures and the issues that enhance and impede effective cross-cultural communication. SE

3374  Nonverbal Communication. Study of the various types of nonverbal behavior, as well as an examination of nonverbal issues such as deception, compliance gaining, and communicator competence. SO

4321  Advanced Public Speaking and Rhetorical Analysis. Study of persuasion and rhetorical appeals through public speaking. Learning objectives include the rhetoric of messages in the public delivery forum, as well as presenting and improving the delivery of speeches. SE

4330  Communication Internship. Communication experience in local business context under the direction and supervision of management and faculty. Internship requires 90 hours of field placement. B

4341  Communication and Conflict. Focus on the nature of conflict in various setting; interpersonal, intercultural, organizational, and group. Communication strategies and theories are examined at each level. SO

4345  Introduction to Rhetorical Analysis. Examination of the theoretical elements of rhetorical theory, including an analysis and critique of contemporary artifacts. D

4372  Organizational Communication. Study of communication networks found in various business, industrial, educational, and social organizations. SE

4374  Persuasive Communication. Study of the psychological and rhetorical principles employed in contemporary, social, political, and advertising campaigns. FE

5301  Communication in Organizations. Study of communication networks and styles operating in organizations, especially educational institutions, as well as the role of the professional educator in those structures. D

(COU) Counseling

5141  Christian Worldview in Counseling. Examination of the impact of a Christian worldview on individual and family beliefs, interaction, and structure. Consideration will be given to the role of a Christian worldview in counseling. Y

5302  Foundations of Clinical Practice. Intensive overview of therapeutic interventions for working with children, adolescents, and their families.  Students will learn about the historical context, current research about issues related to this population, and ethical and legal considerations. Course will include information on developmental psychopathology as well as techniques and strategies from various theories and approaches, including systemic, Adlerian, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and psychodynamic.

5310  Individual and Family Lifespan Human Development. Examines the stages of individual development as they occur in the context of the family life cycle. Consideration will be given to how various tasks, transitions, and events impact individuals and families at different stages of life. Students will integrate a linear individual perspective to human development with a systemic family perspective. Y

5311  Lifespan, Development, and Human Sexuality. Examination of the stages of normal human growth and development as they occur in the context of the family life cycle. Consideration will be given to how the various tasks, transitions, and events impact individuals and families at different stages of life. Human intellectual, physical, social, sexuality, and emotional development from prenatal origins through adulthood will be examined. Students will integrate a linear individual perspective to human development with a systemic family perspective.

5314  Assessment of Individuals and Families. Examination of the major individual, marital, and family assessment strategies and instruments. Students will receive training in the use of both testing and non-testing approaches to assessment and appraisal. Attention will be given to the relationship between assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Fee $200. Y

5320  Research in Counseling. Survey and analysis of research methodology and program evaluation in the counseling profession. Topics include current trends in counseling research, writing research reports, and qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods design, and implementation and data analysis. Fee $50. Y

5321  Statistics. Study of statistical concepts and their application to counseling. Emphasis on estimation and inferences, and statistical methods, including simple and multiple regression, single factor and multifactor analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, goodness of fit tests, contingency tables, nonparametric procedures, and power of tests. Y

5322  Research and Program Development. Introduction to the important concepts related to research and program development within the counseling profession. Students will learn common research designs, how to construct research questions, develop a literature review, and information on program evaluation. Current published research will be used to examine different paradigms, research methods, statistics, procedures, and findings. Students will develop research questions and learn how to write literature reviews for topics related to the counseling profession while considering ethical and legal principles. Student will learn how to conduct, interpret, and report research results in culturally and developmentally appropriate ways.

5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law. Focuses on the development of a professional attitude and identity as a marriage and family therapist and a professional counselor. Areas of consideration will include professional socialization, the role of professional organizations, licensure and certification, legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical practice and research, family law, confidentiality issues, codes of ethics, the role of the therapist in court proceedings, and inter professional cooperation. Y

5343  Introduction to School Counseling. Foundations of the profession of school counseling. Includes examination of the philosophy, history, and current trends in school counseling and in education, as well as investigations of the concepts of developmental counseling programs for Pre-K-12 students and the ASCA national model and standards for school counseling programs. Special attention given to childhood mental health and behavioral disorders from the DSM-5. Y

5344  Counseling Special Populations. This course addresses major aspects related to counseling clients diagnosed with special needs under federal law as well as at-risk students. The course will explore counseling techniques, evidence-based interventions, and modifications of those interventions related to life coping skills. Emphasis is placed on resilient outcomes for students.  Topics include ethics, varying diagnoses, gender, culture, maltreatment, chronic loss and life stressors affecting academic progress. Y

5353  Psychopathology of Individuals and Families. Detailed overview of psychopathology and analysis of psychopathology in educational and counseling settings. Students will receive training in the use of the DSM-5 and its application. Diagnostic and treatment planning skills will be facilitated through the use of case studies. Y

5356  Advanced Psychopathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning. Detailed study of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as it relates to psychopathology, case conceptualization, and treatment planning. This course specifically addresses how to accurately diagnose clients based on eh DSM. Case conceptualization and treatment planning will be based on specific evidence-based counseling theories. Basic use of psychoactive drugs and their efficacy will be discussed.  Skills will be developed through case studies.

5357  Advanced Approaches in Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy. Designed for graduate students and practicing therapists who want to deepen their knowledge and skills in specific areas of couple and family therapy. Participants will explore contemporary and postmodern models, complex relational dynamics, integration, and research in the field.  The course offers a comprehensive understanding of advanced theories and practical techniques, equipping students with the tools to address complex issues in therapeutic practice.

5358  Working with Systemic and Family Issues. Core component of the Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy program, designed to provide students with essential knowledge and skills for addressing systemic and family-related challenges in clinical practice. This course explores the intricate dynamics within couples and families, emphasizing a systemic perspective to assess, diagnose, and intervene effectively. Students will engage in experiential learning, case studies, and discussions to develop competence in working with diverse family systems.

5360  Counseling Theory and Practice. Examination of the major theories and models of counseling. Ethical and culturally relevant issues of in-person and technology-assisted relationships and the impact of technology on counseling is examined. Students expected to develop a coherent theoretical rationale for their therapeutic interventions. Y

5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling. Introduction to the skills involved in developing effective helping relationships. The processes, principles, and techniques associated with counseling are explored. Experiential component fosters the development of basic interviewing, listening, and counseling skills. Additional techniques and resources are reviewed and evaluated. Y

5362  Career Counseling. Reviews concepts, issues, and trends in the field of career counseling and career education. It is designed to consider the role of the counselor in the career decision-making process of individuals across the lifespan. Consideration will be given to the relationships between work, career development, and family functioning. Fee: $100. Y

5363  Group Counseling. Study of theoretical foundations of group counseling and group work. Emphasis on dynamics associated with group process and development. Ethical and culturally relevant strategies for designing and facilitating groups. Students are provided direct experiences to participate as group members and leaders in small group activities. Fee: $100. Y

5364  Crisis Counseling. Study of crisis with emphasis on appropriate behaviors and responses to crisis. Applied therapeutic counseling in general and crisis intervention are presented along with strategies to alleviate crisis and deal with crisis aftermath. Y

5365  Advanced Counseling Techniques. Explores case conceptualization skills including diagnosing, intervention strategies, treatment planning, and case monitoring. Supervised experience in counseling through role playing, recorded interviews, observation analysis, evaluation of interviewing techniques. Special attention given to creative and active techniques and advanced skills in various treatment modalities. Y

5366  Crisis/Trauma Counseling.  Study and Practice in understanding crisis theory and crisis-induced dysfunctional behavior, trauma, crisis situations, and crisis/emergency intervention approaches. These interventions will help clients, students, and personnel in emotional crises return to a state of cognitive, affective, and behavioral equilibrium and functional coping.  This includes addressing suicide, abuse, traumatic situations, and disasters.  This course will cover therapeutic approaches that address intervention in ongoing abuse, crisis intervention, as well as healing in the aftermath of abuse, crisis, and trauma.

5371  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Practicum. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly university class attendance an individual or triadic site supervision by site supervisor is required. PRE: Approval of Program Director. Fee: $60

5372  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Internship I. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly individual and group supervision sessions are required. Fee: $60. Y

5373  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Internship II. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly individual and group supervision sessions are required. Fee: $60. Y

5378  Social and Cultural Foundations. Maximizes student effectiveness in working with clients who have different worldviews and experiences related to heritage, cultural identity, attitudes, values, beliefs, and understandings within group differences and acculturative experiences, disabilities, races, religions, sexual orientations, and economic backgrounds.  Different theories and models of multicultural counseling will be discussed.  Research and information about cultural competence, social justice, microaggressions, specific populations, sexual orientation and gender identity, poverty, and disability will be included.  Students will also learn the effects of historical events, trauma, and current issues regarding different cultural groups.

5379  Systemic and Family Theories. Comprehensive overview of the various theories, models, and systemic approaches to marital and family therapy. Consideration will be given to the therapeutic skills and assumptions associated with the following treatment approaches: cognitive-behavioral, intergenerational, narrative, solution-focused, structural, and strategic models of therapy.  Students will participate in and in-depth exploration of their own families of origin.

5382  Premarital and Marital Therapy. Study of the various theories and models of mate selection, marital interaction, and marital intervention. Students will receive training in diagnosing and intervening in dysfunctional relationship patterns. Strategies associated with premarital counseling and divorce adjustment counseling will also be explored. Y

5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents, and Their Families. Intensive overview of therapeutic strategies for working with children, adolescents and their families. Students will learn about the historical context, current research about issues related to this population, and ethical and legal considerations. Consideration will be given to developmental psychopathology. Techniques and strategies from Adlerian, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and systemic approaches will be presented. Fee: $100. Y

5384  Addictions. Study of definitions of addiction, substance abuse and dependence, and counseling persons with substance abuse disorders and process disorders. Holistic approach to treatment and recovery is emphasized. Assessment, initial treatment, and intervention techniques are explored for rehabilitation of substance use disorders. Y

5386  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum.  Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy.  Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

5387  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I.  Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

5388  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II.  Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

5391  Counseling Practicum. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. PRE: Approval of program director. Fee: $60. Y

5394  School Counseling Practicum. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of school counseling. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

5395  School Counseling Internship I. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of school counseling. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

5396  School Counseling Internship II. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of school counseling. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. Fee: $60. Y

6062  Comprehensive Exam. Comprehensive, written examination for a graduate degree. To be taken during the last semester. Y

6063  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Exam. Comprehensive, written examination for a graduate degree. To be taken during the last semester. Y

6064  School Counseling Exam. Texas School Counselor exam.  To be taken during the last semester. Y

6065  Marital, Couples, and Family Therapy Exam. Comprehensive, written examination for a graduate degree. To be taken during the last semester. Y

(CRJ) Criminal Justice